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Analects
The Analects
Analects
(Chinese: 論語; Old Chinese: *run ŋ(r)aʔ; pinyin: lúnyǔ; literally: "Edited Conversations"),[2] also known as the Analects
Analects
of Confucius, is a collection of sayings and ideas attributed to the Chinese philosopher Confucius
Confucius
and his contemporaries, traditionally believed to have been compiled and written by Confucius's followers. It is believed to have been written during the Warring States period
Warring States period
(475–221 BC), and it achieved its final form during the mid- Han dynasty
Han dynasty
(206 BC–220 AD)
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1976 Tangshan Earthquake
The Tangshan
Tangshan
earthquake, also known as the Great Tangshan earthquake,[2] was a natural disaster that occurred on July 28, 1976. It is believed to be the largest earthquake of the 20th century by death toll.[3] The epicenter of the earthquake was near Tangshan
Tangshan
in Hebei, People's Republic of China, an industrial city with approximately one million inhabitants
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Östasiatiska Museet
The Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (Östasiatiska Museet), Stockholm, Sweden. It is a public museum launched by Sweden's Parliament in 1926, with the Swedish archaeologist Johan Gunnar Andersson (1874–1960) as founding director. The museum was originally based mainly on Andersson's groundbreaking discoveries in China, during the 1920s, of a hitherto unknown East Asian prehistory. The museum today has wide-ranging collections and exhibits of Asian archeology, classical arts, and culture, and a large Asia research library open to the public. The last time the museum published a comprehensive catalog was 1963 (Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities: Album)
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Pyongyang
Pyongyang
Pyongyang
or P'yŏngyang (UK: /ˌpjɒŋˈjæŋ/, US: /ˌpjʌŋˈjɑːŋ/;[6] Korean pronunciation: [pʰjʌŋ.jaŋ]) is the capital and largest city of North Korea. Pyongyang
Pyongyang
is located on the Taedong River
Taedong River
about 109 kilometres (68 mi) upstream from its mouth on the Yellow Sea. According to the 2008 population census, it has a population of 3,255,288.[7] The city was split from the South Pyongan province in 1946
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Emperor Cheng Of Han
Emperor Cheng of Han
Emperor Cheng of Han
(51 BC – 17 April 7 BC) was an emperor of the Chinese Han Dynasty
Han Dynasty
ruling from 33 until 7 BC. He succeeded his father Emperor Yuan of Han. Under Emperor Cheng, the Han dynasty
Han dynasty
continued its slide into disintegration while the emperor's maternal relatives of the Wang clan continued their slow grip on power and on governmental affairs as promoted by the previous emperor. Corruptions and greedy officials continued to plague the government and as a result rebellions broke out throughout the country
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Song Dynasty
The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(/sɔːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279. It was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia
Western Xia
dynasties in the north and was conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
is divided into two distinct periods, Northern and Southern
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Luoyang
Luoyang, formerly romanized as Loyang, is a city located in the confluence area of Luo River and Yellow River
Yellow River
in Central China. It is a prefecture-level city in western Henan
Henan
province. It borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
to the east, Pingdingshan
Pingdingshan
to the southeast, Nanyang to the south, Sanmenxia
Sanmenxia
to the west, Jiyuan
Jiyuan
to the north, and Jiaozuo
Jiaozuo
to the northeast
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Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese, also known as Literary Chinese,[a] is the language of the classic literature from the end of the Spring and Autumn period through to the end of the Han Dynasty, a written form of Old Chinese. Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
is a traditional style of written Chinese that evolved from the classical language, making it different from any modern spoken form of Chinese. Literary Chinese was used for almost all formal writing in China
China
until the early 20th century, and also, during various periods, in Japan, Korea
Korea
and Vietnam
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De (Chinese)
DE, de, or dE may refer to:Contents1 Human names 2 Places 3 Linguistics 4 Military 5 Science, technology, and mathematics 6 Other uses 7 See alsoHuman names[edit]De (surname), a Bengali family name de, a nobiliary particlePlaces[edit]Dé, Mali, a commune and town in Mali De River, Mizoram, India Germany
Germany
(ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country code).de, the ccTLD for Germany Delaware
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Ban Gu
Ban Gu
Ban Gu
(AD 32–92) was a Chinese historian, politician, and poet best known for his part in compiling the Book of Han, the second of China's 24 dynastic histories. He also wrote a number of fu, a major literary form, part prose and part poetry, which is particularly associated with the Han era
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Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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Book Of Han
The Book of Han
Book of Han
or History of the Former Han is a history of China finished in 111, covering the Western, or Former Han dynasty
Han dynasty
from the first emperor in 206 BCE to the fall of Wang Mang
Wang Mang
in 23 CE. It is also called the Book of Former Han. The work was composed by Ban Gu, a court official, with the help of his sister Ban Zhao, continuing the work of their father, Ban Biao. They modeled their work on the Records of the Grand Historian, a universal history, but theirs was the first in this annals-biography form to cover a single dynasty. It is the best source, sometimes the only one, for many topics in this period
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Philologist
Philology
Philology
is the study of language in oral and written historical sources; it is a combination of literary criticism, history, and linguistics.[1] Philology
Philology
is more commonly defined as the study of literary texts as well as oral and written records, the establishment of their authenticity and their original form, and the determination of their meaning. A person who pursues this kind of study is known as a philologist. In older usage, especially British, philology is more general, covering comparative and historical linguistics.[2][3] Classical philology
Classical philology
studies classical languages. Classical philology principally originated from the Library of Pergamum
Library of Pergamum
and the Library of Alexandria[4] around the fourth century BCE, continued by Greeks and Romans throughout the Roman/Byzantine Empire
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Wang Chong
Wang Chong
Wang Chong
(Chinese: 王充; pinyin: Wáng Chōng; Wade–Giles: Wang Ch'ung, 27–c. 100 AD),[1] courtesy name Zhongren (仲任), was a Chinese meteorologist, astronomer, and philosopher active during the Han Dynasty. He developed a rational, secular, naturalistic and mechanistic account of the world and of human beings and gave a materialistic explanation of the origin of the universe.[2] His main work was the Lunheng (論衡, "Critical Essays"). This book contained many theories involving early sciences of astronomy and meteorology, and Wang Chong
Wang Chong
was even the first in Chinese history to mention the use of the square-pallet chain pump, which became common in irrigation and public works in China thereafter.[3] Wang also accurately described the process of the water cycle. Unlike most of the Chinese philosophers of his period, Wang spent much of his life in non-self-inflicted poverty
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Liu Xiang (scholar)
Liu
Liu
Xiang (77–6 BCE[1]), born Liu
Liu
Gengsheng and bearing the courtesy name Zizheng, was a Chinese politician, historian, and writer of the Western Han Dynasty. Among his polymathic scholarly specialties were history, literary bibliography, and astronomy. He is particularly well known for his bibliographic work in cataloging and editing the extensive imperial library.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Liu
Liu
Gengsheng was born in Xuzhou. Being a distant relative of Liu Bang, the founder of the Han dynasty, he was thus a member of the ruling dynastic clan (the Liu
Liu
family)
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Lu (state)
Lu (Chinese: 魯, c. 1042–249 BC) was a vassal state during the Zhou dynasty of ancient China. Founded in the 11th century BC, its rulers were from a cadet branch of the House of Ji (姬) that ruled the Zhou dynasty. The first duke was Boqin, a son of the Duke of Zhou, who was brother of King Wu of Zhou
King Wu of Zhou
and regent to King Cheng of Zhou.[1] Lu was the home state of Confucius
Confucius
as well as Mozi, and as such has an outsized cultural influence among the states of the Eastern Zhou and in history. The Annals of Spring and Autumn, for instance, was written with the Lu rulers' years as their basis
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