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An Experiment With Time
An Experiment with Time
Time
is a book by the British soldier, aeronautical engineer and philosopher J. W. Dunne
J. W. Dunne
(1875–1949) on the subjects of precognitive dreams and a theory of time which he later called Serialism. First published in March 1927, it was widely read and his ideas were explored by many other authors, especially by J. B. Priestley. He published three sequels; The Serial Universe, The New Immortality, and Nothing Dies.Contents1 Contents 2 Description2.1 Overview 2.2 Dreams and the experiment 2.3 The theory of Serialism3 Reception3.1 Academic reception 3.2 Popular reception4 Sequels 5 Literary influence 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksContents[edit]Contents to the Sixth Edition are given:I. Definitions II. The Puzzle III. The Experiment IV. Temporal Endurance and Temporal Flow V. Serial Time VI. Replies to CriticsAppendix to the third edition:I
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Serialism
In music, serialism is a method or technique of composition that uses a series of values to manipulate different musical elements. Serialism began primarily with Arnold Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique, though some of his contemporaries were also working to establish serialism as a form of post-tonal thinking. Twelve-tone technique
Twelve-tone technique
orders the twelve notes of the chromatic scale, forming a row or series and providing a unifying basis for a composition's melody, harmony, structural progressions, and variations. Other types of serialism also work with sets, collections of objects, but not necessarily with fixed-order series, and extend the technique to other musical dimensions (often called "parameters"), such as duration, dynamics, and timbre
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Dangerous Corner
Dangerous may refer to:Contents1 Music1.1 Artists 1.2 Albums 1.3 Songs 1.4 Concerts2 Other uses 3 People with the surname 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Artists[edit]Dangerous!, a South Australian punk bandAlbums[edit] Dangerous (The Bar Kays album)
Dangerous (The Bar Kays album)
(1984)
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An Inspector Calls
An Inspector Calls
An Inspector Calls
is a play written by English dramatist J. B. Priestley, first performed in 1945 in the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and in 1946 in the UK. It is one of Priestley's best known works for the stage, and is considered to be one of the classics of mid-20th century English theatre
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The Notion Club Papers
The Notion Club Papers is the title of an abandoned novel by J. R. R. Tolkien, written during 1945 and published posthumously in Sauron Defeated, the 9th volume of The History of Middle-earth. It is a space/time/dream travel story, written at the same time as The Lord of the Rings was being developed. The story itself revolves around the meetings of an Oxford
Oxford
arts discussion group called the Notion Club, a fictionalization of (and a play on words on the name of) Tolkien's own such club, the Inklings. During these meetings, Alwin Arundel Lowdham discusses his lucid dreams about Númenor; through these dreams, he "discovers" much about the Númenor
Númenor
story and the languages of Middle-earth (notably Quenya, Sindarin, and Adûnaic — the last being the sole source of most of the material on Adûnaic)
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J. R. R. Tolkien
First World WarBattle of the SommeJohn Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE FRSL (/ˈtɒlkiːn/;[a] 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor who is best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. He served as the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford, from 1945 to 1959.[1] He was at one time a close friend of C. S. Lewis—they were both members of the informal literary discussion group known as the Inklings
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The Dark Tower (Lewis Novel)
The Dark Tower is an incomplete manuscript allegedly written by C. S. Lewis that appears to be an unfinished sequel to the science fiction novel Out of the Silent Planet. Perelandra
Perelandra
instead became the second book of Lewis' Space Trilogy, concluded by That Hideous Strength. Walter Hooper, Lewis' literary executor, titled the fragment and published it in the 1977 collection The Dark Tower and Other Stories. Lewis scholar Kathryn Lindskoog challenged the authenticity of the work. For convenience the author of the text is referred to in this article as "Lewis" without qualification.Contents1 Plot summaries 2 Origin 3 Authenticity and relation to the published novels 4 Suggested developments 5 References 6 Further readingPlot summaries[edit] The story deals with an early rendition of interdimensional travel. A fictional Lewis himself narrates, as he does in Perelandra, but Elwin Ransom appears as a supporting character
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C. S. Lewis
Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963) was a British novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, broadcaster, lecturer, and Christian apologist. He held academic positions at both Oxford
Oxford
University (Magdalen College, 1925–1954) and Cambridge University
Cambridge University
(Magdalene College, 1954–1963). He is best known for his works of fiction, especially The Screwtape Letters, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Space Trilogy, and for his non-fiction Christian apologetics, such as Mere Christianity, Miracles, and The Problem of Pain. Lewis and fellow novelist J. R. R. Tolkien
J. R. R. Tolkien
were close friends
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Inklings
The Inklings
Inklings
were an informal literary discussion group associated with the University of Oxford, England, for nearly two decades between the early 1930s and late 1949.[1] The Inklings
Inklings
were literary enthusiasts who praised the value of narrative in fiction and encouraged the writing of fantasy.Contents1 Members 2 Meetings 3 Legacy 4 The Inklings
Inklings
in fiction 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksMembers[edit] The Eagle and Child
The Eagle and Child
pub (commonly known as the Bird and Baby or simply just the Bird) in Oxford
Oxford
where the Inklings
Inklings
met informally on Tuesday mornings during term.The more regular members of the Inklings, many of them academics at the University, included:Owen Barfield J. A. W. Bennett Lord David Cecil Nevill Coghill Hugo Dyson Adam Fox Roger Lancelyn Green Robert Havard C. S
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Middle Earth
Middle-earth
Middle-earth
is the fictional setting of much of British writer J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium
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John Buchan
John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir, GCMG, GCVO, CH, PC (/ˈbʌxən/; 26 August 1875 – 11 February 1940) was a Scottish novelist, historian, and Unionist politician who served as Governor General of Canada, the 15th since Canadian Confederation. After a brief legal career, Buchan simultaneously began his writing career and his political and diplomatic careers, serving as a private secretary to the colonial administrator of various colonies in southern Africa. He eventually wrote propaganda for the British war effort in the First World War. He was elected Member of Parliament for the Combined Scottish Universities in 1927, but he spent most of his time on his writing career, notably writing The Thirty-Nine Steps
The Thirty-Nine Steps
and other adventure fiction
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Theory Of Relativity
The theory of relativity usually encompasses two interrelated theories by Albert Einstein: special relativity and general relativity.[1] Special relativity
Special relativity
applies to elementary particles and their interactions, describing all their physical phenomena except gravity. General relativity
General relativity
explains the law of gravitation and its relation to other forces of nature.[2] It applies to the cosmological and astrophysical realm, including astronomy.[3] The theory transformed theoretical physics and astronomy during the 20th century, superseding a 200-year-old theory of mechanics created primarily by Isaac Newton.[3][4][5] It introduced concepts including spacetime as a unified entity of space and time, relativity of simultaneity, kinematic and gravitational time dilation, and length contraction
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The Gap In The Curtain
The Gap in the Curtain is a 1932 borderline science fiction novel by the Scottish author John Buchan. Part of the action is autobiographical, featuring the agonies of a contemporary up-and-coming politician.[2]Contents1 Plot 2 Critical reception 3 References 4 External linksPlot[edit] Buchan's novel opens with the narrator, Sir Edward Leithen, being introduced at a house party to the brilliant physicist and mathematician professor Moe. Moe has been working on a new theory of time, and believes he has found a way of enabling people to see, as if through a 'gap in the curtain', details of a future event. He enlists several of the house party guests into an experiment. For several days, each has to apply his whole concentration to anticipate what will be printed on a chosen page of The Times newspaper exactly one year hence
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James Hilton (novelist)
James Hilton (9 September 1900 – 20 December 1954) was an English novelist best remembered for several best-sellers, including Lost Horizon
Lost Horizon
and Goodbye, Mr. Chips. He also wrote Hollywood screenplays.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Novels2.1 Lost Horizon 2.2 Goodbye, Mr. Chips3 Oscar winner 4 Works4.1 Novels 4.2 Non-fiction 4.3 Short stories 4.4 Plays 4.5 Screenplays5 Adaptations and sequels of his works 6 Memorials 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Leigh, Lancashire, England, Hilton was the son of John Hilton, the headmaster of Chapel End School in Walthamstow
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Random Harvest
Random Harvest
Random Harvest
is a novel written by James Hilton, first published in 1941. Like previous Hilton works, including Lost Horizon
Lost Horizon
and Goodbye, Mr. Chips, the novel was immensely popular, placing second on The New York Times list of best-selling novels for the year. The novel was successfully adapted into a film of the same name in 1942 under the direction of Mervyn LeRoy. Claudine West, George Froeschel and Arthur Wimperis
Arthur Wimperis
adapted the novel for the screen, and received an Academy Award nomination for their work
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