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Alfred Mond, 1st Baron Melchett
Alfred Moritz Mond, 1st Baron
Baron
Melchett, PC, FRS, DL (23 October 1868 – 27 December 1930), known as Sir Alfred Mond, Bt, between 1910 and 1928, was a British industrialist, financier and politician. In his later life he became an active Zionist.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Business career 3 Political career 4 Benefactions, Zionism
Zionism
and honours 5 Personal life 6 Publications 7 Literary references 8 Coat of arms 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Mond was born in Farnworth, Widnes, Lancashire, England, the younger son of Ludwig Mond, a chemist and industrialist who had emigrated from Germany, and his wife Frieda, née Löwenthal, both of Jewish extraction. He was educated at Cheltenham College
Cheltenham College
and St. John's College, Cambridge,[1] but failed his natural sciences tripos
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The Right Honourable
The Right Honourable (The Rt Hon. or Rt Hon.) is an honorific style traditionally applied to certain persons and to certain collective bodies in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, India, some other Commonwealth realms, the Anglophone Caribbean, Mauritius, and occasionally elsewhere
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Chester
Chester
Chester
(/ˈtʃɛstər/ CHEST-ər; Welsh: Caer
Caer
[ˈkai̯r]) is a walled city in Cheshire, England, on the River Dee, close to the border with Wales. With a population of 86,011 in 2011,[3] it is the most populous settlement of Cheshire
Cheshire
West and Chester, which had a population of 332,200 in 2014.[4] Chester
Chester
was granted city status in 1541. Chester
Chester
was founded as a "castrum" or Roman fort with the name Deva Victrix in the reign of the Emperor Vespasian
Emperor Vespasian
in 79 AD. One of the main army camps in Roman Britain, Deva later became a major civilian settlement. In 689, King Æthelred of Mercia
Æthelred of Mercia
founded the Minster Church of West Mercia, which later became Chester's first cathedral, and the Saxons extended and strengthened the walls to protect the city against the Danes
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Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council
Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians, who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords. The Privy Council formally advises the sovereign on the exercise of the Royal Prerogative, and corporately (as Queen-in-Council) it issues executive instruments known as Orders in Council, which among other powers enact Acts of Parliament. The Council also holds the delegated authority to issue Orders of Council, mostly used to regulate certain public institutions
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Bar Association
A bar association is a professional association of lawyers. Some bar associations are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession in their jurisdiction; others are professional organizations dedicated to serving their members; in many cases, they are both. In many Commonwealth jurisdictions, the bar association comprises lawyers who are qualified as barristers or advocates in particular, versus solicitors (see bar council). Membership in bar associations may be mandatory or optional for practicing attorneys, depending on jurisdiction.Contents1 Etymology 2 In Commonwealth jurisdictions2.1 Canada 2.2 India 2.3 Pakistan3 In the United States3.1 Mandatory, integrated, or unified bar associations 3.2 Voluntary bar associations 3.3 Judges4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] Main article: Bar (law) The use of the term bar to mean "the whole body of lawyers, the legal profession" comes ultimately from English custom
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Inner Temple
The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court
Inns of Court
(professional associations for barristers and judges) in London. To be called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, an individual must belong to one of these Inns. It is located in the wider Temple area of the capital, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London. The Inn is a professional body that provides legal training, selection, and regulation for members. It is ruled by a governing council called "Parliament", made up of the Masters of the Bench (or "Benchers"), and led by the Treasurer, who is elected to serve a one-year term. The Temple takes its name from the Knights Templar, who originally leased the land to the Temple's inhabitants (Templars) until their abolition in 1312
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Brunner Mond
Tata Chemicals
Tata Chemicals
Europe (formerly Brunner Mond (UK) Limited) is a UK-based chemicals company that is a subsidiary of Tata Chemicals Limited, itself a part of the India-based Tata Group. Its principal products are soda ash, sodium bicarbonate, calcium chloride and associated alkaline chemicals.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The original company was formed as a partnership in 1873 (becoming a limited company in 1881) by John Brunner and Ludwig Mond. They built Winnington
Winnington
Works in Northwich, Cheshire
Cheshire
and produced their first soda ash in 1874. In 1911 it acquired soap and fat manufacturer Joseph Crosfield and Sons and Gossage, another soap company that owned palm plantations
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Vale Inco
Vale Canada
Canada
Limited (formerly Vale Inco, CVRD Inco and Inco Limited; for corporate branding purposes simply known as "Vale" and pronounced /ˈvɑːleɪ/ in English)[1] is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Brazilian mining company Vale. Vale's nickel mining and metals division is headquartered in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It produces nickel, copper, cobalt, platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, gold, and silver. Prior to being purchased by CVRD (now Vale) in 2006, Inco was the world's second largest producer of nickel, and the third largest mining company outside South Africa and Russia of platinum group metals
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Natwest
National Westminster Bank, commonly known as NatWest, is a large retail and commercial bank in the United Kingdom. It was established in 1968 by the merger of National Provincial Bank
National Provincial Bank
(established 1833 as National Provincial Bank
National Provincial Bank
of England) and Westminster Bank
Westminster Bank
(established 1834 as London County and Westminster Bank). Since 2000 it has been part of the Royal Bank of Scotland
Scotland
Group. Following "ring-fencing" of the Group's core domestic business, the bank is a direct subsidiary of NatWest
NatWest
Holdings
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City Of Chester (UK Parliament Constituency)
In modern politics and history, a parliament is a legislative, elected body of government. Generally, a modern parliament has three functions: representing the electorate, making laws, and overseeing the government via hearings and inquiries. The term is similar to the idea of a senate, synod or congress, and is commonly used in countries that are current or former monarchies, a form of government with a monarch as the head. Some contexts restrict the use of the word parliament to parliamentary systems, although it is also used to describe the legislature in some presidential systems (e.g. the French parliament), even where it is not in the official name. Historically, parliaments included various kinds of deliberative, consultative, and judicial assemblies, e.g
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Great Budworth
Great Budworth
Great Budworth
is a civil parish and village, approximately four miles (6.4 km) north of Northwich, England, within the unitary authority of Cheshire
Cheshire
West and Chester
Chester
and the ceremonial county of Cheshire
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Landford
Landford
Landford
is a village and civil parish 10 miles (16 km) southeast of Salisbury
Salisbury
in Wiltshire, England. To the south and east of the parish is the county of Hampshire
Hampshire
and the New Forest
New Forest
National Park. The parish includes the small village of Nomansland and the hamlets of Hamptworth
Hamptworth
and Landfordwood. The River Blackwater crosses the parish from west to east, on its way to join the Test in Hampshire
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Jew
Jews
Jews
(Hebrew: יְהוּדִים‬ ISO 259-3 Yehudim, Israeli pronunciation [jehuˈdim]) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group[12] and a nation[13][14][15] originating from the Israelites,[16][17][18] or Hebrews,[19][20] of the Ancient Near East. Jewish ethnicity, nationhood, and religion are strongly interrelated,[21] as
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George III Of The United Kingdom
George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738[c] – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain
King of Great Britain
and King of Ireland
King of Ireland
from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland until his death. He was concurrently Duke and prince-elector of Brunswick- Lüneburg
Lüneburg
("Hanover") in the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
before becoming King of Hanover
King of Hanover
on 12 October 1814
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Punch (magazine)
Punch; or, The London
London
Charivari was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire established in 1841 by Henry Mayhew
Henry Mayhew
and engraver Ebenezer Landells. Historically, it was most influential in the 1840s and 1850s, when it helped to coin the term "cartoon" in its modern sense as a humorous illustration. After the 1940s, when its circulation peaked, it went into a long decline, closing in 1992. It was revived in 1996, but closed again in 2002.Contents1 History 2 Later years2.1 Punch table3 Gallery of selected early covers 4 Contributors4.1 Editors 4.2 Cartoonists 4.3 Authors5 Influence 6 See also 7 Notes 8 Works cited 9 External linksHistory[edit] Punch was founded on 17 July 1841 by Henry Mayhew
Henry Mayhew
and engraver Ebenezer Landells, on an initial investment of £25. It was jointly edited by Mayhew and Mark Lemon
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National Gallery, London
5,229,192 (2017)[1]Ranked 3rd nationally[1]Director Gabriele FinaldiPublic transit access Charing Cross Charing Cross Detailed information belowWebsite www.nationalgallery.org.ukThe National Gallery
National Gallery
is an art museum in Trafalgar Square
Trafalgar Square
in the City of Westminster, in Central London. Founded in 1824, it houses a collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900.[a] The Gallery is an exempt charity, and a non-departmental public body of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.[2] Its collection belongs to the government on behalf of the British public, and entry to the main collection is free of charge
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