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American Society Of Cinematographers
The AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CINEMATOGRAPHERS (ASC), founded in 1919, is an educational, cultural, and professional organization. Neither a labor union nor a guild , ASC membership is by invitation and is extended only to directors of photography and special effects experts with distinguished credits in the film industry. Members can put the letters _A.S.C._ after their names . ASC membership has become one of the highest honors that can be bestowed upon a professional cinematographer, a mark of prestige and distinction. The ASC currently has approximately 340 members and continues to grow. CONTENTS * 1 Origins * 2 Publications * 3 Founding members * 4 Award categories * 4.1 Film * 4.2 Television * 4.3 Lifetime Achievement * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links ORIGINSIts history goes back to the Cinema Camera Club in New York City founded by Arthur Charles Miller , Phil Rosen , and Frank Kugler . Arthur Miller and his brother, William Miller , both filmmakers in New York City , worked together and established a much-needed union for cinematography workers called the Motion Picture Industry Union . Arthur Miller left to work in Hollywood, California , one year after the Motion Picture Industry Union was formed. The ASC was chartered in California in January 1919 by Miller and claims to be the "oldest continuously operating motion picture society in the world"
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Hollywood
HOLLYWOOD (/ˈhɒliwʊd/ _HOL-ee-wuud_ ) is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles , California . This ethnically diverse, densely populated neighborhood is notable as the home of the U.S. film industry , including several of its historic studios, and its name has come to be a shorthand reference for the industry and the people in it. Hollywood was a small community in 1870 and was incorporated as a municipality in 1903. It was consolidated with the city of Los Angeles in 1910, and soon thereafter a prominent film industry emerged, eventually becoming the most recognizable film industry in the world. CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Early history and development * 1.2 Incorporation and merger * 1.3 Motion picture industry * 1.4 Development * 1.5 Revitalization * 1.6 Secession movement * 2 Geography * 3 Adjacent neighborhoods * 4 Demographics * 5 Radio and television * 6 Government * 6.1 Emergency service * 6.2 Post office * 6.3 Neighborhood councils * 7 Education * 7.1 Schools * 7.2 Public libraries * 8 Notable places * 9 Special events * 10 See also * 11 References * 12 External links HISTORYEARLY HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENTIn 1853, one adobe hut stood in Nopalera ( Nopal field), named for the Mexican Nopal cactus indigenous to the area. By 1870, an agricultural community flourished
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California
Native languages as of 2007 * English 57.4% * Spanish 28.5% * Chinese 2.8% * Tagalog 2.2% DEMONYM Californian CAPITAL Sacramento LARGEST CITY Los Angeles LARGEST METRO Greater Los Angeles Area AREA Ranked 3rd • TOTAL 163,696 sq mi (423,970 km2) • WIDTH 250 miles (400 km) • LENGTH 770 miles (1,240 km) • % WATER 4.7 • LATITUDE 32°32′ N to 42° N • LONGITUDE 114°8′ W to 124°26′ W POPULATION Ranked 1st • TOTAL 39,250,017 (2016 est.) • DENSITY 240/sq mi (92.6/km2) Ranked 11th • MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME $63,636 (13th) ELEVATION • HIGHEST POINT Mount Whitney 14,505 ft (4,421.0 m) • MEAN 2,900 ft (880 m) • LOWEST POINT Badwater Basin −279 ft (−85.0 m) BEFORE STATEHOOD California Republic ADMISSION TO UNION September 9, 1850 (31st) GOVERNOR Jerry Brown (D ) LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR Gavin Newsom (D ) LEGISLATURE California State Legislature • UPPER HOUSE California State Senate • LOWER HOUSE California State Assembly U.S. SENATORS Dianne Feinstein (D ) Kamala Harris (D ) U.S
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Cinematographers
A CINEMATOGRAPHER or DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY (sometimes shortened to DP or DOP) is the chief over the camera and light crews working on a film , television production or other live action piece and is responsible for making artistic and technical decisions related to the image. The study and practice of this field is referred to as cinematography . Some filmmakers say that the cinematographer is just the chief over the camera and lighting, and the director of photography is the chief over all the photography components of film, including framing, costumes, makeup, and lighting, as well as the assistant of the post producer for color correction and grading. The cinematographer selects the camera, film stock , lens , filters , etc., to realize the scene in accordance with the intentions of the director . Relations between the cinematographer and director vary; in some instances the director will allow the cinematographer complete independence; in others, the director allows little to none, even going so far as to specify exact camera placement and lens selection. Such a level of involvement is not common once the director and cinematographer have become comfortable with each other; the director will typically convey to the cinematographer what is wanted from a scene visually, and allow the cinematographer latitude in achieving that effect
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Labor Union
A TRADE UNION or TRADES UNION, also called a LABOUR UNION (Canada ) or LABOR UNION (US ), is an organization of workers who have come together to achieve common goals such as protecting the integrity of its trade, improving safety standards, achieving higher pay and benefits such as health care and retirement, increasing the number of employees an employer assigns to complete the work, and better working conditions . The trade union, through its leadership, bargains with the employer on behalf of union members (rank and file members) and negotiates labour contracts (collective bargaining ) with employers. The most common purpose of these associations or unions is "maintaining or improving the conditions of their employment ". This may include the negotiation of wages , work rules, complaint procedures, rules governing hiring, firing and promotion of workers, benefits, workplace safety and policies. Unions may organize a particular section of skilled workers (craft unionism ), a cross-section of workers from various trades (general unionism ), or attempt to organize all workers within a particular industry (industrial unionism ). The agreements negotiated by a union are binding on the rank and file members and the employer and in some cases on other non-member workers
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Guild
A GUILD /ɡɪld/ is an association of artisans or merchants who oversee the practice of their craft in a particular town. The earliest types of guild were formed as confraternities of tradesmen. They were organized in a manner something between a professional association , trade union , a cartel , and a secret society . They often depended on grants of letters patent by a monarch or other authority to enforce the flow of trade to their self-employed members, and to retain ownership of tools and the supply of materials. A lasting legacy of traditional guilds are the guildhalls constructed and used as meeting places. One of the legacies of the guilds, the elevated Windsor Guildhall was originally a meeting place for guilds, as well as magistrates' seat and town hall . An important result of the guild framework was the emergence of universities at Bologna (established in 1088), Oxford (at least since 1096) and Paris (c. 1150); they originated as guilds of students as at Bologna, or of masters as at Paris
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Cinematographer
A CINEMATOGRAPHER or DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY (sometimes shortened to DP or DOP) is the chief over the camera and light crews working on a film , television production or other live action piece and is responsible for making artistic and technical decisions related to the image. The study and practice of this field is referred to as cinematography . Some filmmakers say that the cinematographer is just the chief over the camera and lighting, and the director of photography is the chief over all the photography components of film, including framing, costumes, makeup, and lighting, as well as the assistant of the post producer for color correction and grading. The cinematographer selects the camera, film stock , lens , filters , etc., to realize the scene in accordance with the intentions of the director . Relations between the cinematographer and director vary; in some instances the director will allow the cinematographer complete independence; in others, the director allows little to none, even going so far as to specify exact camera placement and lens selection. Such a level of involvement is not common once the director and cinematographer have become comfortable with each other; the director will typically convey to the cinematographer what is wanted from a scene visually, and allow the cinematographer latitude in achieving that effect
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Special Effects
SPECIAL EFFECTS (often abbreviated as SFX, SPFX, or simply FX) are illusions or visual tricks used in the film , television , theatre , video game , and simulator industries to simulate the imagined events in a story or virtual world . Special
Special
effects are traditionally divided into the categories of OPTICAL EFFECTS and MECHANICAL EFFECTS. With the emergence of digital filmmaking a distinction between special effects and visual effects has grown, with the latter referring to digital post-production while "special effects" referring to mechanical and optical effects. Mechanical effects (also called practical or physical effects ) are usually accomplished during the live-action shooting. This includes the use of mechanized props , scenery, scale models , animatronics , pyrotechnics and atmospheric effects: creating physical wind, rain, fog, snow, clouds, etc. Making a car appear to drive by itself and blowing up a building are examples of mechanical effects. Mechanical effects are often incorporated into set design and makeup. For example, a set may be built with break-away doors or walls to enhance a fight scene, or prosthetic makeup can be used to make an actor look like a non-human creature
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Post-nominal Letters
POST-NOMINAL LETTERS, also called POST-NOMINAL INITIALS, POST-NOMINAL TITLES or DESIGNATORY LETTERS, are letters placed after a person's name to indicate that that individual holds a position, academic degree, accreditation, office, military decoration, or honour, or is a member of a religious institute or fraternity. An individual may use several different sets of post-nominal letters, but in some contexts it may be customary to limit the number of sets to one or just a few. The order in which post-nominals are listed after a name is based on rules of precedence and what is appropriate for a given situation. Post-nominal letters are one of the main types of name suffix . In contrast, pre-nominal letters precede the name rather than following it
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New York City
Bronx , Kings (Brooklyn) , New York
York
(Manhattan) , Queens
Queens
, Richmond (Staten Island) ------------------------- HISTORIC COLONIES New Netherland
New Netherland
Province of New York
Province of New York
SETTLED 1624 CONSOLIDATED 1898 NAMED FOR James, Duke of York
York
GOVERNMENT • TYPE Mayor–Council • BODY New York City Council
New York City Council
• MAYOR Bill de Blasio
Bill de Blasio
(D ) AREA • TOTAL 468.484 sq mi (1,213.37 km2) • LAND 302.643 sq mi (783.84 km2) • WATER 165.841 sq mi (429.53 km2) • METRO 13,318 sq mi (34,490 km2) ELEVATION 33 ft (10 m) POPULATION (2010 ) • TOTAL 8,175,133 • ESTIMATE (2016) 8,537,673 • RANK 1st, U.S
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Arthur Charles Miller
ARTHUR CHARLES MILLER, A.S.C. (July 8, 1895 – July 13, 1970) was an American cinematographer . He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Cinematography seven times, winning for How Green Was My Valley in 1941, again in 1944 for The Song of Bernadette , and a third time in 1947 for Anna and the King of Siam . CONTENTS * 1 Career * 2 Partial filmography * 3 References * 4 External links CAREERHe was born in Roslyn, New York . He began his movie career at the age of 13. According to a 1970 interview with Leonard Maltin , he stated he went to work for a horse dealer. One day, he was returning home from delivering some horses and was sitting on a horse when a man offered him a job in motion pictures because he could ride bareback. Miller recalled, "The first day we went out to a golf course in Brooklyn, and I rode this horse all over, got chased, and all." He found himself working as an assistant to filmmaker Fred J. Balshofer . The two remained lifelong friends (and in 1967 co-wrote the book about the early days of film titled One Reel a Week). Miller eventually joined Pathé Frères and, although only 19 years old, became the cinematographer for the 1914 adventure serial The Perils of Pauline . In 1918, he and his brother Bill founded the Motion Picture Industry Union. He moved to Hollywood
Hollywood
and had a lengthy tenure at Paramount from the late teens throughout the 1920s
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Phil Rosen
PHIL ROSEN (May 8, 1888 – October 22, 1951) was an American film director and cinematographer . He directed 142 films between 1915 and 1949. He was born in Olinka, in Congress Poland, grew up in Machias, Maine, and died in Hollywood, California of a heart attack. He was one of the founders of the American Society of Cinematographers . Rosen was married to model and actress Joyzelle Joyner
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Frank Kugler
FRANK X. KUGLER (March 29, 1879, Germany – July 7, 1952, St. Louis, Missouri ) was a German - American wrestler , weightlifter and tug of war competitor who competed in the 1904 Summer Olympics . In 1904 he won a silver medal in wrestlings' heavyweight category, bronze medals in weightliftings' two hand lift and all-around dumbbell events and another bronze in the tug of war competition as a member of Southwest Turnverein of Saint Louis No. 2 team. He is recognised as an American by the IOC although he was a German national at the time of the Games. Despite taking last place in 9 out of 10 events in the dumbbell competition he was awarded the bronze as there were only 3 competitors. He is the only competitor to win a medal in three different sports at the same Olympic Games. REFERENCES * ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-10-08. Retrieved 2012-10-23. Retrieved 23/10/2012. * "Frank Kugler". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC . Archived from the original on 2012-10-08. This article about an Olympic medalist of the United States is a stub . You can help by expanding it . * v * t * e This biographical article relating to an American sport wrestler or wrestling coach is a stub . You can help by expanding it . * v * t * e This biographical article related to tug of war is a stub . You can help by expanding it
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Hollywood, California
HOLLYWOOD (/ˈhɒliwʊd/ HOL-ee-wuud ) is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles
Los Angeles
, California
California
. This ethnically diverse, densely populated neighborhood is notable as the home of the U.S. film industry , including several of its historic studios, and its name has come to be a shorthand reference for the industry and the people in it. Hollywood
Hollywood
was a small community in 1870 and was incorporated as a municipality in 1903. It was consolidated with the city of Los Angeles in 1910, and soon thereafter a prominent film industry emerged, eventually becoming the most recognizable film industry in the world. CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Early history and development * 1.2 Incorporation and merger * 1.3 Motion picture industry * 1.4 Development * 1.5 Revitalization * 1.6 Secession movement * 2 Geography * 3 Adjacent neighborhoods * 4 Demographics * 5 Radio and television * 6 Government * 6.1 Emergency service * 6.2 Post office * 6.3 Neighborhood councils * 7 Education * 7.1 Schools * 7.2 Public libraries * 8 Notable places * 9 Special
Special
events * 10 See also * 11 References * 12 External links HISTORYEARLY HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENTIn 1853, one adobe hut stood in Nopalera ( Nopal field), named for the Mexican Nopal cactus indigenous to the area
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American Cinematographer
AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER is a magazine published monthly by the American Society of Cinematographers . It focuses on the art and craft of cinematography , covering domestic and foreign feature productions, television productions, short films, music videos and commercials. The emphasis is on interviews with cinematographers, but directors and other filmmakers are often featured as well. Articles include technical how-to pieces, discussions of tools and technologies that affect cinematography, and historical features. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Modern era * 3 Chronology of executive editors * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 Sources * 7 External links HISTORYThe American Society of Cinematographers was founded in 1919. It began publishing American Cinematographer on Nov. 1, 1920, as a twice-monthly four-page newsletter about the ASC and its members. In 1922, the publication went monthly. In 1929, editor Hal Hall started to change the publication; he reformatted it to standard magazine size, increased the page count, and included more articles on amateur filmmaking. For a while during the 1930s, the magazine was devoted to professional cinematography and amateur moviemaking in equal measure. In 1937, the ASC purchased a Spanish bungalow, near Grauman\'s Chinese Theatre , at 1782 North Orange Drive in Hollywood, California, which remains the headquarters of the ASC
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American Cinematographer Manual
The AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER MANUAL is a filmmaking manual published by the American Society of Cinematographers . Covering lighting, lenses, and film emulsions, it is considered “an authoritative technical reference manual for cinematographers.” The manual also defines the cinematography profession. CONTENTS * 1 Publishing history * 2 Awards * 3 References * 4 External links PUBLISHING HISTORYThe first edition was published in 1935 by Jackson J. Rose (fr) as THE AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER HAND BOOK AND REFERENCE GUIDE. That handbook went through nine editions (1935, '38, '39, '42, '46, '47, '50, '53, '56) before it evolved into the modern American Cinematographer Manual. The first edition of the modern manual was published in 1960. The book is now in its tenth edition (2016). * 1960 October, First Edition (blue cover), ed. Joseph V. Mascelli, 484 pages. * 1966 September, Second Edition (maroon cover), ed. Joseph V. Mascelli, 628 pages. * 1969, Third Edition (brown cover), ed. Arthur C. Miller and Walter Strenge , 652 pages. * 1973, Fourth Edition (black cover), ed. Charles G. Clarke and Walter Strenge, 658 pages. * 1980, Fifth Edition (black cover), ed. Charles G. Clarke, 628 pages. * 1986, Sixth Edition (red cover), ed. Fred H. Detmers, 440 pages. * 1993, Seventh Edition (green cover, paperback), ed. Dr. Rod Ryan, 618 pages. * 2001, Eighth Edition (blue cover), ed
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