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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Oxford English Dictionary
The Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University
Oxford University
Press. It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world.[2][3] The second edition came to 21,728 pages in 20 volumes, published in 1989. Work began on the dictionary in 1857, but it was not until 1884 that it began to be published in unbound fascicles as work continued on the project, under the name of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society
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University Of British Columbia
Coordinates: 49°15′40″N 123°15′11″W / 49.26111°N 123.25306°W / 49.26111; -123.25306University of British ColumbiaUniversity of British Columbia
British Columbia
coat of armsMotto Latin: Tuum EstMotto in EnglishIt is yours It is up to youEstablished 1908Endowment USD$1.142 billion (2016)[1]Budget CAD$2.1 billion[2]Chancellor Lindsay GordonPresident Santa J
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Henry More
Henry More
Henry More
FRS (/ˈmɔːr/; 12 October 1614 – 1 September 1687) was an English philosopher of the Cambridge Platonist school.Contents1 Biography 2 Views 3 Influence 4 Works 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Henry was born in Grantham, Lincolnshire on 12 October 1614.[1] He was the seventh son of Alexander More, mayor of Grantham, and Anne More (née Lacy).[1] Both his parents were Calvinists but he himself "could never swallow that hard doctrine."[citation needed] He was schooled at The King's School, Grantham
Grantham
and at Eton College. In 1631 he entered Christ's College, Cambridge, at about the time John Milton was leaving it
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List Of Oldest Universities In Continuous Operation
This article contains a list of the oldest existing universities in continuous operation in the world. Inclusion in this list is determined by the date at which the educational institute met the traditional definition of a university[Note 1] although it may have existed as a different kind of institute before that time.[1] This definition limits the term "university" to institutions with distinctive structural and legal features that developed in Europe, and which make the university form different from other institutions of higher learning in the pre-modern world. Thus, for the list below, the university must have been founded before 1500 in Europe or be the oldest university derived from the medieval European model in a country or region. It must also be still in operation, with institutional continuity retained throughout its history, and so some early universities, most notably the University of Paris, which was abolished by the Revolution in 1793[2], are excluded
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Jagiellonian University
The Jagiellonian University (Polish: Uniwersytet Jagielloński; Latin: Universitas Iagellonica Cracoviensis, also known as the University of Kraków) is a research university in Kraków, Poland. Founded in 1364 by Casimir III the Great, the Jagiellonian University is the oldest university in Poland, the second oldest university in Central Europe, and one of the oldest surviving universities in the world. Notable alumni include, among others, mathematician and astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus, Polish king John III Sobieski, Pope John Paul II, and Nobel laureates Ivo Andrić and Wisława Szymborska. The campus of the Jagiellonian University is centrally located within the city of Kraków. The university consists of fifteen faculties — including the humanities, law, the natural and social sciences, and medicine. The university employs roughly 4,000 academics, and has more than 40,000 students who study in some 80 disciplines.[2] More than half of the student body are women
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Salzburg
Salzburg
Salzburg
(German pronunciation: [ˈzaltsbʊɐ̯k] ( listen);[note 1] Austro-Bavarian: Såizburg; literally: "Salt Fortress") is the fourth-largest city in Austria
Austria
and the capital of the federal state of Salzburg. Salzburg's "Old Town" (Altstadt) is internationally renowned for its baroque architecture and is one of the best-preserved city centers north of the Alps. It was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
in 1997. The city has three universities and a large population of students. Tourists also visit Salzburg
Salzburg
to tour the historic center and the scenic Alpine surroundings. Salzburg
Salzburg
was the birthplace of 18th-century composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
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European Academy Of Sciences And Arts
The European Academy of Sciences and Arts (Latin: Academia Scientiarum et Artium Europaea) is a learned society of around 1,700[1] top scientists and artists who approach the questions facing Europe and the globe in various colloquia and publications
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College Of William & Mary
The College of William & Mary in Virginia (also known as William & Mary, or W&M) is a public research university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. Royally founded in 1693 by letters patent issued by King William III and Queen Mary II, it is the second-oldest institution of higher education in the United States, after Harvard University. William and Mary is the oldest college in the Commonwealth of Virginia and the oldest institution of higher education in the American South. In his 1985 book Public Ivies: A Guide to America's Best Public Undergraduate Colleges and Universities, Richard Moll categorized William & Mary as one of eight "Public Ivies". William & Mary educated American Presidents Thomas Jefferson (third), James Monroe (fifth), and John Tyler (tenth) as well as other key figures important to the development of the nation, including the fourth U.S
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Williamsburg, Virginia
Williamsburg is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,068. In 2014, the population was estimated to be 14,691. Located on the Virginia
Virginia
Peninsula, Williamsburg is in the northern part of the Hampton Roads
Hampton Roads
metropolitan area. It is bordered by James City County and York County. Williamsburg was founded in 1632 as Middle Plantation, a fortified settlement on high ground between the James and York rivers. The city served as the capital of the Colony and Commonwealth of Virginia
Virginia
from 1699 to 1780 and was the center of political events in Virginia leading to the American Revolution
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Queen's University
Queen's University
Queen's University
at Kingston[2][12][13] (commonly shortened to Queen's University
Queen's University
or Queen's) is a public research university in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Founded on 16 October 1841 via a royal charter issued by Queen Victoria, the university predates Canada's founding by 26 years.[2] Queen's holds more than 1,400 hectares (3,500 acres) of land throughout Ontario
Ontario
and owns Herstmonceux Castle
Herstmonceux Castle
in East Sussex, England.[9] Queen's is organized into ten undergraduate, graduate, and professional faculties and schools.[14] The Church of Scotland
Church of Scotland
established Queen's College in 1841 with a royal charter from Queen Victoria
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Kingston, Ontario
Mark Gerretsen (LPC) Scott Reid (CPC) • MPP (Provincial) Sophie Kiwala (OLP)Area • Land 451.19 km2 (174.21 sq mi) • Metro 1,906.82 km2 (736.23 sq mi)Elevation 93 m (305 ft)Population (2016) • City (single-tier) 123,798 • Density 274.4/km2 (711/sq mi) • Metro 161,175 • Metro density 83.1/km2 (215/sq mi)  source:[2]Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC−5) • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC−4)Postal code span K7K through K7PArea code(s) 613 343Website www.cityofkingston.ca"View of Frontenac or Cataracoui in 1759"
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University Of Illinois At Urbana–Champaign
The University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (also known as U of I, Illinois, or colloquially as the University of Illinois or UIUC)[7][8] is a public research university in the U.S. state of Illinois
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William Perkins (theologian)
William Perkins (1558–1602) was an influential English cleric and Cambridge theologian, receiving both a B.A. and M.A. from the university in 1581 and 1584 respectively, and also one of the foremost leaders of the Puritan movement in the Church of England during the Elizabethan era. Although not entirely accepting of the Church of England's ecclesiastical practices, Perkins conformed to many of the policies and procedures imposed by the Elizabethan Settlement. He did remain, however, sympathetic to the non-conformist puritans and even faced disciplinary action for his support. Perkins was a prolific author who penned over forty works, many of which were published posthumously. In addition to writing, he also served as a fellow at Christ's College and as a lecturer at St Andrew's Church in Cambridge. He was a firm proponent of Reformed theology, particularly the supralapsarian theology of Theodore Beza and John Calvin
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Palatine Hill
The Palatine Hill (/ˈpælətaɪn/; Latin: Collis Palatium or Mons Palatinus; Italian: Palatino [palaˈtiːno]) is the centremost of the Seven Hills of Rome
Rome
and is one of the most ancient parts of the city. It stands 40 metres[1] above the Roman Forum, looking down upon it on one side, and upon the Circus Maximus
Circus Maximus
on the other
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Daniel Chester French
Daniel Chester French
Chester French
(April 20, 1850 – October 7, 1931), one of the most prolific and acclaimed American sculptors of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, is best known for his design of the monumental work, the statue of Abraham Lincoln (1920) in the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, DC.Contents1 Life and career 2 Legacy 3 Works3.1 Notable public monuments4 Gallery4.1 Architectural sculpture 4.2 Cemetery monuments 4.3 Selected museum pieces 4.4 Miscellaneous pieces5 References 6 External linksLife and career[edit] French was born in Exeter, New Hampshire, to Henry Flagg French (1813–1885), a lawyer, judge, Assistant US Treasury Secretary, and author of a book that described the French drain,[1] and his wife Anne Richardson.[2] In 1867, French moved with his family to Concord, Massachusetts,[3] where he was a neighbor and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson, and the Alcott family
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