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Alexander Walters
Bishop ALEXANDER WALTERS (August 1, 1858 – February 2, 1917) was an American clergyman and noted civil rights leader. Born a slave in Bardstown, Kentucky , just before the Civil War, he rose to become a bishop in the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church at the age of 33, then president of the National Afro-American Council , the nation's largest civil rights organization, at the age of 40, serving in that post for most of the next decade. CONTENTS* 1 Biography * 1.1 National Afro-American Council * 1.2 Later life * 2 Private life * 3 References * 4 External links BIOGRAPHYWalters was born August 1, 1858 in Bardstown, Kentucky the oldest son of Henry and Harriet Walters. He was educated at a private school taught by a number of teachers. In 1871 he moved to Louisville, Kentucky where he worked as a waiter in private homes, hotels, and on steamboats
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National Association For The Advancement Of Colored People
The NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE (NAACP) is a civil rights organization in the United States, formed in 1909 as a bi-racial organization to advance justice for African Americans by W. E. B. Du Bois , Mary White Ovington and Moorfield Storey . Its mission in the 21st century is "to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred and racial discrimination." Their national initiatives included political lobbying, publicity efforts, and litigation strategies developed by their legal team. The group enlarged its mission in the late 20th century by considering issues such as police misconduct, the status of black foreign refugees, and questions of economic development. Its name, retained in accordance with tradition, uses the once common term colored people , referring to people of some African ancestry
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National Urban League
The NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE (NUL), formerly known as the NATIONAL LEAGUE ON URBAN CONDITIONS AMONG NEGROES, is a nonpartisan civil rights organization based in New York City that advocates on behalf of African Americans and against racial discrimination in the United States . It is the oldest and largest community-based organization of its kind in the nation. Its current President is Marc Morial . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Current status * 3 Presidents * 4 Gallery * 5 Publications * 6 See also * 7 Footnotes * 8 Further reading * 9 External links * 9.1 Archives HISTORYThe Committee on Urban Conditions Among Negroes was founded in New York City on September 29, 1910 by Ruth Standish Baldwin and Dr. George Edmund Haynes , among others
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Woodrow Wilson
PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES * Presidency -------------------------FIRST TERM * 1912 campaign * Election * 1st Inauguration * Women\'s suffrage * Suffrage parade * The New Freedom * Silent Sentinels * Federal Reserve Act *
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Liberia
Coordinates : 6°30′N 9°30′W / 6.500°N 9.500°W / 6.500; -9.500 Republic of Liberia Flag Coat of arms MOTTO: "The love of liberty brought us here" ANTHEM: All Hail, Liberia, Hail! Location of Liberia
Liberia
(dark blue) – in
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William Jennings Bryan
WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American orator and politician from Nebraska, and a dominant force in the populist wing of the Democratic Party , standing three times as the Party's nominee for President of the United States
President of the United States
(1896 , 1900 , and 1908 ). He served two terms as a member of the United States House of Representatives from Nebraska
Nebraska
and was United States Secretary of State under President Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
(1913–1915). He resigned because of his pacifist position on World War I
World War I
. Bryan was a devout Presbyterian
Presbyterian
, a strong advocate of popular democracy , and an enemy of the banks and the gold standard . He demanded " Free Silver " because he believed it undermined the evil "Money Power" and put more cash in the hands of the common people
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Bardstown, Kentucky
BARDSTOWN is a home rule-class city in Nelson County , Kentucky
Kentucky
, in the United States
United States
. The population was recorded as 11,700 by the 2010 census . It is the county seat of Nelson County. It is named for the pioneering Bard brothers. David Bard obtained a 1,000 acres (400 ha) land grant in 1785 in what was then Jefferson County, Virginia from Governor Patrick Henry
Patrick Henry
. William Bard surveyed and platted the town. It was originally chartered as BAIRD\'S TOWN. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Geography * 3 Climate * 4 Demographics * 4.1 2010 * 4.2 2000 * 5 Transportation * 6 Attractions and events * 7 Education * 8 Notable people * 9 In popular culture * 10 See also * 11 References * 12 External links HISTORY See also: Bardstown Historical Museum St
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Booker T. Washington
BOOKER TALIAFERRO WASHINGTON (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author, orator, and advisor to presidents of the United States. Between 1890 and 1915, Washington was the dominant leader in the African-American community. Washington was from the last generation of black American leaders born into slavery and became the leading voice of the former slaves and their descendants. They were newly oppressed in the South by disenfranchisement and the Jim Crow discriminatory laws enacted in the post-Reconstruction Southern states in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Washington was a key proponent of African-American businesses and one of the founders of the National Negro Business League . His base was the Tuskegee Institute , a historically black college in Alabama
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Detroit
DETROIT (/dɪˈtrɔɪt/ ) is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan
Michigan
, the largest city on the United States–Canada border , and the seat of Wayne County . The municipality of Detroit had a 2016 estimated population of 672,795, making it the 23rd-most populous city in the United States. The metropolitan area , known as Metro Detroit , is home to 4.3 million people, making it the second-largest in the Midwest
Midwest
after Chicago
Chicago
. Detroit
Detroit
is a major port on the Detroit River , one of the four major straits that connect the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
system to the Saint Lawrence Seaway . The Detroit Metropolitan Airport
Detroit Metropolitan Airport
is among the most important hubs in the United States
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Baltimore
BALTIMORE (/ˈbɔːltᵻˌmɔːr/ , locally: ) is the largest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland
Maryland
, and the 29th-most populous city in the country. It was established by the Constitution of Maryland
Maryland
and is not part of any county; thus, it is the largest independent city in the United States, with a population of 621,849 as of 2015. As of 2016, the population of the Baltimore metropolitan area
Baltimore metropolitan area
was estimated to be just under 2.8 million, making it the 21st largest metropolitan area in the country. Founded in 1729, Baltimore
Baltimore
is the second-largest seaport in the Mid-Atlantic . Baltimore's Inner Harbor
Inner Harbor
was once the second leading port of entry for immigrants to the United States
United States
and a major manufacturing center
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Immigration And Naturalization Service
The UNITED STATES IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE (INS) was an agency of the U.S. Department of Justice from 1933 to 2003. Referred to by some as FORMER INS and by others as LEGACY INS, the agency ceased to exist under that name on March 1, 2003, when most of its functions were transferred to three new entities – U.S. Citizenship and Immigration
Immigration
Services (USCIS), U.S. Immigration
Immigration
and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) – within the newly created Department of Homeland Security , as part of a major government reorganization following the September 11 attacks of 2001. Prior to 1933, there were separate offices administering immigration and naturalization matters. The INS was established on June 10, 1933, merging these previously separate areas of administration
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Ellis Island
ELLIS ISLAND, in Upper New York Bay , was the gateway for over 12 million immigrants to the United States
United States
as the nation's busiest immigrant inspection station for over sixty years from 1892 until 1954. The island was greatly expanded with land reclamation between 1892 and 1934. Before that, the much smaller original island was the site of Fort Gibson and later a naval magazine . The island was made part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument in 1965, and has hosted a museum of immigration since 1990. Long considered part of New York state
New York state
, a 1998 United States
United States
Supreme Court decision found that most of the island is in New Jersey
New Jersey

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Brooklyn
Coordinates : 40°41′34″N 73°59′25″W / 40.69278°N 73.99028°W / 40.69278; -73.99028 Brooklyn Kings County
County
Borough of New York City
New York City
and
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Cypress Hill Cemetery
CYPRESS HILLS CEMETERY was the first non-sectarian/non-denominational cemetery corporation organized in the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens in New York City . The Cemetery is run as a non-for-profit organization and is located at 833 Jamaica Avenue in Brooklyn. The Cemetery occupies both boroughs, and its 225 acres are divided by the Jackie Robinson Parkway . Cypress Hills Cemetery retains its two primary entrances at Jamaica Avenue (Cypress Hills, Brooklyn ) and Cooper Avenue (Glendale, Queens ). CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Features * 3 Notable interments * 4 In popular culture * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links HISTORYEstablished in 1848 east of the Ridgewood Reservoir , Cypress Hills Cemetery was opened for burials in 1851 and was designed to emulate a "rural cemetery" setting. A section of the cemetery was designated as the Cypress Hills National Cemetery in 1862 as a military burial ground for soldiers of the American Civil War
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Wayback Machine
The WAYBACK MACHINE is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet Archive
Internet Archive
, a nonprofit organization , based in San Francisco
San Francisco
, California
California
, United States . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Technical details * 2.1 Storage capabilities * 2.2 Growth * 2.3 Website exclusion policy * 2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy * 3 Uses * 3.1 In legal evidence * 3.1.1 Civil litigation * 3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. * 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska
Telewizja Polska
* 3.1.2 Patent law * 3.1.3 Limitations of utility * 4 Legal status * 5 Archived content legal issues * 5.1 Scientology
Scientology
* 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc
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Methodist
METHODISM or the METHODIST MOVEMENT is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley
John Wesley
. George Whitefield and John's brother Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley
were also significant leaders in the movement. It originated as a revival within the 18th century Church of England
Church of England
and became a separate denomination after Wesley's death. The movement spread throughout the British Empire
British Empire
, the United States, and beyond because of vigorous missionary work , today claiming approximately 80 million adherents worldwide. Wesley\'s theology focused on sanctification and the effect of faith on the character of a Christian
Christian

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