HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

American Heritage Dictionary
The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (AHD) is an American dictionary of English published by Boston publisher Houghton Mifflin, the first edition of which appeared in 1969. Its creation was spurred by the controversy over the perceived permissiveness of the Webster's Third New International Dictionary. The third edition had more than 350,000 entries and meanings.[1] James Parton (1912–2001), grandson of the English-born American biographer James Parton (1822–1891), and founder, publisher and co-owner of the magazines American Heritage and Horizon, was appalled by the permissiveness of Webster's Third, published in 1961. Parton tried to buy the G. and C. Merriam Company so that he could undo the changes. When that failed, he contracted with Houghton to publish a new dictionary
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Susan Stamberg
Susan Stamberg (born September 7, 1938) is an American radio journalist. Stamberg was co-host of NPR's flagship program All Things Considered. In that role Stamberg was the first female host of a national news broadcast.[1] She's considered one of NPR's "Founding Mothers"[2] along with Nina Totenberg, Linda Wertheimer and the late Cokie Roberts. After nearly 50 years at the network, Stamberg is currently a Special Correspondent and her reports appear weekly on NPR's Morning Edition. Susan Stamberg was born Susan Levitt in Newark, New Jersey.[3] She graduated from Barnard College in 1959. For 14 years, beginning in 1972, Stamberg served as co-host of All Things Considered, the evening news magazine. She was the first woman to hold a full-time position as anchor of a national nightly news broadcast in the United States. She was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Award (CPB)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Garrison Keillor

Gary Edward "Garrison" Keillor (born August 7, 1942) is an American author, storyteller, humorist, voice actor, and radio personality. He is best known as the creator of the Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) show A Prairie Home Companion (called Garrison Keillor's Radio Show in some international syndication), which he hosted from 1974 to 2016. Keillor created the fictional Minnesota town Lake Wobegon, the setting of many of his books, including Lake Wobegon Days and Leaving Home: A Collection of Lake Wobegon Stories. Other creations include Guy Noir, a detective voiced by Keillor who appeared in A Prairie Home Companion comic skits
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

David Sedaris

David Raymond Sedaris (/sɪˈdɛərɪs/; born December 26, 1956)[1] is an American humorist, comedian, author, and radio contributor. He was publicly recognized in 1992 when National Public Radio broadcast his essay "Santaland Diaries." He published his first collection of essays and short stories, Barrel Fever, in 1994
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Etymology
Etymology (/ˌɛtɪˈmɒləi/)[1] is the study of the history of words.[1] By extension, the phrase "the etymology of [a word]" means the origin of a particular word.[2] For languages with a long written history, etymologists make use of texts, and texts about the language, to gather knowledge about how words were used during earlier periods, how they developed in meaning and form, or when and how they entered the language
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Root (linguistics)
A root (or root word) is a part of a word with lexical meaning that cannot be broken down further.[1] The term root originates in Hebrew linguistics and was unknown in Western linguistics until the 16th century, when Hebrew linguistics was discovered by non-Jewish linguists. The root word is the primary lexical unit of a word, and of a word family (this root is then called the base word), which carries the most significant aspects of semantic content and cannot be reduced into smaller constituents. Content words in nearly all languages contain, and may consist only of, root morphemes. In some cases the term "root" is also used to describe the word without its inflectional endings, but instead with its lexical endings in place. For example, "chatters" has the inflectional root or lemma "chatter", but the lexical root chat
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Marsha Norman

Marsha Norman (born September 21, 1947) is an American playwright, screenwriter, and novelist. She received the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for her play 'night, Mother. She wrote the book and lyrics for such Broadway musicals as The Secret Garden, for which she won a Tony Award and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Book of a Musical, and The Red Shoes, as well as the libretto for the musical The Color Purple[1] and the book for the musical The Bridges of Madison County
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Idiom
An idiom is a phrase or expression that typically presents a figurative, non-literal meaning attached to the phrase; but some phrases become figurative idioms while retaining the literal meaning of the phrase. Categorized as formulaic language, an idiom's figurative meaning is different from the literal meaning.[1] Idioms occur frequently in all languages; in English alone there are an estimated twenty-five thousand idiomatic expressions.[2] Many idiomatic expressions were meant literally in their original use, but sometimes, the attribution of the literal meaning changed and the phrase itself grew away from its original roots—typically leading to a folk etymology. For instance, the literal spill the beans (meaning to reveal a secret) apparently originated from an ancient method of voting, wherein a voter deposited a bean into one of several cups, indicating the candidate they favored
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]