HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Alsop En Le Dale
Alsop en le Dale
Alsop en le Dale
is a village in Derbyshire, England
England
about 5 miles (8.0 km) north of Ashbourne close to the Staffordshire
Staffordshire
border, and a mile from Dovedale, a popular tourist location. Comprising a few cottages and scattered farms, the village was mentioned in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
under Derbyshire
Derbyshire
in the lands belonging to the king.[1] The book which was written in 1086 said:In Parwich are two carucates of land to the geld. There is land for two ploughs. It is waste. Kolli holds it of the king and he has three villans with two bordars with three ploughs. There are twelve acres of meadow. To this manor belong berewicks of Alsop-en-le-Dale, Hanson Grange and Cold Eaton. There are 2 carucates of land to the geld. There is land for two ploughs. It is waste.[2]The Church of St
[...More...]

"Alsop En Le Dale" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Derbyshire
(/ˈdɑːrbɪʃər, -ʃɪər/) is a county in the East Midlands of England. A substantial portion of the Peak District National Park lies within Derbyshire, containing the southern extremity of the Pennine range of hills which extend into the north of the county. The county contains part of the National Forest, and borders on Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
to the northwest, West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
to the north, South Yorkshire
South Yorkshire
to the northeast, Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
to the east, Leicestershire
Leicestershire
to the southeast, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the west and southwest and Cheshire
Cheshire
also to the west
[...More...]

"Derbyshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Buxton
Buxton
Buxton
is a spa town in Derbyshire, in the East Midlands
East Midlands
region of England. It has the highest elevation – about 1,000 feet (300 m) above sea level – of any market town in England.[1][nb 1] Close to the county boundary with Cheshire
Cheshire
to the west and Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the south, Buxton
Buxton
is described as "the gateway to the Peak District
Peak District
National Park".[1] A municipal borough until 1974, Buxton
Buxton
was then merged with other localities lying primarily to the north, including Glossop, to form the local government district and borough of High Peak within the county of Derbyshire. Despite being in the East Midlands, economically Buxton
Buxton
is within the sphere of influence of Greater Manchester
[...More...]

"Buxton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dovedale
Coordinates: 53°03′35″N 1°46′36″W / 53.0597°N 1.7767°W / 53.0597; -1.7767DovedaleValley Thorpe Cloud
Thorpe Cloud
and Stepping Stones, DovedaleCountry EnglandRegions Staffordshire, DerbyshireRiver River DoveGeology limestone Dovedale
Dovedale
is a
[...More...]

"Dovedale" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Domesday Book
Domesday Book
Domesday Book
(/ˈduːmzdeɪ/ or US: /ˈdoʊmzdeɪ/;[1][2] Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:[3]Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester
Gloucester
with his council ... . After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men
[...More...]

"Domesday Book" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

William The Conqueror
William I[a] (c. 1028[1] – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
and sometimes William the Bastard,[2][b] was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke
Duke
of Normandy
Normandy
(as William II) from 1035 onward. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy
Normandy
was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England
Norman conquest of England
six years later. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son. William was the son of the unmarried Robert I, Duke
Duke
of Normandy, by Robert's mistress Herleva
[...More...]

"William The Conqueror" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alsop-en-le-Dale
Alsop en le Dale
Alsop en le Dale
is a village in Derbyshire, England
England
about 5 miles (8.0 km) north of Ashbourne close to the Staffordshire
Staffordshire
border, and a mile from Dovedale, a popular tourist location. Comprising a few cottages and scattered farms, the village was mentioned in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
under Derbyshire
Derbyshire
in the lands belonging to the king.[1] The book which was written in 1086 said:In Parwich are two carucates of land to the geld. There is land for two ploughs. It is waste. Kolli holds it of the king and he has three villans with two bordars with three ploughs. There are twelve acres of meadow. To this manor belong berewicks of Alsop-en-le-Dale, Hanson Grange and Cold Eaton. There are 2 carucates of land to the geld. There is land for two ploughs. It is waste.[2]The Church of St
[...More...]

"Alsop-en-le-Dale" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

St Michael And All Angels’ Church, Alsop-en-le-Dale
St Michael and all Angels’ Church, Alsop en le Dale is a Grade II listed[1] parish church in the Church of England in Alsop en le Dale, Derbyshire.[2] History[edit] The church dates from the 12th century and was rebuilt between 1882 and 1883 by Frederick Josias Robinson.[3] The flat roof was removed and replaced with a pitched roof. The plaster on the walls was removed. The floors were re-laid, that in the chancel with Minton encaustic tiles, and the rest with wooden blocks. A new stone font replaced the old one. The pulpit which had formerly been in St Oswald's Church, Ashbourne was installed. The contractor was J Knowles of Brassington. Parish status[edit] The church is in a joint parish withSt Edmund’s Church, Fenny Bentley St Peter's Church, Parwich St Leonard’s Church, Thorpe St Mary's Church, TissingtonReferences[edit]^ a b Historic England. "Church of St Michael  (Grade II) (1109356)". National Heritage List for England
[...More...]

"St Michael And All Angels’ Church, Alsop-en-le-Dale" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Norman Dynasty
Illegitimate lines:House of Devereux, Viscounts Hereford House of FitzRobert, Earls of Gloucester House of Dunstanville, Earls of Cornwall^ The House of Normandy
Normandy
became extinct before the age of heraldry.The House of Normandy
Normandy
is the usual designation for the family that were the Counts of Rouen, Dukes of Normandy
Dukes of Normandy
and Kings of England which immediately followed the Norman conquest of England
Norman conquest of England
and lasted until the House of Plantagenet
House of Plantagenet
came to power in 1154. It included the Viking Rollo
Rollo
and his descendants, and William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
and his heirs down through 1135
[...More...]

"Norman Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Victorian Restoration
The Victorian restoration
Victorian restoration
was the widespread and extensive refurbishment and rebuilding of Church of England
Church of England
churches and cathedrals that took place in England and Wales during the 19th-century reign of Queen Victoria. It was not the same process as is understood today by the term building restoration. Against a background of poorly maintained church buildings; a reaction against the Puritan
Puritan
ethic manifested in the Gothic Revival; and a shortage of churches where they were needed in cities, the Cambridge Camden Society and the Oxford Movement
Oxford Movement
advocated a return to a more medieval attitude to churchgoing
[...More...]

"Victorian Restoration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Alsop En Le Dale Railway Station
Alsop en le Dale railway station was opened in 1899 near Alsop en le Dale and Alstonefield, villages in Derbyshire southeast of Buxton. It was on the Ashbourne Line built by the LNWR as a branch from the Cromford and High Peak Railway (which ran from Whaley Bridge to Cromford) at Parsley Hay. At some time it was known as "Alsop en le Dale for Alstonefield."Contents1 History 2 The line 3 The site today 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Opened by the London and North Western Railway, it became part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway during the Grouping of 1923. The station then passed on to the London Midland Region of British Railways on nationalisation in 1948
[...More...]

"Alsop En Le Dale Railway Station" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tissington Trail
Parsley Hay
Parsley Hay
(where it joins High Peak Trail) Hartington station Ruby Wood Alsop-en-le-Dale Tissington Thorpe (for Dovedale) Narlows Lane Mapleton Lane (Ashbourne)Coldeaton Cutting on the Tissington
Tissington
TrailThe Tissington
Tissington
Trail just south of Parsley HayThe restored Hartington Signal Box beside the trail. It is now an information centre.The trail at the site of the former Tissington
Tissington
station, now a picnic siteThe Tissington
Tissington
Trail is a bridleway, footpath and cycleway in Derbyshire, England along part of the trackbed of the former railway line connecting Ashbourne to Buxton. It takes its name from the village of Tissington, which it skirts
[...More...]

"Tissington Trail" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Cycle Network
The National Cycle Network
National Cycle Network
(NCN) is the national cycling route network of the United Kingdom, which was established to encourage cycling throughout Britain, as well as for the purposes of bicycle touring. It was created by the charity Sustrans
Sustrans
who were aided by a £42.5 million National Lottery grant. The 14,000 mile network was used for over 230 million trips in 2005. Little of the NCN is on dedicated bike paths
[...More...]

"National Cycle Network" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

River Dove, Derbyshire
The River Dove is the principal river of the southwestern Peak District, in the Midlands of England
England
and is around 45 miles (72 km) in length. It rises on Axe Edge Moor
Axe Edge Moor
near Buxton
Buxton
and flows generally south to its confluence with the River Trent
River Trent
at Newton Solney.[1] From there, its waters reach the North Sea
North Sea
via the Humber Estuary. For almost its entire course it forms the boundary between the counties of Staffordshire
Staffordshire
(to the west) and Derbyshire
Derbyshire
(to the east). The river meanders past Longnor and Hartington and cuts through a set of stunning limestone gorges, Beresford Dale, Wolfscote Dale, Milldale and Dovedale.[2] The river is a famous trout stream
[...More...]

"River Dove, Derbyshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hartington, Derbyshire
Hartington is a village in the Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Peak District, England, lying on the River Dove close to the Staffordshire
Staffordshire
border. According to the 2001 census, the parish of Hartington Town Quarter, which also includes Pilsbury, had a population of 345 reducing to 332 at the 2011 Census.[1] Formerly known for cheese-making and the mining of ironstone, limestone and lead, the village is now popular with tourists.Contents1 Architecture 2 Attractions 3 History 4 Cheese 5 Notable residents 6 References 7 External linksArchitecture[edit] Notable buildings in the village include: the market hall (formerly the site of a market); the 13th-century parish church of Saint Giles; and 17th-century Hartington Hall. The prominent Bank House in the centre of the village was built by the former village mill owner, and in the past was used as the village bank
[...More...]

"Hartington, Derbyshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.