HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Alfred De Vigny
Alfred Victor, Comte de Vigny (27 March 1797 – 17 September 1863) was a French poet and early leader of French Romanticism. He also produced novels, plays, and translations of Shakespeare. As an army officer with conservative and royalist views, Vigny differed sharply from most other French Romantics.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksBiography[edit] Vigny was born in Loches
Loches
(a town to which he never returned) into an aristocratic family. His father was a 60-year-old veteran of the Seven Years' War who died before Vigny's 20th birthday; his mother, 20 years younger, was a strong-willed woman who was inspired by Rousseau and took personal responsibility for Vigny's early education
[...More...]

"Alfred De Vigny" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Félix Nadar
Gaspard-Félix Tournachon (6 April 1820 – 20 March 1910[1]), known by the pseudonym Nadar, was a French photographer, caricaturist, journalist, novelist, and balloonist (or, more accurately, proponent of manned flight). Photographic portraits by Nadar are held by many of the great national collections of photographs.Contents1 Life 2 Works2.1 Gallery3 See also 4 Citations 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit]"Nadar élevant la Photographie à la hauteur de l'Art" (Nadar elevating Photography to Art). Lithograph by Honoré Daumier, appearing in Le Boulevard, May 25, 18631863: Disaster with "Le Géant" at Neustadt am Rübenberge at Hanover. Illustration in a newspaperNadar was born in April 1820 in Paris (though some sources state Lyon). His father, Victor Tournachon, was a printer and bookseller. After his father's death, Nadar decided to quit his medical studies for economic reasons
[...More...]

"Félix Nadar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Medieval French Literature
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Medieval French Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romeo And Juliet
Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet
Juliet
is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers. Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet
Juliet
belongs to a tradition of tragic romances stretching back to antiquity. The plot is based on an Italian tale translated into verse as The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet
The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet
by Arthur Brooke in 1562 and retold in prose in Palace of Pleasure
Palace of Pleasure
by William Painter in 1567
[...More...]

"Romeo And Juliet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Drama
Drama
Drama
is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance; a play performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.[1] Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics (c. 335 BC)—the earliest work of dramatic theory.[2] The term "drama" comes from a Greek word meaning "action" (Classical Greek: δρᾶμα, drama), which is derived from "I do" (Classical Greek: δράω, drao). The two masks associated with drama represent the traditional generic division between comedy and tragedy. They are symbols of the ancient Greek Muses, Thalia, and Melpomene
[...More...]

"Drama" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Louis Xiii Of France
Louis XIII (French pronunciation: ​[lwi tʁɛz]; 27 September 1601 – 14 May 1643) was a monarch of the House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
who ruled as King of France
King of France
from 1610 to 1643 and King of Navarre
King of Navarre
(as Louis II) from 1610 to 1620, when the crown of Navarre was merged with the French crown. Shortly before his ninth birthday, Louis became king of France
France
and Navarre after his father Henry IV was assassinated. His mother, Marie de' Medici, acted as regent during his minority
[...More...]

"Louis Xiii Of France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles Augustin Sainte-Beuve
Charles Augustin Sainte-Beuve
Charles Augustin Sainte-Beuve
(French: [sɛ̃t bœv]; 23 December 1804, in Boulogne-sur-Mer
Boulogne-sur-Mer
– 13 October 1869, in Paris) was a literary critic of French literature.Contents1 Personal and public life1.1 Early years 1.2 Career1.2.1 Port-Royal2 Reception 3 Publications 4 References 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksPersonal and public life[edit] Early years[edit] He was born in Boulogne, educated there, and studied medicine at the Collège Charlemagne
Collège Charlemagne
in Paris (1824–27). In 1828, he served in the St Louis Hospital
[...More...]

"Charles Augustin Sainte-Beuve" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Académie Française
The Académie française
Académie française
(French pronunciation: ​[akademi fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is the pre-eminent French council for matters pertaining to the French language. The Académie was officially established in 1635 by Cardinal Richelieu, the chief minister to King Louis XIII.[1] Suppressed in 1793 during the French Revolution, it was restored as a division of the Institut de France
France
in 1803 by Napoleon
Napoleon
Bonaparte.[1] It is the oldest of the five académies of the institute. The Académie consists of forty members, known informally as les immortels (the immortals).[2] New members are elected by the members of the Académie itself. Academicians hold office for life, but they may resign or be dismissed for misconduct
[...More...]

"Académie Française" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
[...More...]

"Buddhism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

French Renaissance Literature
French and Francophone literatureFrench literature By category French languageFrench literary historyMedieval 16th century • 17th century 18th century • 19th century 20th century • ContemporaryFrancophone literatureFrancophone literature Literature of Quebec Postcolonial literature Literature of HaitiFrench-language authorsChronological listFrench writersWriters • Novelists Playwrights • Poets Essayists Short story
Short story
writersFormsNovel • Poetry • PlaysGenresScience fiction • Comics FantastiqueMovementsNaturalism • Sy
[...More...]

"French Renaissance Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royalist
A royalist supports a particular monarch as head of state for a particular kingdom, or of a particular dynastic claim. In the abstract, this position is royalism. It is distinct from monarchism, which advocates a monarchical system of government, but not necessarily a particular monarch. Most often, the term royalist is applied to a supporter of a current regime or one that has been recently overthrown to form a republic. In the United Kingdom, today the term is almost indistinguishable from "monarchist" because there are no significant rival claimants to the throne
[...More...]

"Royalist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

17th-century French Literature
French and Francophone literatureFrench literature By category French languageFrench literary historyMedieval 16th century • 17th century 18th century • 19th century 20th century • ContemporaryFrancophone literatureFrancophone literature Literature of Quebec Postcolonial literature Literature of HaitiFrench-language authorsChronological listFrench writersWriters • Novelists Playwrights • Poets Essayists Short story writersFormsNovel • Poetry • PlaysGenresScience fiction • Comics FantastiqueMovementsNaturalism • Symbolism Surrealism
[...More...]

"17th-century French Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

18th-century French Literature
French and Francophone literatureFrench literature By category French languageFrench literary historyMedieval 16th century • 17th century 18th century • 19th century 20th century • ContemporaryFrancophone literatureFrancophone literature Literature of Quebec Postcolonial literature Literature of HaitiFrench-language authorsChronological listFrench writersWriters • Novelists Playwrights • Poets Essayists Short story writersFormsNovel • Poetry • PlaysGenresScience fiction • Comics FantastiqueMovementsNaturalism • Symbolism Surrealism
[...More...]

"18th-century French Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

20th-century French Literature
French and Francophone literatureFrench literature By category French languageFrench literary historyMedieval 16th century • 17th century 18th century • 19th century 20th century • ContemporaryFrancophone literatureFrancophone literature Literature of Quebec Postcolonial literature Literature of HaitiFrench-language authorsChronological listFrench writersWriters • Novelists Playwrights • Poets Essayists Short story writersFormsNovel • Poetry • PlaysGenresScience fiction • Comics FantastiqueMovementsNaturalism • Symbolism Surrealism
[...More...]

"20th-century French Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Contemporary French Literature
French and Francophone literatureFrench literature By category French languageFrench literary historyMedieval 16th century • 17th century 18th century • 19th century 20th century • ContemporaryFrancophone literatureFrancophone literature Literature of Quebec Postcolonial literature Literature of HaitiFrench-language authorsChronological listFrench writersWriters • Novelists Playwrights • Poets Essayists Short story writersFormsNovel • Poetry • PlaysGenresScience fiction • Comics FantastiqueMovementsNaturalism • Symbolism Surrealism
[...More...]

"Contemporary French Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Merchant Of Venice
The Merchant of Venice
Venice
is a 16th-century play by William Shakespeare in which a merchant in Venice
Venice
must default on a large loan provided by a Jewish moneylender. It is believed to have been written between 1596 and 1599. Though classified as a comedy in the First Folio
First Folio
and sharing certain aspects with Shakespeare's other romantic comedies, the play is most remembered for its dramatic scenes, and it is best known for Shylock
Shylock
and the famous "Hath not a Jew eyes?" speech on humanity. Also notable is Portia's speech about "the quality of mercy"
[...More...]

"The Merchant Of Venice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.