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Allen Young
Sir Allen William Young, CB, CVO (12 December 1827–20 November 1915) was an English master mariner and explorer, best remembered for his role in Arctic
Arctic
exploration including the search for Sir John Franklin.Contents1 Early life 2 The Fox Expedition 3 The Pandora Expeditions 4 Leigh Smith Relief Expedition 5 Later Ventures 6 Other activities 7 Notes 8 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Allen Young
Allen Young
was born at Twickenham
Twickenham
on 12 December 1827, and went to sea as a midshipman in the merchant marine in 1842. By 1853 he was master of the Blackwall Frigate
Blackwall Frigate
Marlborough and made two round voyages between England and Australia
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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James Gordon Bennett, Jr.
James Gordon Bennett Jr.
James Gordon Bennett Jr.
(May 10, 1841 – May 14, 1918) was publisher of the New York Herald, founded by his father, James Gordon Bennett Sr. (1795–1872), who emigrated from Scotland. He was generally known as Gordon Bennett to distinguish him from his father.[1] Among his many sports-related accomplishments he organized both the first polo match and the first tennis match in the United States, and he personally won the first trans-oceanic yacht race
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Benjamin Leigh Smith
Benjamin (Ben) Leigh Smith (12 March 1828 – 4 January 1913)[1] was an English yachtsman and explorer. Early life[edit] He was born in Sussex, the extramarital child of Anne Longden, a milliner from Alfreton, and the Whig politician Benjamin (Ben) Leigh Smith (1783–1860), the only son of the Radical abolitionist William Smith. Benjamin senior had four sisters. One, Frances (Fanny) Smith, married into the Nightingale family and produced a daughter, Florence Nightingale, the nurse and statistician; another married into the Bonham Carter family. William Smith wanted his son to marry Mary Shore, the sister of William Nightingale, now a relative by marriage. Benjamin Senior's home was in Marylebone, London, but in 1816, he inherited and purchased property near Hastings: Brown's Farm near Robertsbridge, with a house built around 1700 (extant), and Crowham Manor, Westfield, which included 200 acres (0.81 km2). Although a member of the landed gentry, Smith held radical views
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Southampton
Southampton (/saʊθˈæmptən, -hæmptən/ ( listen)) is the largest city in the ceremonial county of Hampshire, England. It is 69 miles (111 km) south-west of London and 15 miles (24 km) west north-west of Portsmouth[6][7] Southampton is a major port and the closest city to the New Forest. It lies at the northernmost point of Southampton Water at the confluence of the Rivers Test and Itchen,[8] with the River Hamble joining to the south of the urban area
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Franz Josef Land
Franz Josef Land, Franz Joseph Land or Francis Joseph's Land (Russian: Земля́ Фра́нца-Ио́сифа, tr. Zemlya Frantsa-Iosifa) is an archipelago, inhabited only by Russian military base personnel,[1] located in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea
Barents Sea
and Kara Sea, constituting the northernmost part of Arkhangelsk Oblast
Arkhangelsk Oblast
in Russia. It consists of 191 islands, which cover an area of 16,134 square kilometers (6,229 sq mi), stretching 375 kilometers (233 mi) from east to west and 234 kilometers (145 mi) from north to south. The islands are categorized in three groups, a western, central and eastern, separated by the British Channel and the Austrian Strait. The central group is further divided into a northern and southern section by the Markham Strait
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British Royal Navy
The Royal Navy
Navy
(RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service. From the middle decades of the 17th century, and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century, it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
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Sudan
The Sudan
Sudan
or Sudan
Sudan
(/suːˈdæn, -ˈdɑːn/ ( listen);[8][9] Arabic: السودان‎ as-Sūdān) also known as North Sudan
Sudan
since South Sudan's independence and officially the Republic
Republic
of the Sudan[10] (Arabic: جمهورية السودان‎ Jumhūriyyat as-Sūdān), is a country in Northern Africa. It is bordered by Egypt to the north, the Red Sea, Eritrea
Eritrea
and Ethiopia
Ethiopia
to the east, South Sudan
Sudan
to the south, the Central African Republic
Central African Republic
to the southwest, Chad
Chad
to the west and Libya
Libya
to the northwest
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Prince Of Wales
Prince of Wales
Wales
(Welsh: Tywysog Cymru) was a title granted to princes born in Wales
Wales
from the 12th century onwards; the term replaced the use of the word king. One of the last Welsh princes, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, was killed in battle in 1282 by Edward I, King of England, whose son Edward (born in Caernarfon Castle
Caernarfon Castle
in Wales) was invested as the first English Prince of Wales
Wales
in 1301. Since the 14th century, the title has been a dynastic title granted to the heir apparent to the English or British monarch, but the failure to be granted the title does not affect the rights to royal succession. The title is granted to the heir apparent as a personal honour or dignity, and is not heritable, merging with the Crown on accession to the throne
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Edward VII Of The United Kingdom
Edward VII
Edward VII
(Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions
British Dominions
and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death in 1910. The eldest son of Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Edward was related to royalty throughout Europe. Before his accession to the throne, he was heir apparent and held the title of Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
for longer than any of his predecessors. During the long reign of his mother, he was largely excluded from political power, and came to personify the fashionable, leisured elite. He travelled throughout Britain performing ceremonial public duties, and represented Britain on visits abroad
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Troop Ship
A troopship (also troop ship or troop transport or trooper) is a ship used to carry soldiers, either in peacetime or wartime. Operationally, standard troopships – often drafted from commercial shipping fleets – cannot land troops directly on shore, typically loading and unloading at a seaport or onto smaller vessels, either tenders or barges. Attack transports, a variant of ocean-going troopship adapted to transporting invasion forces ashore, carry their own fleet of landing craft. Landing ships beach themselves and bring their troops directly ashore.Contents1 History 2 World War II2.1 Designation3 Post-World War II 4 Some notable troopships 5 References5.1 Bibliography 5.2 Notes6 External linksHistory[edit] Ships to transport troops were already used in Antiquity
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Crimean War
223,513  Ottoman Empire 45,400[2] 10,100 killed in action 10,800 died of wounds 24,500 died of disease French Empire 135,485[2] 8,490 killed in action; 11,750 died of wounds; 75,375 died of disease 39,870 wounded  British Empire 40,462[2] 2,755 killed in action 1,847 died of wounds 17,580 died of disease 18,280 wounded  Kingdom of Sardinia 2,166[2] 28 killed in action 2,138 died of disease 530,125[2] 35,671 killed in action 37,454 died of wounds 377,000 died from non-combat causes 80,000 wounded[3][4]v t eCrimean WarBalkansOltenița Sinop Cetate Calafat SilistraCaucasusKurekdere KarsNaval OperationsSuomenlinna Bomarsund PetropavlovskCrimeaAlma Sevastopol Balaclava Inkerman Eupatoria Taganrog Chernaya Malakoff Great Redan Kinburnv t eRusso-Ottoman Wars1568–70 1676–81 1686–1700 1710–11 1735–39 1768–74 1787–92 1806–12 1828–29 1853–56 1877–78 1914–18Russ
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of AustraliaFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Advance Australia
Australia
Fair"[N 1]Capital Canberra 35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest city SydneyNational language English[N 2]DemonymAustralian Aussie
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Blackwall Frigate
Blackwall frigate
Blackwall frigate
was the colloquial name for a type of three-masted full-rigged ship built between the late 1830s and the mid-1870s. They were originally intended as replacements for the British East Indiaman in the trade between England, the Cape of Good Hope, India and China, but from the 1850s were also employed in the trade between England, Australia
Australia
and New Zealand.[1] The first Blackwall frigates were designed and built by Wigram and Green at Blackwall Yard
Blackwall Yard
on the River Thames
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Midshipman
A midshipman is an officer of the junior-most rank, in the Royal Navy, United States Navy, and many Commonwealth navies. Commonwealth countries which use the rank include Canada (Naval Cadet), Australia, Bangladesh, Namibia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Pakistan, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and Kenya. In the 17th century, a midshipman was a rating for an experienced seaman, and the word derives from the area aboard a ship, amidships, either where the original rating worked on the ship, or where he was berthed. Beginning in the 18th century, a commissioned officer candidate was rated as a midshipman, and the seaman rating began to slowly die out. By the Napoleonic era
Napoleonic era
(1793–1815), a midshipman was an apprentice officer who had previously served at least three years as a volunteer, officer's servant or able seaman, and was roughly equivalent to a present-day petty officer in rank and responsibilities
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