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Analog Recording
Analog recording
Analog recording
(Greek, ana is "according to" and logos "relationship") is a technique used for the recording of analog signals which, among many possibilities, allows analog audio and analog video for later playback. Analog audio recording began with mechanical systems such as the phonautograph and phonograph. Later, electronic techniques such as wire recording and tape recorder were developed. Analog recording
Analog recording
methods store signals as a continuous signal in or on the media. The signal may be stored as a physical texture on a phonograph record, or a fluctuation in the field strength of a magnetic recording
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Analog Signal
An analog signal is any continuous signal for which the time varying feature (variable) of the signal is a representation of some other time varying quantity, i.e., analogous to another time varying signal. For example, in an analog audio signal, the instantaneous voltage of the signal varies continuously with the pressure of the sound waves. It differs from a digital signal, in which the continuous quantity is a representation of a sequence of discrete values which can only take on one of a finite number of values.[1][2] The term analog signal usually refers to electrical signals; however, mechanical, pneumatic, hydraulic, human speech, and other systems may also convey or be considered analog signals. An analog signal uses some property of the medium to convey the signal's information. For example, an aneroid barometer uses rotary position as the signal to convey pressure information
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Bandsaw
A bandsaw (also written band saw) is a saw with a long, sharp blade consisting of a continuous band of toothed metal stretched between two or more wheels to cut material. They are used principally in woodworking, metalworking, and lumbering, but may cut a variety of materials. Advantages include uniform cutting action as a result of an evenly distributed tooth load, and the ability to cut irregular or curved shapes like a jigsaw.[1] The minimum radius of a curve is determined by the width of the band and its kerf. Most bandsaws have two wheels rotating in the same plane, one of which is powered, although some may have three or four to distribute the load. The blade itself can come in a variety of sizes and tooth pitches (teeth per inch, or TPI), which enables the machine to be highly versatile and able to cut a wide variety of materials including wood, metal and plastic. Almost all bandsaws today are powered by an electric motor
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Emile Berliner
Emile Berliner
Emile Berliner
(May 20, 1851 – August 3, 1929), originally Emil Berliner, was a German-born American inventor. He is best known for inventing the flat disc phonograph record (called a “gramophone record” in British and American English) and the Gramophone. He founded the United States Gramophone Company
Gramophone Company
in 1894,[1] The Gramophone Company
Gramophone Company
in London, England, in 1897, Deutsche Grammophon
Deutsche Grammophon
in Hanover, Germany, in 1898, Berliner Gram-o-phone Company of Canada in Montreal
Montreal
in 1899 (chartered in 1904), and Victor Talking Machine Company in 1901 with Eldridge Johnson.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Awards 4 Death 5 Publications5.1 Books 5.2 Patents6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Berliner was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1851 into a Jewish merchant family
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Mass Production
Mass production, also known as flow production or continuous production, is the production of large amounts of standardized products, including and especially on assembly lines. Together with job production and batch production, it is one of the three main production methods.[1] The term mass production was popularized by a 1926 article in the Encyclopædia Britannica supplement that was written based on correspondence with Ford Motor Company
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Telegraphone
Valdemar Poulsen (23 November 1869 – 23 July 1942) was a Danish engineer who made significant contributions to early radio technology. He developed a magnetic wire recorder called the telegraphone in 1899 and the first continuous wave radio transmitter, the Poulsen arc transmitter, in 1903, which was used in some of the first broadcasting stations until the early 1920s.Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was born on 23 November 1869 in Copenhagen. The magnetic recording was demonstrated in principle as early as 1898 by Valdemar Poulsen in his telegraphone. Magnetic wire recording, and its successor, magnetic tape recording, involve the use of a magnetizable medium which moves past a recording head. An electrical signal, which is analogous to the sound that is to be recorded, is fed to the recording head, inducing a pattern of magnetization similar to the signal
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Analog Video
Video
Video
is an electronic medium for the recording, copying, playback, broadcasting, and display of moving visual media.[1] Video
Video
was first developed for mechanical television systems, which were quickly replaced by cathode ray tube (CRT) systems which were later replaced by flat panel displays of several types. Video
Video
systems vary in display resolution, aspect ratio, refresh rate, color capabilities and other qualities
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Valdemar Poulsen
Valdemar Poulsen
Valdemar Poulsen
(23 November 1869 – 23 July 1942) was a Danish engineer who made significant contributions to early radio technology. He developed a magnetic wire recorder called the telegraphone in 1899 and the first continuous wave radio transmitter, the Poulsen arc transmitter, in 1903, which was used in some of the first broadcasting stations until the early 1920s.Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was born on 23 November 1869 in Copenhagen. The magnetic recording was demonstrated in principle as early as 1898 by Valdemar Poulsen
Valdemar Poulsen
in his telegraphone. Magnetic wire recording, and its successor, magnetic tape recording, involve the use of a magnetizable medium which moves past a recording head
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Bass Drum
A bass drum, or kick drum, is a large drum that produces a note of low definite or indefinite pitch. Bass drums are percussion instruments and vary in size and are used in several musical genres. Three major types of bass drums can be distinguished.The type usually seen or heard in orchestral, ensemble or concert band music is the orchestral, or concert bass drum (in Italian: gran cassa, gran tamburo). It is the largest drum of the orchestra. The kick drum, a term for a bass drum associated with a drum kit
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Oxy-fuel Welding And Cutting
Oxy-fuel welding (commonly called oxyacetylene welding, oxy welding, or gas welding in the U.S.) and oxy-fuel cutting are processes that use fuel gases and oxygen to weld and cut metals, respectively. French engineers Edmond Fouché and Charles Picard became the first to develop oxygen-acetylene welding in 1903.[1] Pure oxygen, instead of air, is used to increase the flame temperature to allow localized melting of the workpiece material (e.g. steel) in a room environment. A common propane/air flame burns at about 2,250 K (1,980 °C; 3,590 °F),[2] a propane/oxygen flame burns at about 2,526 K (2,253 °C; 4,087 °F),[3] an oxyhydrogen flame burns at 3,073 K (2,800 °C; 5,072 °F), and an acetylene/oxygen flame burns at about 3,773 K (3,500 °C; 6,332 °F).[4] Oxy-fuel is one of the oldest welding processes, besides forge welding
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Fidelity
Fidelity
Fidelity
is the quality of faithfulness or loyalty. Its original meaning regarded duty in a broader sense than the related concept of fealty. Both derive from the Latin
Latin
word fidēlis, meaning "faithful or loyal". In the City of London
City of London
financial markets it has traditionally been used in the sense encompassed in the motto "My word is my bond".Contents1 Audio and electronics 2 Scientific modelling
Scientific modelling
and simulation 3 Program evaluation 4 ReferencesAudio and electronics[edit] "Low fidelity" redirects here. For the aesthetic, see Lo-fi music. See also: Sound recording and reproduction In audio, "fidelity" denotes how accurately a copy reproduces its source
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Soldering
Soldering
Soldering
(AmE: /ˈsɒdərɪŋ/, BrE: /ˈsɒldərɪŋ/), is a process in which two or more items (usually metal) are joined together by melting and putting a filler metal (solder) into the joint, the filler metal having a lower melting point than the adjoining metal. Soldering differs from welding in that soldering does not involve melting the work pieces. In brazing, the filler metal melts at a higher temperature, but the work piece metal does not melt
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Fritz Pfleumer
Fritz Pfleumer
Fritz Pfleumer
(20 March 1881 in Salzburg
Salzburg
– 29 August 1945 in Radebeul) was a German-Austrian engineer who invented magnetic tape for recording sound.[1] Biography[edit] Fritz was born as the son of Robert and Minna, née Hünich. His father Robert (1848–1934) was born in Greiz, and his mother Minna (1846–1932) was born in Freiberg. Fritz had five siblings – Mimi, Hans, Hermann, Otto, and Mizi. Hans emigrated to the USA.[2]Fritz Pfleumer, with his magnetic tape machine (1931)[1]Pfleumer developed a process for putting metal stripes on cigarette papers and reasoned that he could similarly coat a magnetic stripe to be used as an alternative to wire recording.[1] In 1927, after experimenting with various materials, Pfleumer used very thin paper that he coated with iron oxide powder using lacquer as glue
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Iron
Iron
Iron
is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. It is a metal in the first transition series. It is by mass the most common element on Earth, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust. Its abundance in rocky planets like Earth
Earth
is due to its abundant production by fusion in high-mass stars, where it is the last element to be produced with release of energy before the violent collapse of a supernova, which scatters the iron into space. Like the other group 8 elements, ruthenium and osmium, iron exists in a wide range of oxidation states, −2 to +7, although +2 and +3 are the most common. Elemental iron occurs in meteoroids and other low oxygen environments, but is reactive to oxygen and water. Fresh iron surfaces appear lustrous silvery-gray, but oxidize in normal air to give hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust
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Electrical Polarity
Electrical polarity is a term used throughout industries and fields that involve electricity. There are two types of poles: positive (+) and negative (-). This represents the electrical potential at the ends of a circuit. A battery has a positive terminal (pole) and a negative terminal (pole).Contents1 Current Direction 2 Conventions for identification 3 AC systems 4 See alsoCurrent Direction[edit] Conventional Current flows from the positive pole (terminal) to the negative pole. Electrons flow from negative to positive. In a direct current (DC) circuit, current flows in one direction only, and one pole is always negative and the other pole is always positive
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Magnetic Flux
In physics, specifically electromagnetism, the magnetic flux (often denoted Φ or ΦB) through a surface is the surface integral of the normal component of the magnetic field B passing through that surface. The SI unit of magnetic flux is the weber (Wb) (in derived units: volt-seconds), and the CGS unit is the maxwell
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