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Alvis Pelides
The Alvis Pelides
Alvis Pelides
was an unflown British air-cooled radial aero engine first developed in 1936. The Pelides Major was a projected but unbuilt development as were the Alcides, Alcides Major and the Maeonides Major, the Alvis aircraft engine range taking their names from Greek mythology.[1]Contents1 Design and development 2 Variants (projected) 3 Specifications (Pelides)3.1 General characteristics 3.2 Components 3.3 Performance4 See also 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 External linksDesign and development[edit] The Pelides was the first aero engine of Alvis design; the company had previously only built the French Gnome-Rhône Mistral Major
Gnome-Rhône Mistral Major
under license.[2] With the two companies working closely together the 14 cylinder radial layout of this engine retained metric dimensions but substituted metric screw threads with British fasteners such as BSF and Whitworth
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Radial Engine
The radial engine is a reciprocating type internal combustion engine configuration in which the cylinders "radiate" outward from a central crankcase like the spokes of a wheel. It resembles a stylized star when viewed from the front, and is called a "star engine" (German Sternmotor, French moteur en étoile, Japanese hoshigata enjin, Italian Motore Stellare) in some languages
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Poppet Valve
A poppet valve (also called mushroom valve[1]) is a valve typically used to control the timing and quantity of gas or vapour flow into an engine. It consists of a hole, usually round or oval, and a tapered plug, usually a disk shape on the end of a shaft also called a valve stem. The portion of the hole where the plug meets with it is referred to as the 'seat' or 'valve seat'. The shaft guides the plug portion by sliding through a valve guide. In exhaust applications a pressure differential helps to seal the valve and in intake valves a pressure differential helps open it. The poppet valve was most likely invented in 1833 by E.A.G
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Wright R-2600
The Wright R-2600
Wright R-2600
Cyclone 14 (also called Twin Cyclone) was an American radial engine developed by Curtiss-Wright
Curtiss-Wright
and widely used in aircraft in the 1930s and 1940s.Contents1 History 2 Variants 3 Applications 4 Specifications (GR-2600-C14BB)4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 BibliographyHistory[edit] In 1935, Curtiss-Wright
Curtiss-Wright
began work on a more powerful version of their successful R-1820 Cyclone 9. The result was the R-2600 Twin Cyclone, with 14 cylinders arranged in two rows
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Shvetsov ASh-82
The Shvetsov
Shvetsov
ASh-82 (M-82) is a Soviet 14-cylinder, two-row, air-cooled radial aircraft engine developed from the Shvetsov
Shvetsov
M-62. The M-62 was the result of development of the M-25, which was a licensed version of the Wright R-1820 Cyclone.Contents1 Design and development 2 Variants 3 Applications 4 Specifications (ASh-82)4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes7 External linksDesign and development[edit] Arkadiy Shvetsov
Shvetsov
re-engineered the Wright Cyclone design, through the OKB-19 design bureau he headed, for Russian aviation engine manufacturing practices and metric dimensions and fasteners, reducing the stroke, dimensions and weight
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Nakajima Sakae
The Nakajima Sakae
Nakajima Sakae
(栄, Prosperity) was a two-row, 14-cylinder air-cooled radial engine used in a number of combat aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Navy
Imperial Japanese Navy

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Mitsubishi Kinsei
The Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Kinsei (金星, Venus) was a 14-cylinder, air-cooled, twin-row radial aircraft engine developed by Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Heavy Industries in Japan
Japan
in 1934 for the Imperial Japanese Navy. The Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
model designation for this engine was A8 while it was an experimental project, in service it was known as the MK8 "Kinsei" by the Navy. In the middle of the war the engine was adopted by Army so it got designation Ha112[1] Unified designation code was Ha-33.Contents1 Design 2 Variants 3 Applications 4 Specifications (Kinsei-44)4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 BibliographyDesign[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Fiat A.74
The Fiat
Fiat
A.74 was a two-row, fourteen-cylinder, air-cooled radial engine produced in Italy in the 1930s as a powerplant for aircraft. It was used in some of Italy's most important aircraft of World War II.Contents1 Design and development 2 Variants 3 Applications 4 Specifications (A.74)4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 ReferencesDesign and development[edit] The A.74 was important in that it marked a transition for Fiat
Fiat
from liquid-cooled inline engines, to large air-cooled radial engines. Fiat had made a number of smaller radial air engines over the years but the A.74 marked a major increase in power and size. The A.74 family was widely produced and spawned a number of related engines such as the A.76, A.80, and A.82. Each successive generation being larger and more powerful than the previous
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BMW 801
The BMW
BMW
801 was a powerful German 41.8 litres (2,550 cu in) air-cooled 14-cylinder-radial aircraft engine built by BMW
BMW
and used in a number of German Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
aircraft of World War II. Production versions of the twin-row engine generated between 1,560 and 2,000 PS (1,540–1,970 hp, or 1,150–1,470 kW). It was the most produced radial engine of Germany in World War II
World War II
with more than 28,000 built. The 801 was originally intended to replace existing radial types in German transport and utility aircraft. At the time, it was widely agreed among European designers[citation needed] that an inline engine was a requirement for high performance designs due to its smaller frontal area and resulting lower drag
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Power-to-weight Ratio
Power-to-weight ratio (or specific power or power-to-mass ratio) is a calculation commonly applied to engines and mobile power sources to enable the comparison of one unit or design to another. Power-to-weight ratio is a measurement of actual performance of any engine or power source. It is also used as a measurement of performance of a vehicle as a whole, with the engine's power output being divided by the weight (or mass) of the vehicle, to give a metric that is independent of the vehicle's size. Power-to-weight is often quoted by manufacturers at the peak value, but the actual value may vary in use and variations will affect performance. The inverse of power-to-weight, weight-to-power ratio (power loading) is a calculation commonly applied to aircraft, cars, and vehicles in general, to enable the comparison of one vehicle's performance to another
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Compression Ratio
The static compression ratio of an internal combustion engine or external combustion engine is a value that represents the ratio of the volume of its combustion chamber from its largest capacity to its smallest capacity. It is a fundamental specification for many common combustion engines. In a piston engine, it is the ratio between the volume of the cylinder and combustion chamber when the piston is at the bottom of its stroke, and the volume of the combustion chamber when the piston is at the top of its stroke.[1] For example, a cylinder and its combustion chamber with the piston at the bottom of its stroke may contain 1000 cc of air (900 cc in the cylinder plus 100 cc in the combustion chamber)
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Octane
Octane
Octane
is a hydrocarbon and an alkane with the chemical formula C8H18, and the condensed structural formula CH3(CH2)6CH3. Octane
Octane
has many structural isomers that differ by the amount and location of branching in the carbon chain. One of these isomers, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane) is used as one of the standard values in the octane rating scale. Octane
Octane
is a component of gasoline (petrol)
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Zenith Carburetters
The Zenith Carburetter Company Limited was a British company making carburettors in Stanmore Middlesex founded in 1910.[1] In 1965[2] they joined with their major pre-war rival Solex
Solex
Carburettors and over time the Zenith brand name fell into disuse
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Aircraft Engine
An aircraft engine is the component of the propulsion system for an aircraft that generates mechanical power
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