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Algernon Charles Swinburne
Algernon Charles Swinburne
Algernon Charles Swinburne
(5 April 1837 – 10 April 1909) was an English poet, playwright, novelist, and critic. He wrote several novels and collections of poetry such as Poems and Ballads, and contributed to the famous Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. Swinburne wrote about many taboo topics, such as lesbianism, cannibalism, sado-masochism, and anti-theism. His poems have many common motifs, such as the ocean, time, and death
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Kingdom Of Northumbria
The Kingdom of Northumbria (/nɔːrˈθʌmbriə/; Old English: Norþanhymbra rīce[1]) was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now northern England and south-east Scotland. The name derives from the Old English Norþan-hymbre meaning "the people or province north of the Humber,"[2] which reflects the approximate southern limit to the kingdom's territory, the Humber Estuary. Northumbria started to consolidate into one kingdom in the early seventh century. At its height, the kingdom extended from just south of the Humber to the River Mersey and to the Firth of Forth, in Scotland. Northumbria ceased to be an independent kingdom in the mid-tenth century. Northumbria is also used in the names of some North East regional institutions, particularly the police force (Northumbria Police, which covers Northumberland and Tyne and Wear), a university (Northumbria University) based in Newcastle upon Tyne and Northumbria Army Cadet Force, as well as the regionalist Northumbrian Association[3]
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Time
Time
Time
is the indefinite continued progress of existence and events that occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future.[1][2][3] Time
Time
is a component quantity of various measurements used to sequence events, to compare the duration of events or the
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Vanity Fair (UK Magazine)
The second Vanity Fair was a British weekly magazine published from 1868 to 1914.Contents1 History 2 Caricatures 3 Image gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Subtitled "A Weekly Show of Political, Social and Literary Wares", it was founded by Thomas Gibson Bowles, who aimed to expose the contemporary vanities of Victorian society. The first issue appeared in London on 7 November 1868. It offered its readership articles on fashion, current events, the theatre, books, social events and the latest scandals, together with serial fiction, word games and other trivia. Bowles wrote much of the magazine himself under various pseudonyms, such as "Jehu Junior", but contributors included Lewis Carroll, Arthur Hervey, Willie Wilde, P. G
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Felice Orsini
Felice Orsini
Felice Orsini
(Italian pronunciation: [feˈliːtʃe orˈsiːni]; 10 December 1819 – 13 March 1858) was an Italian revolutionary and leader of the Carbonari
Carbonari
who tried to assassinate Napoleon III, Emperor of the French.Contents1 Early life 2 Arrest and revolutionary activities 3 Assassination attempt on Louis Napoleon 4 Letter to Napoleon III 5 Judgment 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Felice Orsini
Felice Orsini
was born at Meldola
Meldola
in Romagna, then part of the Papal States. He was encouraged to become a priest, but he abandoned that lifestyle and became an ardent liberal, joining the Giovane Italia, a political society founded by Giuseppe Mazzini. Arrest and revolutionary activities[edit]1850s notice depicting OrsiniOrsini was arrested in 1844 along with his father, implicated in revolutionary plots and condemned to imprisonment for life
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Napoleon III
Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte (born Charles-Louis Napoléon Bonaparte; 20 April 1808 – 9 January 1873) was the President of France
President of France
from 1848 to 1852 and, as Napoleon
Napoleon
III, the Emperor of the French
Emperor of the French
from 1852 to 1870. He was the only president of the French Second Republic
French Second Republic
and the head of the Second French Empire. The nephew and heir of Napoleon
Napoleon
I, he was the first Head of State
Head of State
of France
France
to hold the title of President, the first elected by a direct popular vote, and the youngest until the election of Emmanuel Macron in 2017
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Wallington Hall
Wallington is a country house and gardens located about 12 miles (19 km) west of Morpeth, Northumberland, England, near the village of Cambo. It has been owned by the National Trust since 1942, after it was donated complete with the estate and farms by Sir Charles Philips Trevelyan, the first donation of its kind. It is a Grade I listed building.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External links 5 Further readingHistory[edit] The estate was owned by the Fenwick family from 1475 until their financial problems caused them to sell their properties to the Blacketts. The hall house was rebuilt in 1688 around the ancient pele tower house for Sir William Blackett and was later substantially rebuilt again, in Palladian style, for Sir Walter Blackett by architect Daniel Garret, before passing to the Trevelyan family in 1777
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Menton
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Menton
Menton
(French pronunciation: ​[mɑ̃tɔ̃]; Occitan: [meˈta], written Menton
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Grosvenor Place
Grosvenor Place
Grosvenor Place
is a street in London, running from Hyde Park Corner down the west side of Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace
gardens, and joining lower Grosvenor Place
Grosvenor Place
where there are some cafes and restaurants. It joins Grosvenor Gardens to the south, which links it to Victoria railway station. At No. 17 is the embassy of the Republic of Ireland. External links[edit] Grosvenor Place
Grosvenor Place
at londontown.com Irish embassy's websiteCoordinates: 51°30′02″N 0°08′59″W / 51.50066°N 0.14977°W / 51.50066; -0.14977This London
London
road or road transport-related article is a stub
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Catullus
Gaius Valerius Catullus
Catullus
(/kəˈtʌləs/, (Latin pronunciation: [kaˈtʊlːʊs]; c. 84 – 54? BC) was a Latin poet of the late Roman Republic
Roman Republic
who wrote chiefly in the neoteric style of poetry, which is about personal life rather than classical heroes. His surviving works are still read widely and continue to influence poetry and other forms of art. Catullus's poems were widely appreciated by other poets. He greatly influenced Ovid, Horace, Virgil, and others. After his rediscovery in the Late Middle Ages, Catullus
Catullus
again found admirers. The explicit sexual imagery which he uses in some of his poems has shocked many readers
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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French Riviera
The French Riviera (known in French as the Côte d'Azur French pronunciation: ​[kot daˈzyʁ]; Occitan: Còsta d'Azur pronounced [ˈkɔstɔ daˈzyɾ]; literal translation "Coast of Azure") is the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
coastline of the southeast corner of France. There is no official boundary, but it is usually considered to extend from Cassis
Cassis
or Toulon
Toulon
or Saint-Tropez
Saint-Tropez
on the west to the France-Italy border
France-Italy border
in the east, where the Italian Riviera joins.[1][2] The coast is entirely within the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (PACA) region of France. The principality of Monaco
Monaco
is a semi-enclave within the region, surrounded on three sides by France and fronting the Mediterranean. This coastline was one of the first modern resort areas
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Jesus
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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Death
Death
Death
is the cessation of all biological functions that sustain a living organism.[citation needed] Phenomena which commonly bring about death include aging, predation, malnutrition, disease, suicide, homicide, starvation, dehydration, and accidents or trauma resulting in terminal injury.[1] In most cases, bodies of living organisms begin to decompose shortly after death.[2] Death
Death
– particularly the death of humans – has commonly been considered a sad or unpleasant occasion, due to the affection for the being that has died and the termination of social and familial bonds with the deceased. Other concerns include fear of death, necrophobia, anxiety, sorrow, grief, emotional pain, depression, sympathy, compassion, solitude, or saudade
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Ocean
An ocean (from Ancient Greek Ὠκεανός, transc. Okeanós, the sea of classical antiquity[1]) is a body of saline water that composes much of a planet's hydrosphere.[2] On Earth, an ocean is one of the major conventional divisions of the World
World
Ocean
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