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Alishan National Scenic Area
Coordinates: 23°31′N 120°48′E / 23.517°N 120.800°E / 23.517; 120.800 The Alishan National Scenic Area
Alishan National Scenic Area
is a mountain resort and natural preserve located in Alishan Township, Chiayi County, Taiwan.[citation needed]Contents1 Geography 2 Climate 3 Topography 4 Vegetation and wildlife 5 History 6 Attractions and landmarks 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 External linksGeography[edit]Alishan Forest Park.Dawn view from Alishan.Alishan is 415 square kilometres (41,500 ha) in area. Notable characteristics include mountain wilderness, four villages, waterfalls, high altitude tea plantations, the Alishan Forest Railway, and a number of hiking trails. The area is popular with tourists and mountain climbers. Alishan, itself has become one of the major landmarks associated with Taiwan
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Bamboo Shoot
Bamboo
Bamboo
shoots or bamboo sprouts are the edible shoots (new bamboo culms that come out of the ground) of many bamboo species including Bambusa vulgaris
Bambusa vulgaris
and Phyllostachys edulis. They are used in numerous Asian dishes and broths. They are sold in various processed shapes, and are available in fresh, dried, and canned versions. Raw bamboo shoots contain cyanogenic glycosides, natural toxins also contained in cassava.[1] The toxins must be destroyed by thorough cooking and for this reason fresh bamboo shoots are often boiled before being used in other ways
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Pinaceae
Subfamily Pinoideae Pinus
Pinus
– pines (c. 115)Subfamily Piceoideae Picea
Picea
– spruces (c
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Chamaecyparis Formosensis
Chamaecyparis
Chamaecyparis
formosensis (Formosan cypress, Taiwan
Taiwan
cypress;[1] Chinese: 紅檜/红桧 hong guei) is a species of Chamaecyparis, endemic to Taiwan, where it grows in the central mountains at moderate to high altitudes of 1000–2900 m. It is threatened by habitat loss and over-cutting for its valuable timber.[1][2][3]Contents1 Growth 2 Related species 3 Characteristics 4 References 5 External linksGrowth[edit] It is a slow-growing, but long-lived and ultimately large to very large coniferous tree growing to 55–60 m tall with a trunk up to 7 m in diameter. The bark is red-brown, vertically fissured and with a stringy texture. The foliage is arranged in flat sprays; adult leaves are scale-like, 1–3 mm long, with pointed tips, green both above and below with only an inconspicuous stomatal band at the base of each scale-leaf; they are arranged in opposite decussate pairs on the shoots
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Chamaecyparis Taiwanensis
Chamaecyparis
Chamaecyparis
taiwanensis ( Taiwan
Taiwan
Cypress; simplified Chinese: 台湾扁柏; traditional Chinese: 臺灣扁柏; pinyin: tái wān biǎn bǎi) is a species of cypress, native to the mountains of Taiwan, where it grows at altitudes of 1300–2800 m.[1][2]Contents1 Description 2 Taxonomy 3 Related species 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] It is a slow-growing coniferous tree growing to 40 m tall with a trunk up to 2 m in diameter. The bark is red-brown, vertically fissured and with a stringy texture. The foliage is arranged in flat sprays; adult leaves are scale-like, 0.8–1.5 mm long, with acute tips (unlike the blunt tips of the leaves of the closely related Japanese Chamaecyparis
Chamaecyparis
obtusa (Hinoki Cypress), green above, green below with a white stomatal band at the base of each scale-leaf; they are arranged in opposite decussate pairs on the shoots
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Cunninghamia
Cunninghamia konishii
Cunninghamia konishii
Hayata Cunninghamia lanceolata
Cunninghamia lanceolata
(Lamb.) Hook.Synonyms[1]Belis Salisb. Jacularia Raf. Raxopitys J.Nelson Cunninghamia
Cunninghamia
is a genus of one[2] or two living species of evergreen coniferous trees in the cypress family Cupressaceae.[3] They are native to China, northern Vietnam
Vietnam
and Laos, and perhaps also Cambodia.[2] They may reach 50 m (160 ft) in height.[2] In vernacular use, it is most often known as Cunninghamia, but is also sometimes called "China-fir" (though it is not a fir). The genus name Cunninghamia
Cunninghamia
honours Dr
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Pinus Taiwanensis
Pinus
Pinus
taiwanensis, the Taiwan
Taiwan
red pine, is a species of conifer in the Pinaceae
Pinaceae
family. It is found only in Taiwan. It is a close relative of Pinus
Pinus
luchuensis of Japan
Japan
and Pinus
Pinus
hwangshanensis of China, sometimes considered as a subspecies of the former.[2] Sometimes Pinus hwangshanensis from China
China
are also referred to as P. taiwanensis.[3] Taiwan
Taiwan
red pine is a large tree, with a straight trunk up to 35 m (115 ft) tall and 80 cm (2.6 ft) in diameter. Needles are in bundles of two. Cones are 6–7 cm (2.4–2.8 in) long
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Taiwan Red Pine
Pinus
Pinus
taiwanensis, the Taiwan
Taiwan
red pine, is a species of conifer in the Pinaceae
Pinaceae
family. It is found only in Taiwan. It is a close relative of Pinus
Pinus
luchuensis of Japan
Japan
and Pinus
Pinus
hwangshanensis of China, sometimes considered as a subspecies of the former.[2] Sometimes Pinus hwangshanensis from China
China
are also referred to as P. taiwanensis.[3] Taiwan
Taiwan
red pine is a large tree, with a straight trunk up to 35 m (115 ft) tall and 80 cm (2.6 ft) in diameter. Needles are in bundles of two. Cones are 6–7 cm (2.4–2.8 in) long
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Picea Morrisonicola
Picea morrisonicola, the Taiwan
Taiwan
spruce, is a species of conifer in the Pinaceae
Pinaceae
family. It is found only in Taiwan, and it is the only species of spruce in Taiwan. Taiwan
Taiwan
spruce is a large tree, up to 50 m (160 ft) in height and 1.5 m (4 ft 11 in) in diameter. It grows at altitudes of about 2,000–2,500 m (6,600–8,200 ft) in the Central Mountain Range in ravines and mountain slopes, usually mixed with other trees.[2] Taiwan
Taiwan
spruce is one of the most important timber species in Taiwan. Populations have declined because of overexploitation.[3] References[edit]^ Zhang, D.; Katsuki, T. & Rushforth, K. (2013). "Picea morrisonicola". The IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2013: e.T34383A2852220
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Pseudotsuga Sinensis
Pseudotsuga
Pseudotsuga
sinensis (Chinese Douglas-fir; in Chinese 黃杉, pinyin romanization: huáng shān) is a species of conifer in the Pinaceae family. It is a tree up to 50 metres tall.[2] It is found in China
China
(in Anhui, Fujian, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Shaanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan, and Zhejiang provinces) and Taiwan[1] as well as in northernmost parts of Vietnam.[3] The timber is used for construction, bridge building, furniture, and wood fiber.[2][4] Pseudotsuga
Pseudotsuga
sinensis var. wilsoniana, Taiwan
Taiwan
Douglas-fir, is sometimes treated as its own species, Pseudotsuga
Pseudotsuga
wilsoniana. This variety is geographically isolated (being restricted to Taiwan) but is not markedly distinct morphologically from var. sinensis of China.[4] References[edit]^ a b Conifer
Conifer
Specialist Group (1998)
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Chinese Douglas-fir
Pseudotsuga
Pseudotsuga
sinensis (Chinese Douglas-fir; in Chinese 黃杉, pinyin romanization: huáng shān) is a species of conifer in the Pinaceae family. It is a tree up to 50 metres tall.[2] It is found in China
China
(in Anhui, Fujian, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Shaanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan, and Zhejiang provinces) and Taiwan[1] as well as in northernmost parts of Vietnam.[3] The timber is used for construction, bridge building, furniture, and wood fiber.[2][4] Pseudotsuga
Pseudotsuga
sinensis var. wilsoniana, Taiwan
Taiwan
Douglas-fir, is sometimes treated as its own species, Pseudotsuga
Pseudotsuga
wilsoniana. This variety is geographically isolated (being restricted to Taiwan) but is not markedly distinct morphologically from var. sinensis of China.[4] References[edit]^ a b Conifer
Conifer
Specialist Group (1998)
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Abies Kawakamii
Abies
Abies
kawakamii is a species of conifer in the Pinaceae
Pinaceae
family. It is found only in Taiwan. First described in 1908 by Bunzō Hayata as a variety of Abies
Abies
mariesii, a high-mountain fir native to Japan; the next year it was elevated to species rank by Tokutarô Itô. Abies kawakamii is exclusively native to the island of Taiwan, and is one of the southernmost true firs (together with A. fansipanensis, native to Vietnam, and A. guatemalensis, from Mexico
Mexico
and Guatemala)
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Tsuga Chinensis
Tsuga
Tsuga
chinensis, commonly referred to as the Taiwan
Taiwan
or Chinese hemlock, or in Chinese as tieshan (simplified Chinese: 铁杉; traditional Chinese: 鐵杉; pinyin: tiěshān; literally: "iron fir"), is a coniferous tree species native to China, Taiwan, Tibet
Tibet
and Vietnam. The tree is quite variable and has many recognised varieties, though some are also maintained to be separate species by certain authorities. The tree was recently discovered in the mountains of northern Vietnam, making that the southernmost extension of its range.Contents1 Description 2 Range and habitat 3 Taxonomy 4 Uses 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] Tsuga
Tsuga
chinensis is a large tree with bark that is a blackish brown in colour. The scaly bark has irregular longitudinal breaks, and lenticels that are very inconspicuous
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Taiwania
Taiwania, with the single living species Taiwania
Taiwania
cryptomerioides, is a large coniferous tree in the cypress family Cupressaceae.Contents1 Range 2 Morphology 3 History 4 References 5 External linksRange[edit] Taiwania
Taiwania
cryptomerioides in the botanical magazine Shokubutsugaku zasshi (1907) Taiwania
Taiwania
cryptomerioides' needle-like leaves.The genus was formerly placed in the segregate family Taxodiaceae, it is now included in the monotypic subfamily Taiwanioideae of the family Cupressaceae. It is native to eastern Asia, growing in the mountains of central Taiwan, and locally in southwest China
China
(Guizhou, Hubei, Sichuan, Yunnan, Tibet) and adjoining Myanmar, and northern Vietnam.[2][3] It is endangered by illegal logging for its valuable wood in many areas
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Temple (Chinese)
A temple (from the Latin
Latin
word templum) is a structure reserved for religious or spiritual rituals and activities such as prayer and sacrifice. It is typically used for such buildings belonging to all faiths where a more specific term such as church, mosque or synagogue is not generally used in English. These include Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism
Jainism
among religions with many modern followers, as well as other ancient religions such as Ancient Egyptian religion. The form and function of temples is thus very variable, though they are often considered by believers to be in some sense the "house" of one or more deities. Typically offerings of some sort are made to the deity, and other rituals enacted, and a special group of clergy maintain, and operate the temple
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Taiwanese Aborigines
RecognizedAmis Atayal Bunun Hla'alua Kavalan Kanakanavu Paiwan Puyuma Rukai Saisiyat Sakizaya Seediq Tao Thao Tsou TrukuLocally RecognizedMakatao Siraya TaivoanUnrecognizedBabuza Basay Hoanya Ketagalan Luilang Pazeh/Kaxabu Papora Qauqaut Taokas Trobiawanv t eTaiwanese aborigines, also known as Formosan people, Austronesian Taiwanese[3][4] or Gaoshan,[1] are the indigenous peoples of Taiwan, who number more than 530,000 and constitute nearly 2.3% of the country's population
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