HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1500] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Ancient Woodland
In the United Kingdom , an ANCIENT WOODLAND is a woodland that has existed continuously since 1600 or before in England , Wales and Northern Ireland (or 1750 in Scotland ). Before those dates, planting of new woodland was uncommon, so a wood present in 1600 was likely to have developed naturally. In most ancient woods, the trees and shrubs have been cut down periodically as part of the management cycle. Provided that the area has remained as woodland, the stand is still considered ancient. Since it may have been cut over many times in the past, ancient woodland does not necessarily contain very old trees. For many species of animal and plant, ancient woodland sites provide the sole habitat, and for many others, conditions on these sites are much more suitable than those on other sites. Ancient woodland in the UK, like rainforest in the tropics, is home to rare and threatened species. For these reasons ancient woodland is often described as an irreplaceable resource, or 'critical natural capital '. Ancient woodland is formally defined on maps by Natural England and equivalent bodies. Mapping of ancient woodland has been undertaken in different ways and at different times, and the quality and availability of data varies from region to region, although there are some efforts to standardise and update it
[...More...]

"Ancient Woodland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brading
The ancient 'Kynges Towne' of BRADING is the main town of the civil parish of the same name. The ecclesiastical parish of Brading
Brading
used to cover about a tenth of the Isle of Wight . The civil parish now includes the town itself and Adgestone , Morton , Nunwell and other outlying areas between Ryde , St Helens , Bembridge , Sandown
Sandown
and Arreton . Alverstone was transferred to the Newchurch parish some thirty years ago. CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Early history * 1.2 Royal charter and governance * 1.3 The old port * 1.4 The Town Hall * 1.5 The Bull Ring * 1.6 The Town Gun * 2 Governance * 3 Wildlife and landscape * 4 Transport * 5 Features of the town * 6 Sport and leisure * 7 Famous connections * 8 Abroad * 9 See also * 10 References * 11 External links HISTORYEARLY HISTORYFrom early times, Brading
Brading
ranked as an important Island port. The ancient name of Brerdynge, from which 'Brading' is derived, probably meant the people living by the ridge of the Downs , and dates from at least 683. Main article: Brading Roman Villa The Roman Villa south of the town, and Roman relics discovered locally, indicate that this was an important seaport 2,000 years ago. Signs of prehistoric activity have also been found on Brading Down
[...More...]

"Brading" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Isle Of Wight
The ISLE OF WIGHT /ˈaɪl əv ˈwaɪt/ (referred to informally as IoW ) is a county and the largest and second-most populous island in England. It is in the English Channel , about 4 miles (6 km) off the coast of Hampshire
Hampshire
, separated by the Solent . The island has resorts that have been holiday destinations since Victorian times , and is known for its mild climate, coastal scenery, and verdant landscape of fields, downland and chines . The island has been home to the poets Swinburne and Tennyson and to Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House at East Cowes . It has a maritime and industrial tradition including boat-building, sail-making, the manufacture of flying boats , the hovercraft , and Britain's space rockets. The island hosts annual music festivals including the Isle of Wight Festival , which in 1970 was the largest rock music event ever held. It has well-conserved wildlife and some of the richest cliffs and quarries for dinosaur fossils in Europe. The Isle was owned by a Norman family until 1293 and was earlier a kingdom in its own right
[...More...]

"Isle Of Wight" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

England
ENGLAND is a country that is part of the United Kingdom . It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain (which lies in the North Atlantic ) in its centre and south; and includes over 100 smaller islands such as the Isles of Scilly , and the Isle of Wight . The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles , one of the Germanic tribes who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery , which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language , the Anglican Church , and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations
[...More...]

"England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Common Bluebell
HYACINTHOIDES NON-SCRIPTA (formerly Endymion non-scriptus or Scilla non-scripta) is a bulbous perennial plant , found in Atlantic areas from north-western Spain
Spain
to the British Isles
British Isles
, and also frequently used as a garden plant . It is known in English as the COMMON BLUEBELL or simply BLUEBELL, a name which is used in Scotland to refer to the harebell, Campanula rotundifolia
Campanula rotundifolia
. In spring, H. non-scripta produces a nodding, one-sided inflorescence of 5–12 tubular, sweet-scented violet–blue flowers, with strongly recurved tepals , and 3–6 long, linear, basal leaves. H. non-scripta is particularly associated with ancient woodland where it may dominate the understorey to produce carpets of violet–blue flowers in "bluebell woods ", but also occurs in more open habitats in western regions. It is protected under UK law, and in some other parts of its range. A related species, H. hispanica has also been introduced to the British Isles
British Isles
and hybridises with H. non-scripta to produce intermediates known as H. × massartiana
[...More...]

"Common Bluebell" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ramsons
ALLIUM URSINUM – known as RAMSONS, BUCKRAMS, WILD GARLIC, BROAD-LEAVED GARLIC, WOOD GARLIC, BEAR LEEK, or BEAR\'S GARLIC – is a wild relative of chives native to Europe and Asia. The Latin name is due to the brown bear 's taste for the bulbs and its habit of digging up the ground to get at them; they are also a favourite of wild boar . In Europe, where ramsons are popularly harvested from the wild, similarity to poisonous plants such as lily of the valley or Colchicum autumnale regularly leads to cases of poisoning. CONTENTS * 1 Description * 2 Distribution * 3 Habitat * 4 Edibility * 4.1 Similarity to poisonous plants * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links DESCRIPTION Allium ursinum is a bulbous, perennial herbaceous monocot, that reproduces primarily by seed. The narrow bulbs are formed from a single leaf base and produce bright green entire, elliptical leaves up to 25 cm long x 7 cm wide with a petiole up to 20 cm long. The inflorescence is an umbel of six to 20 white flowers only, lacking the bulbils produced by some other Allium species such as Allium vineale (crow garlic) and Allium oleraceum (field garlic). :394 :902 The flowers are star-like with six white tepals , about 16–20 mm in diameter, with stamens shorter than the perianth. It flowers in the British Isles from April to June, :394 starting before deciduous trees leaf in the spring
[...More...]

"Ramsons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Corylus Avellana
CORYLUS AVELLANA, the COMMON HAZEL, is a species of hazel native to Europe
Europe
and western Asia
Asia
, from the British Isles
British Isles
south to Iberia , Greece
Greece
, Turkey
Turkey
and Cyprus
Cyprus
, north to central Scandinavia
Scandinavia
, and east to the central Ural Mountains , the Caucasus
Caucasus
, and northwestern Iran
Iran
. It is an important component of the hedgerows that were the traditional field boundaries in lowland England. The wood was traditionally grown as coppice , the poles cut being used for wattle-and-daub building and agricultural fencing. Common hazel is cultivated for its nuts. The name hazelnut applies to the nuts of any of the species of the genus Corylus . This hazelnut or COB NUT, the kernel of the seed , is edible and used raw or roasted, or ground into a paste. The cob is round, compared with the longer filbert nut. CONTENTS * 1 Description * 2 Taxonomy * 3 Ecology * 4 Cultivation and uses * 5 Hazelnuts * 6 References * 7 External links DESCRIPTION Male catkins on common hazel Common hazel is typically a shrub reaching 3–8 m tall, but can reach 15 m. The leaves are deciduous , rounded, 6–12 cm long and across, softly hairy on both surfaces, and with a double-serrate margin
[...More...]

"Corylus Avellana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United Kingdom
The UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND, commonly known as the UNITED KINGDOM (UK) or BRITAIN, is a sovereign country in western Europe. Lying off the north-western coast of the European mainland , the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
includes the island of Great Britain
Great Britain
, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland
Ireland
and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is the only part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
that shares a land border with another sovereign state‍—‌the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
, with the North Sea to its east, the English Channel to its south and the Celtic Sea to its south-south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world . The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland. With an area of 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi), the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is the 78th-largest sovereign state in the world and the 11th-largest in Europe
Europe
. It is also the 21st-most populous country , with an estimated 65.1 million inhabitants
[...More...]

"United Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Woodland
WOODLAND /ˈwʊdlənd/ ( listen ) is a low-density forest forming open habitats with plenty of sunlight and limited shade. Woodlands may support an understory of shrubs and herbaceous plants including grasses . Woodland may form a transition to shrubland under drier conditions or during early stages of primary or secondary succession . Higher density areas of trees with a largely closed canopy that provides extensive and nearly continuous shade are referred to as forests . Conservationists have worked hard to preserve woodlands, because people are destroying animal habitats when building homes and other buildings. For example, the woodlands in Northwest Indiana have been preserved as part of the Indiana Dunes
[...More...]

"Woodland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wales
WALES (/ˈweɪlz/ (_ listen ); Welsh : Cymru_ (_ listen )) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the island of Great Britain . It is bordered by England
England
to the east , the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales
Wales
has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon
Snowdon
(Yr Wyddfa_), its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate . Welsh national identity emerged among the Celtic Britons after the Roman withdrawal from Britain in the 5th century, and Wales
Wales
is regarded as one of the modern Celtic nations . Llywelyn ap Gruffudd 's death in 1282 marked the completion of Edward I
Edward I
of England
England
's conquest of Wales, though Owain Glyndŵr briefly restored independence to Wales in the early 15th century. The whole of Wales
Wales
was annexed by England and incorporated within the English legal system under the Laws in Wales
Wales
Acts 1535–1542
[...More...]

"Wales" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Northern Ireland
NORTHERN IRELAND (Irish : _Tuaisceart Éireann_ (_ listen ); Ulster-Scots : Norlin Airlann_) is a country of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
located in the north-east of the island of Ireland
Ireland
. It has been variously described as a country, province, region, or "part" of the United Kingdom, amongst other terms. Northern Ireland
Ireland
shares a border to the south and west with the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
. In 2011 , its population was 1,810,863, constituting about 30% of the island's total population and about 3% of the UK\'s population . Established by the Northern Ireland Act 1998 as part of the Good Friday Agreement , the Northern Ireland Assembly holds responsibility for a range of devolved policy matters, while other areas are reserved for the British government
British government
. Northern Ireland
Ireland
co-operates with the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
in some areas, and the Agreement granted the Republic the ability to "put forward views and proposals" with "determined efforts to resolve disagreements between the two governments"
[...More...]

"Northern Ireland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scotland
SCOTLAND (/ˈskɒt.lənd/ ; Scots : ; Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
: _ Alba
Alba
_ ( listen )) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain
Great Britain
. It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides
Hebrides
. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages and continued to exist until 1707. By inheritance in 1603, James VI , King of Scots , became King of England and King of Ireland
Ireland
, thus forming a personal union of the three kingdoms . Scotland
Scotland
subsequently entered into a political union with the Kingdom of England
England
on 1 May 1707 to create the new Kingdom of Great Britain
Great Britain

[...More...]

"Scotland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rainforest
RAINFORESTS are forests characterized by high rainfall , with annual rainfall in the case of tropical rainforests between 250 and 450 centimetres (98 and 177 in), and definitions varying by region for temperate rainforests . The monsoon trough , alternatively known as the intertropical convergence zone , plays a significant role in creating the climatic conditions necessary for the Earth 's tropical rainforests. Around 40% to 75% of all biotic species are indigenous to the rainforests. It has been estimated that there may be many millions of species of plants, insects and microorganisms still undiscovered in tropical rainforests. Tropical rainforests have been called the "jewels of the Earth" and the "world\'s largest pharmacy ", because over one quarter of natural medicines have been discovered there. Rainforests are also responsible for 28% of the world's oxygen turnover, sometimes misnamed oxygen production, processing it through photosynthesis from carbon dioxide and consuming it through respiration. The undergrowth in some areas of a rainforest can be restricted by poor penetration of sunlight to ground level. If the leaf canopy is destroyed or thinned, the ground beneath is soon colonized by a dense, tangled growth of vines , shrubs and small trees , called a jungle . The term _jungle_ is also sometimes applied to tropical rainforests generally
[...More...]

"Rainforest" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Natural Capital
NATURAL CAPITAL is the world's stock of natural resources , which includes geology, soils, air, water and all living organisms. Some natural capital assets provide people with free goods and services, often called ecosystem services . Two of these (clean water and fertile soil) underpin our economy and society and make human life possible. Of course, the vast majority of living organisms and much of the plant's geology, contribute nothing positive to human well-being and so, technically speaking, are not "natural capital", as they have no value to human society. It is an extension of the economic notion of capital (resources which enable the production of more resources) to goods and services provided by the natural environment. For example, a well-maintained forest or river may provide an indefinitely sustainable flow of new trees or fish, whereas over-use of those resources may lead to a permanent decline in timber availability or fish stocks. Natural capital also provides people with essential services, like water catchment, erosion control and crop pollination by insects, which in turn ensure the long-term viability of other natural resources. Since the continuous supply of services from the available natural capital assets is dependent upon a healthy, functioning environment, the structure and diversity of habitats and ecosystems are important components of natural capital
[...More...]

"Natural Capital" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Natural England
NATURAL ENGLAND is a non-departmental public body in the United Kingdom sponsored by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs . It is responsible for ensuring that England 's natural environment, including its land, flora and fauna , freshwater and marine environments , geology and soils, are protected and improved. It also has a responsibility to help people enjoy, understand and access the natural environment . Natural England focuses its activities and resources on four strategic outcomes: * a healthy natural environment * enjoyment of the natural environment * sustainable use of the natural environment * a secure environmental futureCONTENTS * 1 Roles and responsibilities * 2 History * 3 Activities * 3.1 State of the Natural Environment * 3.2 Green exercise * 3.3 Green infrastructure * 4 Legal challenge * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIESAs a non-departmental public body (NDPB), Natural England is independent of government. However, the Secretary of State for Environment, Food "> * ^ _A_ _B_ _C_ _D_ "Annual Report and Accounts 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2015". Natural England. ISBN 9781474117852 . Retrieved 19 November 2015. * ^ _A_ _B_ "Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006". Legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 17 March 2013. * ^ "Corporate plans". Natural England. Retrieved 26 January 2016
[...More...]

"Natural England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sites Of Special Scientific Interest
A SITE OF SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC INTEREST (SSSI) in Great Britain
Great Britain
or an AREA OF SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC INTEREST (ASSI) in the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Isle of Man. SSSI/ASSIs are the basic building block of site-based nature conservation legislation and most other legal nature/geological conservation designations in the United Kingdom are based upon them, including national nature reserves , Ramsar sites , Special
Special
Protection Areas , and Special
Special
Areas of Conservation . The acronym "SSSI" is often pronounced "triple-S I". CONTENTS* 1 Selection and conservation * 1.1 Biological
Biological
* 1.2 Geological * 2 Legal status * 3 Notification * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 Further reading * 7 External links SELECTION AND CONSERVATIONSites notified for their biological interest are known as Biological SSSIs (or ASSIs), and those notified for geological or physiographic interest are Geological SSSIs (or ASSIs). Sites may be divided into management units, with some areas including units that are noted for both biological and geological interest