HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Alluvium
Alluvium
Alluvium
(from the Latin
Latin
alluvius, from alluere, "to wash against") is loose, unconsolidated (not cemented together into a solid rock) soil or sediments, which has been eroded, reshaped by water in some form, and redeposited in a non-marine setting.[1][2] Alluvium
Alluvium
is typically made up of a variety of materials, including fine particles of silt and clay and larger particles of sand and gravel. When this loose alluvial material is deposited or cemented into a lithological unit, or lithified, it is called an alluvial deposit.[3]Contents1 Definitions 2 Age 3 Ores 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDefinitions[edit] The term "alluvium" is not typically used in situations where the formation of the sediment can clearly be attributed to another geologic process that is well described
[...More...]

"Alluvium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Alluvial (horse)
Alluvial (foaled 1969 in Kentucky) was an American Thoroughbred broodmare. Background[edit] Alluvial was sired by U.S. Racing Hall of Fame inductee Buckpasser, who in turn was sired by the 1953 United States
United States
Horse of the Year, Tom Fool, out of the Hill Prince mare Bayou. Alluvial was a half-sister, through Bayou, to the graded stakes race winning filly Batteur, who won the Santa Monica Handicap, Santa Margarita Handicap, Santa Maria Handicap, and Santa Barbara Handicap, as well as the New York Handicap. Breeding record[edit] Alluvial was unraced and is best known not for her racing success as a graded stakes race winner but for her success as a broodmare
[...More...]

"Alluvial (horse)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ore
An ore is an occurrence of rock or sediment that contains sufficient minerals with economically important elements, typically metals, that can be economically extracted from the deposit.[1] The ores are extracted from the earth through mining; they are then refined (often via smelting) to extract the valuable element, or elements. The grade or concentration of an ore mineral, or metal, as well as its form of occurrence, will directly affect the costs associated with mining the ore. The cost of extraction must thus be weighed against the metal value contained in the rock to determine what ore can be processed and what ore is of too low a grade to be worth mining. Metal ores are generally oxides, sulfides, silicates, or native metals (such as native copper) that are not commonly concentrated in the Earth's crust, or noble metals (not usually forming compounds) such as gold. The ores must be processed to extract the elements of interest from the waste rock and from the ore minerals
[...More...]

"Ore" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Glacial Till
Till
Till
or glacial till is unsorted glacial sediment. Till
Till
is derived from the erosion and entrainment of material by the moving ice of a glacier. It is deposited some distance down-ice to form terminal, lateral, medial and ground moraines. Till
Till
is classified into primary deposits, laid down directly by glaciers, and secondary deposits, reworked by fluvial transport and other processes.Contents1 Processes 2 Tillite 3 Types 4 See also 5 ReferencesProcesses[edit] Glacial drift is the coarsely graded and extremely heterogeneous sediment of a glacier; till is the part of glacial drift deposited directly by the glacier. Its content may vary from clays to mixtures of clay, sand, gravel, and boulders. This material is mostly derived from the subglacial erosion and entrainment by the moving ice of the glaciers of previously available unconsolidated sediments
[...More...]

"Glacial Till" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Alluvial Diagram
Alluvial diagrams are a type of flow diagram originally developed to represent changes in network structure over time. In allusion to both their visual appearance and their emphasis on flow, alluvial diagrams are named after alluvial fans that are naturally formed by the soil deposited from streaming water.Contents1 Interpretation 2 Application 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksInterpretation[edit] In an alluvial diagram, blocks represent clusters of nodes, and stream fields between the blocks represent changes in the composition of these clusters over time. The height of a block represents the size of the cluster and the height of a stream field represents the size of the components contained in both blocks connected by the stream field. Application[edit] Alluvial diagrams were originally developed to visualize structural change in large complex networks
[...More...]

"Alluvial Diagram" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quaternary
Quaternary
Quaternary
( /kwəˈtɜːrnəri/) is the current and most recent of the three periods of the Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era in the geologic time scale of the
[...More...]

"Quaternary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bedrock
In geology, bedrock is the lithified rock that lies under a loose softer material called regolith at the surface of the Earth or other terrestrial planets. The broken and weathered regolith includes soil and subsoil. The surface of the bedrock beneath the soil cover is known as rockhead in engineering geology,[1][2] and its identification by digging, drilling or geophysical methods is an important task in most civil engineering projects
[...More...]

"Bedrock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sedimentary Basin
Sedimentary basins are regions of Earth
Earth
of long-term subsidence creating accommodation space for infilling by sediments.[1] The subsidence can result from a variety of causes that include: the thinning of underlying crust, sedimentary, volcanic, and tectonic loading, and changes in the thickness or density of adjacent lithosphere.[2] Sedimentary basins occur in diverse geological settings usually associated with plate tectonic activity. Basins are classified structurally in various ways, with a primary classifications distinguishing among basins formed in various plate tectonic regime (divergent, convergent, transform, intraplate), the proximity of the basin to the active plate margins, and whether oceanic, continental or transitional crust underlies the basin.[1][2][3] Basins formed in different plate tectonic regimes vary in their preservation potential
[...More...]

"Sedimentary Basin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pliocene
The Pliocene
Pliocene
( /ˈplaɪəˌsiːn/;[2][3] also Pleiocene[4]) Epoch is the epoch in the geologic timescale that extends from 5.333 million to 2.58[5] million years BP. It is the second and youngest epoch of the Neogene
Neogene
Period in the Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era. The Pliocene
Pliocene
follows the Miocene Epoch and is followed by the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
Epoch. Prior to the 2009 revision of the geologic time scale, which placed the four most recent major glaciations entirely within the Pleistocene, the Pliocene
Pliocene
also included the Gelasian stage, which lasted from 2.588 to 1.806 million years ago, and is now included in the Pleistocene.[6] As with other older geologic periods, the geological strata that define the start and end are well identified but the exact dates of the start and end of the epoch are slightly uncertain
[...More...]

"Pliocene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Miocene
The Miocene
Miocene
( /ˈmaɪəˌsiːn/[2][3]) is the first geological epoch of the Neogene
Neogene
Period and extends from about 23.03 to 5.333 million years ago (Ma). The Miocene
Miocene
was named by Charles Lyell; its name comes from the Greek words μείων (meiōn, “less”) and καινός (kainos, “new”)[4] and means "less recent" because it has 18% fewer modern sea invertebrates than the Pliocene. The Miocene follows the Oligocene
Oligocene
and is followed by the Pliocene. As the earth went from the Oligocene
Oligocene
through the Miocene
Miocene
and into the Pliocene, the climate slowly cooled towards a series of ice ages
[...More...]

"Miocene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gold
Gold
Gold
is a chemical element with symbol Au (from Latin: aurum) and atomic number 79, making it one of the higher atomic number elements that occur naturally. In its purest form, it is a bright, slightly reddish yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal and a group 11 element. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions. Gold
Gold
often occurs in free elemental (native) form, as nuggets or grains, in rocks, in veins, and in alluvial deposits. It occurs in a solid solution series with the native element silver (as electrum) and also naturally alloyed with copper and palladium
[...More...]

"Gold" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lithification
Lithification (from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word lithos meaning 'rock' and the Latin-derived suffix -ific) is the process in which sediments compact under pressure, expel connate fluids, and gradually become solid rock. Essentially, lithification is a process of porosity destruction through compaction and cementation. Lithification includes all the processes which convert unconsolidated sediments into sedimentary rocks. Petrifaction, though often used as a synonym, is more specifically used to describe the replacement of organic material by silica in the formation of fossils.[1] See also[edit]DiagenesisReferences[edit]^ Monroe, J.S.; Wicander, R.; Hazlett, R.W. (2006). Physical Geology: Exploring the Earth (6th ed.). Belmont: Thomson. pp. 203–204. ISBN 9780495011484. This geology article is a stub
[...More...]

"Lithification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gemstone
A gemstone (also called a gem, fine gem, jewel, precious stone, or semi-precious stone) is a piece of mineral crystal which, in cut and polished form, is used to make jewelry or other adornments.[1][2] However, certain rocks (such as lapis lazuli, opal, and jade) or organic materials that are not minerals (such as amber, jet, and pearl) are also used for jewelry and are therefore often considered to be gemstones as well. Most gemstones are hard, but some soft minerals are used in jewelry because of their luster or other physical properties that have aesthetic value. Rarity is another characteristic that lends value to a gemstone. Apart from jewelry, from earliest antiquity engraved gems and hardstone carvings, such as cups, were major luxury art forms. A gem maker is called a lapidary or gemcutter; a diamond worker is a diamantaire
[...More...]

"Gemstone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bay Mud
Bay mud
Bay mud
consists of thick deposits of soft, unconsolidated silty clay, which is saturated with water; these soil layers are situated at the bottom of certain estuaries, which are normally in temperate regions that have experienced cyclical glacial cycles
[...More...]

"Bay Mud" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Braided Stream
A braided river, or braided channel, consists of a network of river channels separated by small and often temporary islands called braid bars or, in British usage, aits or eyots. Braided streams occur in rivers with low slope and/or large sediment load.[1] Braided channels are also typical of environments that dramatically decrease channel depth, and consequently channel velocity, such as river deltas, alluvial fans and peneplains.Contents1 Formation 2 Examples 3 Braided rivers vs anastomosing rivers 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksFormation[edit]The White River in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Washington transports a large sediment load from the Emmons Glacier
Emmons Glacier
of Mount Rainier, a young, rapidly eroding volcano.Braided rivers, as distinct from meandering rivers, occur when a threshold level of sediment load or slope is reached whilst a steep gradient is also maintained
[...More...]

"Braided Stream" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Desert Pavement
A desert pavement, also called reg (in the western Sahara), serir (eastern Sahara), gibber (in Australia), or saï (central Asia)[1] is a desert surface covered with closely packed, interlocking angular or rounded rock fragments of pebble and cobble size. They typically top alluvial fans.[2] Desert varnish
Desert varnish
collects on the exposed surface rocks over time. Geologists debate the mechanics of pavement formation and their age.Contents1 Formation 2 Local names 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksFormation[edit] Several theories have been proposed for the formation of desert pavements.[3] A common theory suggests they form through the gradual removal of sand, dust and other fine-grained material by the wind and intermittent rain, leaving the larger fragments behind
[...More...]

"Desert Pavement" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.