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Andre Laguerre
Marc André Laguerre (February 21, 1915 – January 18, 1979) was a journalist and magazine editor, best known as the managing editor of Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
from 1960 to 1974, during which time he oversaw the growth in the magazine from a niche publication to become the industry leader in weekly sports magazines. It was under his leadership that the annual Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
Swimsuit Issue was first published
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Ottery St. Mary
Ottery St Mary, known as "Ottery" (/ˈɒtəri/ or locally /ˈɒtri/), is a town and civil parish in the East Devon
Devon
district of Devon, England, on the River Otter, about 10 miles (16 km) east of Exeter
Exeter
on the B3174. At the 2001 census, the parish, which includes the villages of Metcombe, Fairmile, Alfington, Tipton St John, Wiggaton, and (until 2017) West Hill, had a population of 7,692.[1] The population of the urban area alone at the 2011 census was 4,898.[2] There are two electoral wards in Ottery (Rural & Town). The total population of both wards, including the adjacent civil parish of Aylesbeare, at the above census was 9,022.[3][4] Ottery is first attested in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086, where it appears as 'Otri' and 'Otrei'. 'Oteri Sancte Marie' is first mentioned in 1242. The town takes its name from the River Otter on which it stands, the river taking its name from the animal
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St. Moritz
St. Moritz
St. Moritz
(also German: Sankt Moritz, Romansh:  San Murezzan (help·info), Italian: San Maurizio, French: Saint-Moritz) is a high Alpine resort in the Engadine in Switzerland, at an elevation of about 1,800 metres (5,910 ft) above sea level. It is Upper Engadine's major village and a municipality in the district of Maloja in the Swiss canton of Graubünden. St. Moritz
St. Moritz
lies on the southern slopes of the Albula Alps
Alps
below the Piz Nair
Piz Nair
(3,056 m or 10,026 ft) overlooking the flat and wide glaciated valley of the Upper Engadine
Upper Engadine
and eponymous lake: Lej da San Murezzan (Romansh for Lake of St. Moritz)
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Press Secretary
A press secretary or press officer is a senior advisor who provides advice on how to deal with the news media and, using news management techniques, helps his or her employer to maintain a positive public image and avoid negative media coverage. Duties and functions[edit] They often, but not always, act as the organization's senior spokesperson. Many governments also have deputy press secretaries. A deputy press secretary is typically a mid-level political staffer who assists the press secretary and communications director with aspects of public outreach. They often write the press releases and media advisories for review by the press secretary and communications director. There are usually assistant press secretaries and press officers that support the press secretary. Press secretaries give also declarations to the media when a particular event happens or an issue arises inside an organization
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Governor of New York GovernorshipPresident of the United States PresidencyFirst Term1932 campaignElection1st Inauguration First 100 daysNew Deal Glass-Steagall Act WPA Social Security SEC Fireside ChatsSecond Term1936 campaignElection2nd InaugurationSupreme Court Packing National Recovery Act 1937 Recession March of Dimes Pre-war foreign policyThird Term1940 campaignElection3rd InaugurationWorld War IIWorld War IIAttack on Pearl Harbor Infamy Speech Atlantic Charter Japanese Internment Tehran Conference United Nations D-DaySecond Bill of Rights G.I
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Henry Luce
Henry Robinson Luce (April 3, 1898 – February 28, 1967) was an American magazine magnate who was called "the most influential private citizen in the America of his day".[1] He launched and closely supervised a stable of magazines that transformed journalism and the reading habits of upscale Americans. Time summarized and interpreted the week's news; Life was a picture magazine of politics, culture, and society that dominated American visual perceptions in the era before television; Fortune explored the economy in depth and the world business; and Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
explored the motivations and strategies of sports teams and key players
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Albert Camus
Albert Camus
Albert Camus
(/kæˈmuː/;[2] French: [albɛʁ kamy] ( listen); 7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French philosopher, author, and journalist. His views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism. He wrote in his essay The Rebel that his whole life was devoted to opposing the philosophy of nihilism while still delving deeply into individual freedom. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature
Nobel Prize in Literature
at the age of 43 in 1957, the second youngest recipient in history.[3] Camus did not consider himself to be an existentialist despite usually being classified as a follower of it, even in his lifetime.[4] In a 1945 interview, Camus rejected any ideological associations: "No, I am not an existentialist
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International Herald Tribune
The New York Times
The New York Times
International Edition is an English-language newspaper printed at 38 sites throughout the world and sold in more than 160 countries and territories. Founded under the title Paris Herald in 1887 in Paris
Paris
as the European edition of the New York Herald, it changed owners and was renamed several times: it became the Paris
Paris
Herald Tribune, global edition of the New York Herald
New York Herald
Tribune in 1924, then the International Herald Tribune in 1967, with The Washington Post and The New York Times
The New York Times
as joint parent newspapers. In 2002, The New York Times
The New York Times
Company took control of the International Herald Tribune, which was subtitled since then The Global Edition of the New York Times
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Pseudonym
A pseudonym (/ˈsjuːdənɪm/ or /ˈsuːdənɪm/ SEW-də-nim) or alias is a name that a person or group assumes for a particular purpose, which can differ from their original or true name (orthonym).[1] Pseudonyms include stage names and user names (both called screen names), ring names, pen names, nicknames, aliases, superhero or villain identities and code names, gamer identifications, and regnal names of emperors, popes, and other monarchs. Historically, they have often taken the form of anagrams, Graecisms, and Latinisations, although there are many other methods of choosing a pseudonym.[2] Pseudonyms should not be confused with new names that replace old ones and become the individual's full-time name. Pseudonyms are "part-time" names, used only in certain contexts – usually adopted to hide an individual's real identity, as with writers' pen names, graffiti artists' tags, resistance fighters' or terrorists' noms de guerre, and computer hackers' handles
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4,638-square-mile) Île-de-
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1948 Winter Olympics
The 1948 Winter Olympics, officially known as the V Olympic Winter Games (French: Les Ves Jeux olympiques d'hiver; German: Olympische Winterspiele 1948; Italian: V Giochi olimpici invernali; Romansh: Gieus olimpics d'enviern 1948), was a winter multi-sport event celebrated in 1948 in St. Moritz, Switzerland. The Games were the first to be celebrated after World War II; it had been 12 years since the last Winter Games in 1936. From the selection of a host city in a neutral country to the exclusion of Japan
Japan
and Germany, the political atmosphere of the post-war world was inescapable during the Games. The organizing committee faced several challenges due to the lack of financial and human resources consumed by the war. These were the first of two winter Olympic Games
Olympic Games
under the IOC presidency of Sigfrid Edström. There were 28 nations that marched in the opening ceremonies on January 30, 1948
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Switzerland
Switzerland
Switzerland
(/ˈswɪtsərlənd/), officially the Swiss Confederation, is a federal republic in Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern
Bern
is the seat of the federal authorities.[1][2][note 1] The country is situated in Western-Central Europe,[note 4] and is bordered by Italy
Italy
to the south, France
France
to the west, Germany
Germany
to the north, and Austria
Austria
and Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein
to the east. Switzerland
Switzerland
is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi) (land area 39,997 km2 (15,443 sq mi))
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Appeal Of June 18
The Appeal of 18 June
Appeal of 18 June
(French: L'Appel du 18 juin) was a famous speech by Charles de Gaulle, the leader of the Free French Forces, in 1940. The appeal is often considered to be the origin of the French Resistance to the German occupation during World War II. De Gaulle spoke to the French people from London
London
after the fall of France. He declared that the war for France
France
was not yet over, and rallied the country in support of the Resistance. It is regarded as one of the most important speeches in French history. In spite of its reputation as the beginning of the Resistance and Free French, historians have shown that the appeal was heard only by a minority of French people
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1952 Summer Olympics
The 1952 Summer Olympics
1952 Summer Olympics
(Finnish: Kesäolympialaiset 1952; Swedish: Olympiska sommarspelen 1952), officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad, were an international multi-sport event held in Helsinki, Finland, in 1952. Helsinki
Helsinki
had been earlier selected to host the 1940 Summer Olympics, which were cancelled due to World War II. It is the northernmost city at which a summer Olympic Games
Olympic Games
have been held. These were the first games to be held in a non-Indo-European language speaking country
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Helsinki
Helsinki
Helsinki
(/ˈhɛlsɪŋki/ or /hɛlˈsɪŋki/;[7][8] Finnish pronunciation: [ˈhelsiŋki] ( listen); Swedish: Helsingfors; Swedish pronunciation: [helsiŋˈfors] ( listen)) is the capital city and most populous municipality of Finland. Helsinki
Helsinki
is the seat of the region of Uusimaa
Uusimaa
in southern Finland, on the shore of the Gulf of Finland. Helsinki
Helsinki
has a population of 642,045,[3] the Helsinki urban area
Helsinki urban area
has a population of 1,231,595,[9] and the Helsinki metropolitan area has a population of over 1.4 million, making it the most populous municipality and urban area in Finland. Helsinki
Helsinki
is located 80 kilometres (50 mi) north of Tallinn, Estonia, 400 km (250 mi) east of Stockholm, Sweden, and 390 km (240 mi) west of Saint Petersburg, Russia
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