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André Previn
André George Previn, KBE (/ˈprɛvɪn/; born Andreas Ludwig Priwin; April 6, 1929)[1] is a German-American pianist, conductor, and composer
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Order Of The British Empire
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
British Empire
is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions
Dominions
of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
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Hank Jones
Henry "Hank" Jones Jr. (July 31, 1918 – May 16, 2010)[1] was an American jazz pianist, bandleader, arranger, and composer. Critics and musicians described Jones as eloquent, lyrical, and impeccable.[2] In 1989, The National Endowment for the Arts
National Endowment for the Arts
honored him with the NEA Jazz
Jazz
Masters Award.[3] He was also honored in 2003 with the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) Jazz
Jazz
Living Legend Award.[4] In 2008, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts. On April 13, 2009, the University of Hartford
University of Hartford
presented Jones with a Doctorate Degree for his musical accomplishments. Jones recorded more than 60 albums under his own name, and countless others as a sideman,[5] including Cannonball Adderley's celebrated album Somethin' Else
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Gershwin
George Jacob Gershwin (/ˈɡɜːrʃ.wɪn/; September 26, 1898 – July 11, 1937) was an American composer and pianist.[1][2] Gershwin's compositions spanned both popular and classical genres, and his most popular melodies are widely known. Among his best-known works are the orchestral compositions Rhapsody in Blue
Rhapsody in Blue
(1924) and An American in Paris
Paris
(1928), as well as the contemporary opera Porgy and Bess
Porgy and Bess
(1935). Gershwin studied piano under Charles Hambitzer
Charles Hambitzer
and composition with Rubin Goldmark, Henry Cowell
Henry Cowell
and Joseph Brody. He began his career as a song plugger, but soon started composing Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
works with his brother Ira Gershwin
Ira Gershwin
and Buddy DeSylva
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Mozart
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
(/ˈwʊlfɡæŋ æməˈdeɪəs ˈmoʊtsɑːrt/ MOHT-sart;[1] German: [ˈvɔlfɡaŋ amaˈdeːʊs ˈmoːtsaʁt]; 27 January 1756 – 5 December 1791), baptised as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart,[2] was a prolific and influential composer of the classical era. Born in Salzburg, Mozart showed prodigious ability from his earliest childhood. Already competent on keyboard and violin, he composed from the age of five and performed before European royalty. At 17, Mozart was engaged as a musician at the Salzburg
Salzburg
court, but grew restless and traveled in search of a better position. While visiting Vienna
Vienna
in 1781, he was dismissed from his Salzburg
Salzburg
position
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Bill Evans
William John Evans ( /ˈɛvəns/, August 16, 1929 – September 15, 1980) was an American jazz pianist and composer who mostly worked in a trio setting.[2] Evans' use of impressionist harmony, inventive interpretation of traditional jazz repertoire, block chords, and trademark rhythmically independent, "singing" melodic lines continue to influence jazz pianists today. Born in Plainfield, New Jersey, in 1929, he was classically trained, and studied at Southeastern Louisiana University
Southeastern Louisiana University
and the Mannes School of Music, where he majored in composition and received the Artist Diploma. In 1955, he moved to New York City, where he worked with bandleader and theorist George Russell. In 1958, Evans joined Miles Davis's sextet, where he was to have a profound influence
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Presidio Of San Francisco
The Presidio
Presidio
of San Francisco
San Francisco
(originally, El Presidio
Presidio
Real de San Francisco or The Royal Fortress of Saint Francis) is a park and former U.S. Army
U.S. Army
military fort on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula in San Francisco, California, and is part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.Welcome signIt had been a fortified location since September 17, 1776, when New Spain
Spain
established it to gain a foothold in Alta California
California
and the San Francisco Bay. It passed to Mexico, which in turn passed it to the United States
United States
in 1848.[6] As part of a 1989 military reduction program under the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) process, Congress voted to end the Presidio's status as an active military installation of the U.S. Army
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Horace Silver
Horace Ward Martin Tavares Silver[note 1] (September 2, 1928 – June 18, 2014) was an American jazz pianist, composer, and arranger, particularly in the hard bop style that he helped pioneer in the 1950s. After playing tenor saxophone and piano at school in Connecticut, Silver got his break on piano when his trio was recruited by Stan Getz in 1950. Silver soon moved to New York City, where he developed a reputation as a composer and for his bluesy playing. Frequent sideman recordings in the mid-1950s helped further, but it was his work with the Jazz
Jazz
Messengers, co-led by Art Blakey, that brought both his writing and playing most attention. Their Horace Silver
Horace Silver
and the Jazz Messengers album contained Silver's first hit, "The Preacher". After leaving Blakey in 1956, Silver formed his own quintet, with what became the standard small group line-up of tenor saxophone, trumpet, piano, bass, and drums
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Berlin
Berlin
Berlin
(/bɜːrˈlɪn/, German: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital and the largest city of Germany, as well as one of its 16 constituent states. With a steadily growing population of approximately 3.7 million,[4] Berlin
Berlin
is the second most populous city proper in the European Union
European Union
behind London
London
and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany
Germany
on the banks of the rivers Spree
Spree
and Havel, it is the centre of the Berlin- Brandenburg
Brandenburg
Metropolitan Region, which has roughly 6 million residents from more than 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin
Berlin
is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate
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My Fair Lady
My Fair Lady
My Fair Lady
is a musical based on George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion, with book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner
Alan Jay Lerner
and music by Frederick Loewe. The story concerns Eliza Doolittle, a Cockney
Cockney
flower girl who takes speech lessons from professor Henry Higgins, a phoneticist, so that she may pass as a lady. The original Broadway and London shows starred Rex Harrison
Rex Harrison
and Julie Andrews. The musical's 1956 Broadway production was a notable critical and popular success. It set a record for the longest run of any show on Broadway up to that time. It was followed by a hit London production, a popular film version, chart topping original cast and soundtrack albums and numerous revivals
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The Ford Show
The Ford Show
The Ford Show
(also known as The Ford Show, Starring Tennessee Ernie Ford and The Tennessee Ernie Ford
Tennessee Ernie Ford
Show) is an American variety program, starring singer and folk humorist Tennessee Ernie Ford, which aired on NBC
NBC
on Thursday evenings from October 4, 1956, to June 29, 1961. The show was actually named for sponsor Ford Motor Company.[2] Beginning in September 1958, the show began to be telecast in color. Ford first gained attention as the host of Hometown Jamboree in Los Angeles. In 1954, he hosted a brief revival of Kay Kyser's Kollege of Musical Knowledge, a quiz show on NBC. His subsequent The Ford Show was frequently among the Top 20 programs, finishing in the Nielsen ratings at #19 for the 1956-1957 season, #14 in 1957-1958, #20 in 1958-1959, #14 in 1959-1960 and #24 in 1960-1961.[3] It's also one of the first places that showed Charles M
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Christmas Carol
A Christmas
Christmas
carol (also called a noël, from the French word meaning "Christmas") is a carol (song or hymn) whose lyrics are on the theme of Christmas, and which is traditionally sung on Christmas
Christmas
itself or during the surrounding holiday season
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Jerome Kern
Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of musical theatre and popular music. One of the most important American theatre composers of the early 20th century, he wrote more than 700 songs, used in over 100 stage works, including such classics as "Ol' Man River", "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man", "A Fine Romance", "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes", "All the Things You Are", "The Way You Look Tonight", "Long Ago (and Far Away)" and "Who?". He collaborated with many of the leading librettists and lyricists of his era, including George Grossmith Jr., Guy Bolton, P. G. Wodehouse, Otto Harbach, Oscar Hammerstein II, Dorothy Fields, Johnny Mercer, Ira Gershwin and E. Y
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Frederick Loewe
Frederick Loewe (/ˈloʊ/,[1] originally German Friedrich (Fritz)[2] Löwe [ˈløːvə]; June 10, 1901 – February 14, 1988[3]), was an Austrian-American composer. He collaborated with lyricist Alan Jay Lerner on a series of Broadway musicals, including My Fair Lady
My Fair Lady
and Camelot, both of which were made into films.Contents1 Biography 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Loewe was born in Berlin, Germany, to Viennese parents Edmond and Rosa Loewe. His father was a noted Jewish
Jewish
operetta star who performed throughout Europe and in North and South America; he starred as Count Danilo in the 1906 Berlin
Berlin
production of The Merry Widow.[4] Frederick Loewe grew up in Berlin
Berlin
and attended a Prussian cadet school from the age of five until he was thirteen
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Vernon Duke
Vernon Duke
Vernon Duke
(10 October [O.S. 27 September] 1903 – 16 January 1969) was an American composer/songwriter, who also wrote under his original name, Vladimir Dukelsky. He is best known for "Taking a Chance on Love" with lyrics by Ted Fetter
Ted Fetter
and John Latouche (1940), "I Can't Get Started" with lyrics by Ira Gershwin
Ira Gershwin
(1936), "April in Paris" with lyrics by E. Y. ("Yip") Harburg (1932), and "What Is There To Say" for the Ziegfeld Follies
Ziegfeld Follies
of 1934, also with Harburg
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Harold Arlen
Harold Arlen
Harold Arlen
(born Hyman Arluck; February 15, 1905 – April 23, 1986) was an American composer of popular music who composed over 500 songs, a number of which have become known worldwide. In addition to composing the songs for the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz (lyrics by E.Y. Harburg), including the classic "Over the Rainbow", Arlen is a highly regarded contributor to the Great American Songbook. "Over the Rainbow" was voted the 20th century's No. 1 song by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).[2][3]Contents1 Life and career 2 Timeline 3 Works for Broadway 4 Major songs 5 Films 6 Biographies 7 References 8 External linksLife and career[edit] Arlen was born in Buffalo, New York, United States, the child of a cantor. His twin brother died the next day. He learned to play the piano as a youth, and formed a band as a young man
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