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Andrés Bonifacio
Philippine RevolutionCry of Pugad Lawin Battle
Battle
of Manila
Manila
(1896) Battle
Battle
of San Juan del Monte Battle
Battle
of Pasong Tamo Battle
Battle
of San Mateo and MontalbanPolitical party La Liga Filipina KatipunanSpouse(s) Monica (c. 1880–1890, her death) Gregoria de Jesús
Gregoria de Jesús
(1893–1897, his death)Children Andres de Jesús Bonifacio, Jr. (born on early 1896, died in infancy)SignatureAndrés Bonifacio (November 30, 1863 – May 10, 1897) was a Filipino revolutionary leader and the president of the Tagalog Republic. He is often called "The Father of the Philippine Revolution"
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Secret Society
A secret society is a club or an organization whose activities, events, inner functioning, or membership are concealed from non-members. The society may or may not attempt to conceal its existence. The term usually excludes covert groups, such as intelligence agencies or guerrilla insurgencies, that hide their activities and memberships but maintain a public presence
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Freemasonry
Freemasonry
Freemasonry
or Masonry consists of fraternal organisations that trace their origins to the local fraternities of stonemasons, which from the end of the fourteenth century regulated the qualifications of stonemasons and their interaction with authorities and clients. The degrees of freemasonry retain the three grades of medieval craft guilds, those of Apprentice, Journeyman
Journeyman
or fellow (now called Fellowcraft), and Master Mason. These are the degrees offered by Craft (or Blue Lodge) Freemasonry. Members of these organisations are known as Freemasons or Masons. There are additional degrees, which vary with locality and jurisdiction, and are usually administered by different bodies than the craft degrees. The basic, local organisational unit of Freemasonry
Freemasonry
is the Lodge
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Spanish Naming Customs
Spanish naming customs
Spanish naming customs
are historical traditions for naming children practised in Spain. According to these customs, a person's name consists of a given name (simple or composite) followed by two family names (surnames). The first surname is usually the father's first surname, and the second the mother's first surname. In recent years, the order of the surnames can be decided at birth. Often, the practice is to use one given name and the first surname only (e.g. Miguel de Unamuno), with the full name being used in legal, formal, and documentary matters, or for disambiguation when the first surname is very common (e.g. Federico García Lorca). [1]. In these cases, it is common to use only the second surname, as in “Lorca” or “Zapatero”
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Victor Hugo
Victor Marie Hugo (French: [viktɔʁ maʁi yɡo] ( listen); 26 February 1802 – 22 May 1885) was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement. Hugo is considered to be one of the greatest and best-known French writers. Outside of France, his most famous works are the novels Les Misérables, 1862, and The Hunchback of Notre-Dame
The Hunchback of Notre-Dame
(French: Notre-Dame de Paris), 1831. In France, Hugo is known primarily for his poetry collections, such as Les Contemplations
Les Contemplations
(The Contemplations) and La Légende des siècles (The Legend of the Ages). Hugo was at the forefront of the romantic literary movement with his play Cromwell and drama Hernani. Many of his works have inspired music, both during his lifetime and after his death, including the musicals Notre-Dame de Paris
Paris
and Les Misérables
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Les Misérables
Les Misérables
Les Misérables
(French pronunciation: ​[le mizeʁabl(ə)]) is a French historical novel by Victor Hugo, first published in 1862, that is considered one of the greatest novels of the 19th century. In the English-speaking world, the novel is usually referred to by its original French title
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Eugène Sue
Marie-Joseph "Eugène" Sue (French pronunciation: ​[ø.ʒɛn sy] (26 January 1804 – 3 August 1857) was a French novelist. He was one of several authors who popularized the genre of the serial novel in France with his very popular and widely imitated The Mysteries of Paris, which was published in a newspaper from 1842 to 1843.Contents1 Early life 2 Literary career 3 Political career 4 Legacy 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] He was born in Paris, the son of a distinguished surgeon in Napoleon's army, Jean-Joseph Sue, and is said to have had the Empress Joséphine for godmother. Sue himself acted as surgeon both in the 1823 French campaign in Spain and at the Battle of Navarino
Battle of Navarino
(1828)
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Le Juif Errant
The Wandering Jew
Wandering Jew
(French: Le Juif errant) is an 1844 novel by the French writer Eugène Sue.Contents1 Plot 2 Publication 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksPlot[edit] The story is entitled The Wandering Jew, but the figure of the Wandering Jew
Wandering Jew
himself plays a minimal role. The prologue of the text describes two figures who cry out to each other across the Bering Straits. One is the Wandering Jew, the other his sister, Hérodiade. The Wandering Jew
Wandering Jew
also represents the cholera epidemic— wherever he goes, cholera follows in his wake.[1] The Wandering Jew
Wandering Jew
and Hérodiade are condemned to wander the earth until the entire Rennepont family has disappeared from the earth. The connection is that the descendants of the sister are also the descendants of Marius de Rennepont, Huguenots persecuted under Louis XIV by the Jesuits
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Tagalog Language
Tagalog (/təˈɡɑːlɒɡ/;[6] Tagalog pronunciation: [tɐˈɡaːloɡ]) is an Austronesian language spoken as a first language by a quarter of the population of the Philippines
Philippines
and as a second language by the majority. Its standardized form, officially named Filipino, is the national language of the Philippines, and is one of two official languages alongside English. It is related to other Philippine languages, such as the Bikol languages, Ilocano, the Visayan languages, Kapampangan, and Pangasinan, and more distantly to other Austronesian languages, such as the Formosan languages
Formosan languages
of Taiwan, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Hawaiian, Māori, and Malagasy
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English Language In The Philippines
Philippine English is any variety of English (similar and related to English) native to the Philippines, including those used by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos. English is taught in schools as one of the two official languages of the country, the other being Filipino (Tagalog). Code-switching is prevalent in informal situations.Contents1 Orthography and grammar 2 Phonology2.1 Consonants 2.2 Vowels 2.3 Other features 2.4 Non-native pronunciation3 History 4 Industries based on English 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksOrthography and grammar[edit] Philippine laws and court decisions, with extremely rare exceptions, are written solely in English. English is also used in higher education, religious affairs, print and broadcast media, and business. Most educated Filipinos are bilinguals and speak English as one of their languages
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Leprosy
Leprosy, also known as Hansen's disease (HD), is a long-term infection by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae
Mycobacterium leprae
or Mycobacterium lepromatosis.[3][4] Initially, infections are without symptoms and typically remain this way for 5 to 20 years.[3] Symptoms that develop include granulomas of the nerves, respiratory tract, skin, and eyes.[3] This may result in a lack of ability to feel pain, thus loss of parts of extremities due to repeated injuries or infection due to unnoticed wounds.[2] Weakness and poor eyesight may also be present.[2]
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Catholic Church
GodTrinity Pater Filius Spiritus Sanctus Consubstantialitas Filioque Divinum illud munusDivine Law Decalogus Ex Cathedra DeificatioRealms beyond the States of the Church Heaven Purgatory Limbo HellMysterium Fidei Passion of Jesus Crucifixion
Crucifixion
of Jesus Harrowing of Hell Resurrection AscensionBeatæ Mariæ Semper Virginis Mariology Veneration Immaculate Conception Mater Dei Perpetual virginity Assumption TitlesOther teachings Josephology Morality Body Lectures Sexuality Apologetics Divine grace Salvation Original sin Saints DogmaTexts Biblia Sacra S
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Rattan
Rattan
Rattan
(from the Malay rotan) is the name for roughly 600 species of old world climbing palms belonging to subfamily Calamoideae
Calamoideae
(from the Greek 'kálamos' = reed).[1]
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Catholicism
GodTrinity Pater Filius Spiritus Sanctus Consubstantialitas Filioque Divinum illud munusDivine Law Decalogus Ex Cathedra DeificatioRealms beyond the States of the Church Heaven Purgatory Limbo HellMysterium Fidei Passion of Jesus Crucifixion
Crucifixion
of Jesus Harrowing of Hell Resurrection AscensionBeatæ Mariæ Semper Virginis Mariology Veneration Immaculate Conception Mater Dei Perpetual virginity Assumption TitlesOther teachings Josephology Morality Body Lectures Sexuality Apologetics Divine grace Salvation Original sin Saints DogmaTexts Biblia Sacra S
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Smallpox
Smallpox
Smallpox
was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor.[7] The last naturally occurring case was diagnosed in October 1977 and the World Health Organization certified the global eradication of the disease in 1980.[10] The risk of death following contracting the disease was about 30%, with higher rates among babies.[6][11] Often those who survive have extensive scarring of their skin and some are left blind.[6] The initial symptoms of the disease include fever and vomiting.[5] This is then followed by formation of sores in
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