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Aloadae
In Greek mythology, the Aloadae
Aloadae
(/ˌæloʊˈeɪdiː/) or Aloads (Ancient Greek: Ἀλωάδαι Aloadai) were Otus (or Otos) (Ὦτος) and Ephialtes (Ἐφιάλτης), sons of Iphimedia, wife of Aloeus, by Poseidon,[1] whom she induced to make her pregnant by going to the seashore and disporting herself in the surf or scooping seawater into her bosom.[2] From Aloeus they received their patronymic, the Aloadae. They were strong and aggressive giants, growing by nine fingers every month[3] nine fathoms tall at age nine, and only outshone in beauty by Orion.[4][5] The brothers wanted to storm Mt. Olympus and gain Artemis
Artemis
for Otus and Hera
Hera
for Ephialtes. Their plan, or construction, of a pile of mountains atop which they would confront the gods is described differently according to the author (including Homer, Virgil, and Ovid), and occasionally changed by translators
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Otos, Valencia
Otos is a municipality in the comarca of Vall d'Albaida in the Valencian
Valencian
Community, Spain.v t eMunicipalities of Vall d'AlbaidaAgullent Aielo de Malferit Aielo de Rugat Albaida Alfarrasí Atzeneta d'Albaida Bèlgida Bellús Beniatjar Benicolet Benigànim Benissoda Benissuera Bocairent Bufali Carrícola Castelló de Rugat Fontanars dels Alforins Guadasséquies Llutxent Montaverner Montitxelvo L'Olleria Ontinyent
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Cocytus
Cocytus
Cocytus
/koʊˈsaɪtəs/ or Kokytos /koʊˈkaɪtəs/ (Ancient Greek: Κωκυτός, literally "lamentation") is a river in the underworld in Greek mythology.[1] Cocytus
Cocytus
flows into the river Acheron, on the other side of which lies Hades, The Underworld, the mythological abode of the dead. There are five rivers encircling Hades: the Styx, Phlegethon, Lethe, Acheron
Acheron
and Cocytus. In literature[edit] The Cocytus
Cocytus
river was one of the rivers that surrounded Hades. Cocytus, along with the other rivers related to the underworld, was a common topic for ancient authors. Of the ancient authors, Cocytus
Cocytus
was mentioned by Dante, Virgil, Homer, Cicero, Aeschylus, Apuleius
Apuleius
and Plato, among others.[2] Cocytus
Cocytus
also makes an appearance in John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost
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Gustave Doré
Paul Gustave Louis Christophe Doré (/dɔːˈreɪ/; French: [ɡys.tav dɔ.ʁe]; 6 January 1832 – 23 January 1883) was a French artist, printmaker, illustrator, comics artist, caricaturist and sculptor who worked primarily with wood engraving.Contents1 Biography 2 Gallery 3 Works 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit]Doré by Carolus-Duran
Carolus-Duran
(1877)Doré was born in Strasbourg
Strasbourg
on 6 January 1832. By age five, he was a prodigy troublemaker, playing pranks that were mature beyond his years. Seven years later, he began carving in cement. At the age of fifteen Doré began his career working as a caricaturist for the French paper Le Journal pour rire,[1]. In the late 1840s and early 1850s he made several text comics, like Les Travaux d'Hercule (1847), Trois artistes incompris et mécontents (1851), Les Dés-agréments d'un voyage d'agrément (1851) and L'Histoire de la Sainte Russie (1854)
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Deer
Deer
Deer
(singular and plural) are the ruminant mammals forming the family Cervidae. The two main groups are the Cervinae, including the muntjac, the elk (wapiti), the fallow deer and the chital, and the Capreolinae, including the reindeer (caribou), the roe deer and the moose. Female reindeer, and male deer of all species (except the Chinese water deer), grow and shed new antlers each year
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Boeotia
Boeotia, sometimes alternatively Latinised as Boiotia, or Beotia (/biˈoʊʃiə, -ʃə/; Greek: Βοιωτία, Modern Greek: [vi.oˈti.a], Ancient Greek: [bojɔːtía]; modern transliteration Voiotía, also Viotía, formerly Cadmeis), is one of the regional units of Greece. It is part of the region of Central Greece
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Nightmare
A nightmare, also called a bad dream,[1] is an unpleasant dream that can cause a strong emotional response from the mind, typically fear but also despair, anxiety and great sadness. The dream may contain situations of discomfort, psychological or physical terror or panic. Sufferers often awaken in a state of distress and may be unable to return to sleep for a short period of time.[2] Nightmares can have physical causes such as sleeping in an uncomfortable or awkward position, having a fever, or psychological causes such as stress, anxiety, and as a side effect of various drugs, such as Psilocybin mushrooms
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Daimon
Dæmon is the Latin word for the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
daimōn (δαίμων: "god", "godlike", "power", "fate"),[1] which refers to the daemons of ancient Greek religion and mythology and of later Hellenistic
Hellenistic
religion and philosophy.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 In mythology and philosophy3.1 Socrates 3.2 Plato
Plato
and Proclus4 Categories 5 See also5.1 In fiction6 Notes 7 External linksEtymology[edit] Daemon comes from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word δαίμων, which originally referred to a lesser deity or guiding spirit
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Dante Alighieri
Dante Alighieri
Dante Alighieri
(Italian: [duˈrante deʎʎ aliˈɡjɛːri]), simply called Dante (Italian: [ˈdante], UK: /ˈdænti/, US: /ˈdɑːnteɪ/; c. 1265 – 1321), was a major Italian poet of the Late Middle Ages/Early Renaissance. His Divine Comedy, originally called Comedìa (modern Italian: Commedia) and later christened Divina by Boccaccio, is widely considered the most important poem of the Middle Ages and the greatest literary work in the Italian language.[1][2] In the late Middle Ages, most poetry was written in Latin, accessible only to the most educated readers. In De vulgari eloquentia
De vulgari eloquentia
(On Eloquence in the Vernacular), however, Dante defended use of the vernacular in literature
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Hell
Hell, in many religious and folkloric traditions, is a place or state of torment and punishment in an afterlife. Religions with a linear divine history often depict hells as eternal destinations while religions with a cyclic history often depict a hell as an intermediary period between incarnations. Typically these traditions locate hell in another dimension or under the Earth's surface and often include entrances to Hell
Hell
from the land of the living
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Gaia (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Gaia
Gaia
(/ˈɡeɪ.ə/ or /ˈɡaɪ.ə/ from Ancient Greek Γαῖα, a poetical form of Γῆ Gē, "land" or "earth"[1]), also spelled Gaea, is the personification of the Earth[2] and one of the Greek primordial deities. Gaia
Gaia
is the ancestral mother of all life: the primal Mother Earth
Earth
goddess. She is the immediate parent of Uranus (the sky), from whose sexual union she bore the Titans (themselves parents of many of the Olympian gods) and the Giants, and of Pontus (the sea), from whose union she bore the primordial sea gods
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Underworld
The underworld or netherworld is an otherworld thought to be deep underground or beneath the surface of the world in most religions and mythologies.[1] Typically, it is a place where the souls of the departed go, an afterlife or a realm of the dead
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Tartarus
In Greek mythology, Tartarus
Tartarus
(/ˈtɑːrtərəs/; Ancient Greek: Τάρταρος Tartaros)[1] is the deep abyss that is used as a dungeon of torment and suffering for the wicked and as the prison for the Titans. Tartarus
Tartarus
is the place where, according to Plato's Gorgias (c. 400 BC), souls are judged after death and where the wicked received divine punishment
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Olympian Gods
In ancient Greek religion and mythology, the twelve Olympians are the major deities of the Greek pantheon, commonly considered to be Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, Demeter, Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Ares, Aphrodite, Hephaestus, Hermes, and either Hestia
Hestia
or Dionysus.[2] They were called 'Olympians' because they were considered to reside on Mount Olympus. Although Hades
Hades
was a major ancient Greek god, and was the brother of the first generation of Olympians (Zeus, Poseidon, Hera, Demeter, and Hestia), he resided in the underworld, far from Olympus, and thus was not usually considered to be one of the Olympians. Besides the twelve Olympians, there were many other cultic groupings of twelve gods.Contents1 Olympians 2 Twelve gods 3 List 4 Genealogy 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesOlympians[edit] The Olympians were the principal deities of the Greek pantheon, so named because of their residency atop Mount Olympus
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Bacchus
Dionysus
Dionysus
(/daɪ.əˈnaɪsəs/; Greek: Διόνυσος Dionysos) is the god of the grape harvest, winemaking and wine, of ritual madness, fertility,[2][3] theatre and religious ecstasy in ancient Greek religion and myth. Wine
Wine
played an important role in Greek culture, and the cult of Dionysus
Dionysus
was the main religious focus for its unrestrained consumption.[4] His worship became firmly established in the seventh century BC.[5] He may have been worshipped as early as c. 1500–1100 BC by Mycenean Greeks;[6][7] traces of Dionysian-type cult have also been found in ancient Minoan Crete.[8] His origins are uncertain, and his cults took many forms; some are described by ancient sources as Thracian, others as Greek.[9][10][11] In some cults, he arrives from the east, as an Asiatic foreigner; in others, from Ethiopia
Ethiopia
in the South
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