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Ancestral Shrine
An ancestral shrine, hall or temple (Chinese: 祠堂; pinyin: Cítáng or Chinese: 宗祠; pinyin: Zōng Cí), also called lineage temple, is a Chinese temple
Chinese temple
dedicated to deified ancestors and progenitors of surname lineages or families in the Chinese traditional religion. Ancestral temples are closely linked to Confucian culture and the emphasis that it places on filial piety. A common central feature of the ancestral temples are the ancestral tablets that embody the ancestral spirits.[1] The ancestral tablets are typically arranged by seniority of the ancestors.[1] Altars and
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King Law Ka Shuk
King Law Ka Shuk
King Law Ka Shuk
(Chinese: 敬羅家塾) is a historical building situated in Tai Po
Tai Po
Tau Tsuen, Tai Po, New Territories, Hong Kong, China. In the past, it was used as an ancestral hall to hold meetings and traditional functions in the village and it is now in full use as a local meeting place.[1] The building was named after Tang King Law, who was one of the ancestors of Tang's Family (or Tang Clan). It occupies a total area of 349.69 square metres (3,764.0 sq ft). It was declared as a monument, under the full legal protection of the Hong Kong SAR Government, on 21 July 1998.[2] The temple was constructed in the early 18th century. Apart from being an ancestral hall for people to show respect to their ancestors and hold clan meetings, it was also a study hall for the Tang clans, who were taught with a Chinese traditional teaching method known as Bok Bok Chai
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Filial Piety
In Confucian philosophy, filial piety (Chinese: 孝, xiào) is a virtue of respect for one's parents, elders, and ancestors. The Confucian Classic of Filial Piety, thought to be written around the Qin-Han period, has historically been the authoritative source on the Confucian tenet of filial piety. The book, a purported dialogue between Confucius
Confucius
and his student Zengzi, is about how to set up a good society using the principle of filial piety. The term can also be applied to general obedience
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Lai (Chinese Surname)
Lai (simplified Chinese: 赖; traditional Chinese: 賴; pinyin: Lài) is a common Chinese surname
Chinese surname
that is pronounced similarly in both Mandarin and Hakka dialect. The meaning of the character used in the Lai (賴) surname is "depend on; trust in; rely on". It is also a Hokkien (Fujian)/ Minnan (Southern Min) surname that is romanized as Luā or Loa
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Tianzhong, Changhua
Coordinates: 23°51′34″N 120°35′16″E / 23.859466°N 120.587799°E / 23.859466; 120.587799 Tianzhong
Tianzhong
Township in Changhua
Changhua
County Tianzhong
Tianzhong
TownshipChinese 田中鎮Hanyu Pinyin Tiánzhōng ZhènWade–Giles Tien2chung1 Chen4Pha̍k-fa-sṳ Thièn-chûng-chṳ́n Hokkien
Hokkien
POJ Chhân-tiong-tìn Tianzhong
Tianzhong
Township[1] is an urban township located at eastern Changhua County, Taiwan
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Chen (surname)
Chen ([ʈʂʰə̌n]) (simplified Chinese: 陈; traditional Chinese: 陳; pinyin: Chén; Wade–Giles: Ch'en) is one of the most common East Asian surnames of Chinese origin. It ranks as the 5th most common surname in China
China
as of 2007[1] and the most common surname in Singapore
Singapore
(2000)[2] and Taiwan
Taiwan
(2010).[3] Chen is also the most common family name in Guangdong, Zhejiang, Fujian, Hong Kong
Hong Kong
(spelled Chan in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Macau). It is the most common surname in Xiamen, the ancestral hometown of many overseas Hoklo.[4] Besides 陳/陈, an uncommon Chinese surname
Chinese surname
諶/谌 (Shen) sometimes is romanized as Chen because of mispronunciation.[5][6]). It is usually romanised as Chan in Cantonese, most widely used by those from Hong Kong, and sometimes as Chun
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Changhua County
Changhua
Changhua
County (Chinese: 彰化縣; pinyin: Zhānghuà Xiàn) is the smallest county on the main island of Taiwan
Taiwan
by area, and the fourth smallest in the country
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Liang (surname)
Liang[1] ( Romanization
Romanization
used in China, Chinese: 梁) is an East Asian surname of Chinese origin. Meaning "a beam", "a bridge", or "an elevation", or "a mast",[2] the surname is often transliterated as Leung (in Hong Kong) or Leong (in Macau, Malaysia, and Singapore) according to its Cantonese
Cantonese
and Hakka pronunciation, Neo / Nio / Niu (Hokkien, Teochew, Hainan), or Liong (Foochow). To Indonesia, it is known as Liang or Nio. It is also common in Korea, where it is written Yang 양 or Ryang 량 . In Vietnam, it's pronounced as Lương.Contents1 History 2 Notable people with the surname 梁2.1 Chinese 2.2 Filipino 2.3 Vietnamese3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first Liang was Liang Kang (梁康)and was conferred the title "Bo" or "伯" (third ranking noble- equivalent to a Count or Earl) who was the ruler of the State of Liang, in what is now Shaanxi Province in the northwestern part of China
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Ping Shan Heritage Trail
Ping Shan Heritage Trail (Chinese: 屏山文物徑) is a heritage trail located in the Ping Shan area of Yuen Long District, in Hong Kong. The trail was inaugurated on 12 December 1993 and was the first of its kind in Hong Kong.[1] It passes through the villages of Hang Tau Tsuen, Hang Mei Tsuen and Sheung Cheung Wai and it includes several declared monuments and graded buildings. The Ping Shan Tang Clan Gallery and Heritage Trail Visitors Centre was opened in 2007
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Ye (surname)
Yè (Mandarin) Yip (Cantonese) Yap (Hakka, Hokkien) Diệp (Vietnamese)Language(s) Chinese, VietnameseOriginLanguage(s) Old ChineseWord/Name City of Ye, State of ChuMeaning leafOther namesVariant(s) Yeh, Yip, Ip, Yap, Yapp, YeapDerivative(s) DiệpYe is the pinyin romanization of the Chinese surname
Chinese surname
written 葉 in traditional character and 叶 in simplified character. It is listed 257th in the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
classic text Hundred Family Surnames,[1] and is the 42nd most common surname in China, with a population of 5.8 million as of 2008.[2] Ye is also romanized Yeh in Wade-Giles; Yip, Ip, and Jip in Cantonese; Iap, Yap, Yapp, and Yeap in Hakka and Minnan.[3]Contents1 Pronunciation 2 Distribution 3 Origin 4 Notable people 5 References 6 External linksPronunciation[edit] In Middle Chinese, Ye (葉) was pronounced Sjep (IPA: [ɕiɛp])
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Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Hong Kong
(Cantonese: [hœ́ːŋ.kɔ̌ːŋ] ( listen)), officially the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Special
Special
Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is an autonomous territory on the eastern side of the Pearl River estuary in East Asia. Along with Macau, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, and several other major cities in Guangdong, the territory forms a core part of the Pearl River Delta
Pearl River Delta
metropolitan region, the most populated area in the world
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Yu (Chinese Surname)
Yu is the pinyin romanisation of several Chinese family names. However, in the Wade–Giles romanisation system, Yu is equivalent to You in pinyin. "Yu" may represent many different Chinese characters, including 余, 于, 由, 魚 (鱼), 漁, 渔, 楀, 俞, 喻, 兪, 於, 遇, 虞, 郁, 尉, 禹, 游, 尤, 庾, 娛, 娱, and 茹. Yu is also a common Korean family name (also romanised as Yoo or Ryu) and may represent these characters: 劉, 兪, 庾, 柳. The most common of the Yu surnames are 于, 余, and 俞
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Chinese Economic Reform
The Chinese economic reform
Chinese economic reform
(simplified Chinese: 改革开放; traditional Chinese: 改革開放; pinyin: Gǎigé kāifàng; literally: "reform and opening-up") refers to the program of economic reforms termed "Socialism with Chinese characteristics" in the People's Republic of China
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Cultural Revolution
The Cultural Revolution, formally the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, was a sociopolitical movement in China
China
from 1966 until 1976. Launched by Mao
Mao
Zedong, then Chairman of the Communist Party of China, its stated goal was to preserve 'true' Communist ideology
Communist ideology
in the country by purging remnants of capitalist and traditional elements from Chinese society, and to re-impose Maoist
Maoist
thought as the dominant ideology within the Party. The Revolution
Revolution
marked Mao's return to a position of power after the Great Leap Forward
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Women In Ancient And Imperial China
The study of women's history in the context of imperial China has been pursued since at least the late 1990s.[1] The societal status of both women and men in ancient China was closely related to the Chinese kinship system.[2] Women in ancient and imperial China were restricted from participating in various realms of social life,[3] through social stipulations that they remain indoors, whilst outside business should be conducted by men.[4] The strict division of the sexes, apparent in the policy that "men plow, women weave" (Chinese: 男耕女织), partitioned male and female histories as early as the Zhou dynasty, with the Rites of Zhou even stipulating that women be educated specifically in "women's rites" (Chinese: 陰禮; pinyin: yīnlǐ).[5] Though limited by policies that prevented them from owning property,[6] taking examinations, or holding office,[7] their restriction to a distinctive women's world prompted the development of female-specific occupations, exclusive literary circ
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Spirit Tablet
A spirit tablet, memorial tablet, or ancestral tablet,[1] is a placard used to designate the seat of a deity or past ancestor as well as to enclose it. The name of the deity or past ancestor is usually inscribed onto the tablet. With origins in traditional Chinese culture, the spirit tablet is a common sight in many East Asian countries where any form of ancestor veneration is practiced. Spirit tablets are traditional ritual objects commonly seen in temples, shrines, and household altars throughout China and Taiwan.[2]Contents1 General usage 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 ReferencesGeneral usage[edit] A spirit tablet is often used for deities and ancestors, with shrines found in households or in temples, where there are specific rooms for individual spirit tablets for ancestors. A spirit tablet acts as an effigy of a specific deity or ancestor. When used, incense sticks are usually burned before the tablet
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