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Amygdala Hijack
Amygdala
Amygdala
hijack is a term coined by Daniel Goleman
Daniel Goleman
in his 1996 book Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ.[1] Drawing on the work of Joseph E. LeDoux, Goleman uses the term to describe emotional responses from people which are immediate and overwhelming, and out of measure with the actual stimulus because it has triggered a much more significant emotional threat.[2]Contents1 Definition 2 Positive hijacks 3 Emotional relearning 4 See also 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Part of the thalamus's stimuli goes directly to the amygdala, while other parts are sent to the neocortex or "thinking brain"
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Daniel Goleman
Daniel Goleman
Daniel Goleman
(born March 7, 1946) is an author and science journalist. For twelve years, he wrote for The New York Times, reporting on the brain and behavioral sciences. His 1995 book Emotional Intelligence was on The New York Times
The New York Times
Best Seller list for a year-and-a-half, a best-seller in many countries, and is in print worldwide in 40 languages
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Joseph E. LeDoux
Joseph E. LeDoux (born December 7, 1949) is an American neuroscientist whose research is primarily focused on the biological underpinnings of emotion and memory, especially brain mechanisms related to fear and anxiety. LeDoux is the Henry and Lucy Moses Professor of Science at New York University, and director of the Emotional Brain Institute, a collaboration between NYU and New York State with research sites at NYU and the Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research in Orangeburg, New York
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Thalamus
The thalamus (from Greek θάλαμος, "chamber")[1] is the large mass of gray matter in the dorsal part of the diencephalon of the brain with several functions such as relaying of sensory signals, including motor signals, to the cerebral cortex,[2][3][page needed] and the regulation of consciousness, sleep, and alertness.[4] It is a midline symmetrical structure of two halves, within the vertebrate brain, situated between the cerebral cortex and the midbrain. It is the main product of the embryonic diencephalon, as first assigned by Wilhelm His, Sr.
Wilhelm His, Sr.
in 1893.[5]Contents1 Anatomy1.1 Blood suppl
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Neocortex
The neocortex, also called the neopallium and isocortex, is the part of the mammalian brain involved in higher-order brain functions such as sensory perception, cognition, generation of motor commands,[1] spatial reasoning and language.[2] The neocortex is further subdivided into the true isocortex and the proisocortex.[3] In the human brain, the neocortex is the largest part of the cerebral cortex which is the outer layer of the cerebrum, with the allocortex making up the rest. The neocortex is made up of six layers, labelled from the outermost inwards, I to VI
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Stimulus (physiology)
In physiology, a stimulus (plural stimuli) is a detectable change in the internal or external environment. The ability of an organism or organ to respond to external stimuli is called sensitivity. When a stimulus is applied to a sensory receptor, it normally elicits or influences a reflex via stimulus transduction. These sensory receptors can receive information from outside the body, as in touch receptors found in the skin or light receptors in the eye, as well as from inside the body, as in chemoreceptors and mechanoreceptors. An internal stimulus is often the first component of a homeostatic control system. External stimuli are capable of producing systemic responses throughout the body, as in the fight-or-flight response
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Hippocampus
The hippocampus (named after its resemblance to the seahorse, from the Greek ἱππόκαμπος, "seahorse" from ἵππος hippos, "horse" and κάμπος kampos, "sea monster") is a major component of the brains of humans and other vertebrates. Humans and other mammals have two hippocampi, one in each side of the brain. The hippocampus belongs to the limbic system and plays important roles in the consolidation of information from short-term memory to long-term memory, and in spatial memory that enables navigation. The hippocampus is located under the cerebral cortex (allocortical)[1][2][3] and in primates in the medial temporal lobe
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Fight-or-flight Response
The fight-or-flight response (also called hyperarousal, or the acute stress response) is a physiological reaction that occurs in response to a perceived harmful event, attack, or threat to survival.[1] It was first described by Walter Bradford Cannon.[a][2] His theory states that animals react to threats with a general discharge of the sympathetic nervous system, preparing the animal for fighting or fleeing.[3] More specifically, the adrenal medulla produces a hormonal cascade that results in the secretion of catecholamines, especially norepinephrine and epinephrine.[4] The hormones estrogen, testosterone, and cortisol, as well as the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin, also affect how organisms react to stress.[5] This response is recognised as the first stage of the general adaptation syndrome that regulates stress responses among vertebrates and other organisms.[6]Contents1 Physiology1.1 Autonomic nervous system1.1.1 Sympathetic nervous system 1.1.2
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Limbic
The limbic system is a set of brain structures located on both sides of the thalamus, immediately beneath the cerebrum.[1] It has also been referred to as the paleomammalian cortex
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Emotional Intelligence
Emotional intelligence (EI), also known as Emotional quotient (EQ) and Emotional Intelligence
Intelligence
Quotient (EIQ)[1], is the capability of individuals to recognize their own emotions and those of others, discern between different feelings and label them appropriately, use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior, and manage and/or adjust emotions to adapt to environments or achieve one's goal(s).[2] Although the term first appeared in a 1964 paper by Michael Beldoch, it gained popularity in the 1995 book by that title, written by the author, and science journalist Daniel Goleman.[3] Since this time, Goleman's 1995 analysis of EI has been criticized within the scientific community,[4] despite prolific reports of its usefulness in the popular press.[5][6][7][8] There are currently several models of EI
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Stress (biology)
Physiological
Physiological
or biological stress is an organism's response to a stressor such as an environmental condition. Stress is the body's method of reacting to a condition such as a challenge or physical and psychological barrier. Stimuli that alter an organism's environment are responded to by multiple systems in the body. The autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are two major systems that respond to stress. The sympathoadrenal medullary (SAM) axis may activate the fight-or-flight response through the sympathetic nervous system, which dedicates energy to more relevant bodily systems to acute adaptation to stress, while the parasympathetic nervous system returns the body to homeostasis. The second major physiological stress, the HPA axis
HPA axis
regulates the release of cortisol, which influences many bodily functions such as metabolic, psychological and immunological functions
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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Amygdala
The amygdala (/əˈmɪɡdələ/; plural: amygdalae; also corpus amygdaloideum; Latin
Latin
from Greek, ἀμυγδαλή, amygdalē, 'almond', 'tonsil'[1]) is one of two almond-shaped groups of nuclei located deep and medially within the temporal lobes of the brain in complex vertebrates, including humans.[2] Shown in research to perform a primary role in the processing of memory, decision-making and emotional responses, the amygdalae are considered part of the limbic system.[3]Contents1 Structure1.1 Hemispheric specializations2 Development2.1 Sex distinction3 Function3.1 Connections 3.2 Em
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Amygdala Hijack
Amygdala
Amygdala
hijack is a term coined by Daniel Goleman
Daniel Goleman
in his 1996 book Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ.[1] Drawing on the work of Joseph E. LeDoux, Goleman uses the term to describe emotional responses from people which are immediate and overwhelming, and out of measure with the actual stimulus because it has triggered a much more significant emotional threat.[2]Contents1 Definition 2 Positive hijacks 3 Emotional relearning 4 See also 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Part of the thalamus's stimuli goes directly to the amygdala, while other parts are sent to the neocortex or "thinking brain"
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