HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ISO 639-3
ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1] ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages
[...More...]

"ISO 639-3" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pluricentric Language
A pluricentric language or polycentric language is a language with several interacting codified standard versions, often corresponding to different countries.[1][2][3] Examples include English, French, Portuguese, German, Korean, Spanish, Swedish, Armenian and Chinese.[4] A language that has only one formally standardized version is monocentric
[...More...]

"Pluricentric Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Language Family
A language family is a group of languages related through descent from a common ancestral language or parental language, called the proto-language of that family. The term "family" reflects the tree model of language origination in historical linguistics, which makes use of a metaphor comparing languages to people in a biological family tree, or in a subsequent modification, to species in a phylogenetic tree of evolutionary taxonomy. Linguists therefore describe the daughter languages within a language family as being genetically related.[1] According to Ethnologue
Ethnologue
the 7,099 living human languages are distributed in 141 different language families.[2] A "living language" is simply one that is used as the primary form of communication of a group of people
[...More...]

"Language Family" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ISO 639-2
 ISO 639-2:1998, Codes for the representation of names of languages — Part 2: Alpha-3 code, is the second part of the ISO 639 standard, which lists codes for the representation of the names of languages. The three-letter codes given for each language in this part of the standard are referred to as "Alpha-3" codes. There are 464 entries in the list of ISO 639-2 codes. The US Library of Congress
Library of Congress
is the registration authority for ISO 639-2 (referred to as ISO 639-2/RA)
[...More...]

"ISO 639-2" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
[...More...]

"Glottolog" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mediterranean Sea
The Mediterranean Sea
Sea
is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin
Mediterranean Basin
and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe
Southern Europe
and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa
North Africa
and on the east by the Levant. Although the sea is sometimes considered a part of the Atlantic Ocean, it is usually identified as a separate body of water
[...More...]

"Mediterranean Sea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lesbos
Lesbos
Lesbos
(/ˈlɛzbɒs/, US: /ˈlɛzboʊs/; Greek: Λέσβος Lesvos, pronounced [ˈlezvos]), sometimes referred to as Mytilene
Mytilene
after its capital, is a Greek island located in the northeastern Aegean Sea. It has an area of 1,633 km2 (631 sq mi)[1] with 320 kilometres (199 miles) of coastline, making it the third largest island in Greece. It is separated from Turkey
Turkey
by the narrow Mytilini Strait and in late Palaeolithic/Mesolithic times[2] was joined to the Anatolian mainland before the end of the last glacial period. Lesbos
Lesbos
is also the name of a regional unit of the North Aegean
North Aegean
region, within which Lesbos
Lesbos
island is one of five governing islands. The others are Chios, Ikaria, Lemnos, and Samos
[...More...]

"Lesbos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Greek (other)
Greek
Greek
may refer to: Greece[edit] Anything of, from, or related to Greece, a country in Southern Europe:Greeks, an ethnic group Greek
Greek
language, a branch of the Indo-European language familyProto- Greek
Greek
language, the assumed last common ancestor of all known varieties of Greek Mycenaean Greek
Greek
language, most ancient attested form of the language (16th to 11th centuries AD) Ancient Greek, forms of the language used c
[...More...]

"Greek (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Writing System
A writing system is any conventional method of visually representing verbal communication. While both writing and speech are useful in conveying messages, writing differs in also being a reliable form of information storage and transfer.[1] The processes of encoding and decoding writing systems involve shared understanding between writers and readers of the meaning behind the sets of characters that make up a script. Writing
Writing
is usually recorded onto a durable medium, such as paper or electronic storage, although non-durable methods may also be used, such as writing on a computer display, on a blackboard, in sand, or by skywriting. The general attributes of writing systems can be placed into broad categories such as alphabets, syllabaries, or logographies. Any particular system can have attributes of more than one category
[...More...]

"Writing System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
[...More...]

"Renaissance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Achaean Doric Greek
Achaean Doric Greek may refer to:Contents1 Doric of Achaea 2 Achaean Doric Koine 3 References 4 SourcesDoric of Achaea[edit]The Doric Greek dialect spoken in Achaea
Achaea
in the NW Peloponnese, on the islands of Cephalonia
Cephalonia
and Zakynthos
Zakynthos
in the Ionian Sea and in the Achaean colonies of Magna Graecia
Magna Graecia
in Southern Italy (including Sybaris and Crotone). This strict Doric dialect was later subject to the influence of mild Doric spoken in Corinthia. It survived to 350 BC.[3] According to Hesychius, Achaeans means "the Greeks but foremost those inhabiting part of the Peloponnese, called Achaea",[4] and he gives these words under the ethnic Achaeans:καιρότερον kairoteron (Attic: ἐνωρότερον enôroteron) "earlier" (kairos time, enôros early cf
[...More...]

"Achaean Doric Greek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Proto-Indo-European Language
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
[...More...]

"Proto-Indo-European Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Boeotia
Boeotia, sometimes alternatively Latinised as Boiotia, or Beotia (/biˈoʊʃiə, -ʃə/; Greek: Βοιωτία, Modern Greek: [vi.oˈti.a], Ancient Greek: [bojɔːtía]; modern transliteration Voiotía, also Viotía, formerly Cadmeis), is one of the regional units of Greece. It is part of the region of Central Greece
[...More...]

"Boeotia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Athena Parthenos
Athena
Athena
Parthenos (Ancient Greek: Ἀθηνᾶ Παρθένος; literally, " Athena
Athena
the Virgin") is a lost massive chryselephantine (gold and ivory) sculpture of the Greek goddess Athena, made by Phidias
Phidias
and his assistants and housed in the Parthenon
Parthenon
in Athens. Despite the dynamic architectural characteristics of the Parthenon, the statue of Athena
Athena
was designed to be the focal point.[1] Its epithet was an essential character of the goddess herself. A number of replicas and works inspired by it, both ancient and modern, have been made. It was the most renowned cult image of Athens,[note 1] considered one of the greatest achievements of the most acclaimed sculptor of ancient Greece
[...More...]

"Athena Parthenos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Western World
The Western world, or simply the West (from Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
root wes-; Ancient Greek: Ἓσπερος /ˈhɛspərʊs/, Hesperos,[1] "towards evening") refers to various nations depending on the context, most often including at least part of Europe. There are many accepted definitions, all closely interrelated.[2] The Western world
Western world
is also known as the Occident (from Latin
Latin
word occidens, "sunset, West"). The East and the Orient
Orient
are terms used as contraries. Ancient Greece[a][b] and ancient Rome[c] are generally considered to be the birthplaces of Western civilization, the former due to its impact on Western philosophy, democracy, science, art, and the ancient Roman culture, the latter due to its influence in governance, republicanism, law, architecture and warfare
[...More...]

"Western World" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.