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Amusement Park
An amusement park is a park that features various attractions, such as rides and games, as well as other events for entertainment purposes. A theme park is a type of amusement park that bases its structures and attractions around a central theme, often featuring multiple areas with different themes. Unlike temporary and mobile funfairs and carnivals, amusement parks are stationary and built for long-lasting operation
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Juggling
Juggling
Juggling
is a physical skill, performed by a juggler, involving the manipulation of objects for recreation, entertainment, art or sport. The most recognizable form of juggling is toss juggling. Juggling
Juggling
can be the manipulation of one object or many objects at the same time, using one or many hands. Jugglers often refer to the objects they juggle as props. The most common props are balls, clubs, or rings. Some jugglers use more dramatic objects such as knives, fire torches or chainsaws
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Cremorne Gardens, London
Cremorne Gardens were popular pleasure gardens by the side of the River Thames
River Thames
in Chelsea, London. They lay between Chelsea Harbour and the end of the King's Road
King's Road
and flourished between 1845 and 1877; today only a vestige survives, on the river at the southern end of Cheyne Walk. Cremorne is also a ward of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. The population of the ward at the 2011 Census was 7,974.[1]Contents1 History 2 Today 3 In popular culture 4 References and sourcesHistory[edit] Originally the property of the Earl of Huntingdon (c. 1750), father of Steele's Aspasia, who built a mansion here, the property passed through various hands into those of The 1st Viscount Cremorne (1725–1813), an Irish peer from County Monaghan, who greatly beautified it. The name Cremorne is the name of a barony, an old administrative unit, in County Monaghan
County Monaghan
in Ireland
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King's Lynn
King's Lynn
King's Lynn
/ˌkɪŋz ˈlɪn/, known until 1537 as Bishop's Lynn,[2] is a seaport and market town in Norfolk, England, about 98 miles (158 km) north of London, 36 miles (58 km) north-east of Peterborough, 44 miles (71 km) north north-east of Cambridge
Cambridge
and 44 miles (71 km) west of Norwich.[2] The population of the town is 42,800.[1] The town has two theatres (St George's Guildhall and Corn Exchange), three museums (Stories of Lynn, Lynn Museum and True's Yard) and several other cultural and sporting venues. There are three secondary schools and one college
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Aylsham
Aylsham
Aylsham
is a historic market town and civil parish on the River Bure in north Norfolk, England, nearly 9 mi (14 km) north of Norwich. The river rises near Melton Constable, 11 miles (18 km) upstream from Aylsham
Aylsham
and continues to Great Yarmouth
Great Yarmouth
and the North Sea, although it was only made navigable after 1779, allowing grain, coal and timber to be brought up river. The town is close to large estates and grand country houses at Blickling, Felbrigg, Mannington and Wolterton, which are important tourist attractions. The civil parish has an area of 4,329 acres (17.52 square km) and in the 2001 census had a population of 5,504 in 2448 households, reducing to a population of 3,999 in 1,591 households at the 2011 Census
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Vauxhall Gardens
Vauxhall Gardens
Vauxhall Gardens
/ˈvɒksɔːl/ was a pleasure garden in Kennington
Kennington
on the south bank of the River Thames
River Thames
and accessed by boat from London until the erection of Vauxhall Bridge in the 1810s. The wider area was absorbed into the metropolis as the city expanded in the early to mid-19th century. It was one of the leading venues for public entertainment in London, from the mid-17th century to the mid-19th century. Originally known as 'New Spring Gardens', the site is believed to have opened before the Restoration of 1660, the first known mention being made by Samuel Pepys in 1662. The Gardens consisted of several acres of trees and shrubs with attractive walks. Initially entrance was free, with food and drink being sold to support the venture. The site became Vauxhall Gardens
Vauxhall Gardens
in 1785 and admission was charged for its many attractions
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Carousel
A carousel (American English: from French carrousel and Italian carosello), roundabout (British English),[1] or merry-go-round, is an amusement ride consisting of a rotating circular platform with seats for riders. The "seats" are traditionally in the form of rows of wooden horses or other animals mounted on posts, many of which are moved up and down by gears to simulate galloping, to the accompaniment of looped circus music.[citation needed] This leads to one of the alternative American names, the galloper. Other popular names are jumper, horseabout and flying horses.[citation needed] Carousels are commonly populated with horses, each horse weighing roughly 100 lbs (45 kg), but may include a variety of mounts,[2] for example pigs, zebras, tigers or mythological creatures such as dragons or unicorns
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Menagerie
A menagerie is a collection of captive animals, frequently exotic, kept for display; or the place where such a collection is kept, a precursor to the modern zoological garden.[1] The term was first used in seventeenth century France
France
in reference to the management of household or domestic stock. Later, it came to be used primarily in reference to aristocratic or royal animal collections
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Theme Park (other)
A theme park is a group of entertainment attractions, rides, and other events in a location for the enjoyment of large numbers of people. Theme Park may also refer to:Theme Park (Alvin Curran album) Theme Park (BMX Bandits album) "Theme Park" (Lung Leg song) Theme Park (video game)See also[edit]Amusement Park (other)This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Theme Park. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Conjuring
Evocation
Evocation
is the act of calling upon or summoning a spirit, demon, god or other supernatural agent, in the Western mystery tradition. Comparable practices exist in many religions and magical traditions and may employ the use of mind-altering substances with and without uttered word formulas.Contents1 In the Western mystery tradition 2 Texts and language 3 Objectives of conjuration 4 Religious views 5 Conjuration in Mid-West Asia 6 Contemporary references 7 In other beliefs 8 See also 9 References 10 Further readingIn the Western mystery tradition[edit]John Dee and Edward Kelley
Edward Kelley
evoking a spiritThe Latin
Latin
word evocatio was the "calling forth" or "summoning away" of a city's tutelary deity
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Acrobatics
Acrobatics
Acrobatics
(from Greek ἀκροβατέω akrobateō, "walk on tiptoe, strut"[1]) is the performance of extraordinary human feats of balance, agility, and motor coordination. It can be found in many of the performing arts, sports (sporting) events, and martial arts. Acrobatics
Acrobatics
is most often associated with activities that make extensive use of gymnastic elements, such as acro dance, circus, and gymnastics, but many other athletic activities — such as ballet and diving — may also employ acrobatics. Although acrobatics is most commonly associated with human body performance, it may also apply to other types of performance, such as aerobatics.Contents1 History 2 Types2.1 Aerial 2.2 Other3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]A female acrobat depicted on an Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
hydria, c
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Freak Show
A freak show is an exhibition of biological rarities, referred to in popular culture as "freaks of nature." Typical features would be physically unusual humans, such as those uncommonly large or small, those with both male and female secondary sexual characteristics, people with other extraordinary diseases and conditions, and performances that are expected to be shocking to the viewers. Heavily tattooed or pierced people have sometimes been seen in freak shows, as have attention-getting physical performers such as fire-eating and sword-swallowing acts.Contents1 History 2 The American Museum 3 Tom Norman 4 Dime Museum 5 Circus 6 Disability 7 Historical timeline 8 Modern freak shows 9 In popular culture 10 See also 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksHistory[edit] In the mid-16th century, freak shows became popular pastimes in England.[1] Deformities began to be treated as objects of interest and entertainment, and the crowds flocked to see them exhibited
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Bartholomew Fair
The Bartholomew Fair
Bartholomew Fair
was one of London's pre-eminent summer Charter fairs. A charter for the fair was granted to Rahere
Rahere
by Henry I to fund the Priory of St Bartholomew; and from 1133 to 1855 it took place each year on 24 August within the precincts of the Priory at West Smithfield, outside Aldersgate
Aldersgate
of the City of London.[1] The fair continued, after the Dissolution within the Liberty of the parish of St Bartholomew-the-Great.Contents1 Description 2 In literature and art 3 References 4 See also 5 External linksDescription[edit]Advertisement for a puppetry booth at Bartholomew Fair, circa 1700The site of Bartholomew Fair
Bartholomew Fair
was the south-east side of Smithfield roundabout and was originally a cloth fair
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Middle Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Firework
Fireworks
Fireworks
are a class of low explosive pyrotechnic devices used for aesthetic and entertainment purposes. The most common use of a firework is as part of a fireworks display (also called a fireworks show or pyrotechnics), a display of the effects produced by firework devices. Fireworks competitions
Fireworks competitions
are also regularly held at a number of places. Fireworks
Fireworks
take many forms to produce the four primary effects: noise, light, smoke, and floating materials (confetti for example). They may be designed to burn with colored flames and sparks including red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, and silver
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Marylebone Gardens
Marylebone
Marylebone
Gardens or Marybone Gardens was a London
London
pleasure garden sited in the grounds of th
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