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Alexander Obukhov
Alexander Mikhailovich Obukhov (Russian: Алекса́ндр Миха́йлович Обу́хов) (5 May 1918 – 3 December 1989) was a Russian physicist and applied mathematician known for his contributions to statistical theory of turbulence and atmospheric physics. He was one of the founders of modern boundary layer meteorology.[1] He served as the Head of the theoretical department at Sternberg Astronomical Institute, a division of Moscow
Moscow
State University.[2] Obukhov’s 1946 fundamental paper on a universal length scale for exchange processes in the surface layer was the basis for the derivation of the Monin–Obukhov similarity theory in 1954.[3][4] The Monin–Obukhov similarity theory and the Monin–Obukhov Length are named after him and Russian Academician Andrei Monin.[5] Early life and education[edit] Obukhov was born on 5 May 1918 in Saratov, a city situated in the Volga's drainage basin
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Saratov
Saratov
Saratov
(Russian: Сара́тов, IPA: [sɐˈratəf] ( listen)) is a city and the administrative center of Saratov
Saratov
Oblast, Russia, and a major port on the Volga River
Volga River
located upstream (north) of Volgograd. Population: 837,900 (2010 Census);[10] 873,055 (2002 Census);[15] 904,643 (1989 Census).[16]Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 German community3 Administrative and municipal status 4 Geography4.1 Climate5 Economy and infrastructure5.1 Transportation6 Education 7 Culture 8 Demographics 9 Sports 10 Twin towns and sister cities 11 Notable people 12 References12.1 Notes 12.2 Sources13 External linksEtymology[edit] The name Saratov
Saratov
may be derived from the Turkic words Saryk Atov, which mean "hawks' island"
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Sternberg Astronomical Institute
The Sternberg Astronomical Institute
Sternberg Astronomical Institute
(Государственный астрономический институт имени Штернберга in Russian), also known as GAISh
GAISh
(ГАИШ), is a research institution in Moscow, Russia, a division of Moscow
Moscow
State University. The institute is named after astronomer Pavel Karlovich Shternberg. It was founded in 1931, on the site of the observatory established by the university in 1831.[1] The main-belt asteroid 14789 GAISH, discovered by Lyudmila Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory
Crimean Astrophysical Observatory
in 1969, was named in its honour.[1] The official naming citation was published on 6 January 2007 (M.P.C. 58595).[2] References[edit]^ a b " 14789 GAISH (1969 TY1)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 29 May 2017.  ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive"
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Mathematics Genealogy Project
The Mathematics
Mathematics
Genealogy Project is a web-based database for the academic genealogy of mathematicians.[1][2][3] By 3 January 2018, it contained information on 222,193 mathematical scientists who contributed to research-level mathematics
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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K.R. Sreenivasan
Katepalli R. Sreenivasan is an engineer whose research includes physics and applied mathematics. He studies turbulence, nonlinear and statistical physics, astrophysical fluid mechanics, and cryogenic helium.[2][3] He is the dean of engineering and executive vice provost for science and technology of New York University. Sreenivasan is also the Eugene Kleiner Professor for Innovation in Mechanical Engineering at New York University Tandon School of Engineering, and a professor of physics and mathematics professor at the New York University Graduate School of Arts and Science and Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences.[4][5][6][7]Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Other activities 4 Selected publications 5 ReferencesEducation[edit] Sreenivasan earned his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from University Visvesvaraya College of Engineering (UVCE), Bangalore University in 1968
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Cambridge University Press
Cambridge
Cambridge
University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Granted letters patent by King Henry VIII in 1534, it is the world's oldest publishing house and the second-largest university press in the world (after Oxford University Press).[2][3] It also holds letters patent as the Queen's Printer.[4] The press's mission is "To further the University's mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence."[5] Cambridge
Cambridge
University Press is a department of the University of Cambridge
Cambridge
and is both an academic and educational publisher. With a global sales presence, publishing hubs, and offices in more than 40 countries, it publishes over 50,000 titles by authors from over 100 countries
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Rashid Sunyaev
Rashid Alievich Sunyaev (Tatar: Cyrillic
Cyrillic
Рәшит Гали улы Сөнәев, Latin Räşit Ğali ulı Sönäyef, Cyrillic: Раши́д Али́евич Сюня́ев; born March 1, 1943 in Tashkent, USSR) is a Soviet and Russian astrophysicist of Tatar descent. He was educated at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MS). He became a professor at MIPT in 1974. Sunyaev was the head of the High Energy
Energy
Astrophysics
Astrophysics
Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and has been chief scientist of the Academy's Space Research Institute since 1992. He has also been a director of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching, Germany
Germany
since 1996.Contents1 Works 2 Honors and awards 3 Literature 4 References 5 External linksWorks[edit] Sunyaev and Yakov B. Zel'dovich
Yakov B

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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Bibcode
The bibcode (also known as the refcode) is a compact identifier used by several astronomical data systems to uniquely specify literature references.Contents1 Adoption 2 Format 3 Examples 4 See also 5 ReferencesAdoption[edit] The Bibliographic Reference Code (refcode) was originally developed to be used in SIMBAD
SIMBAD
and the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database
NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database
(NED), but it became a de facto standard and is now used more widely, for example, by the NASA Astrophysics Data System
Astrophysics Data System
who coined and prefer the term "bibcode".[1][2] Format[edit] The code has a fixed length of 19 characters and has the form YYYYJJJJJVVVVMPPPPA where YYYY is the four-digit year of the reference and JJJJJ is a code indicating where the reference was published
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Drainage Basin
A drainage basin is any area of land where precipitation collects and drains off into a common outlet, such as into a river, bay, or other body of water
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Volga River
The Volga (Russian: Во́лга, IPA: [ˈvoɫɡə] ( listen)) is the longest river in Europe. It is also Europe's largest river in terms of discharge and watershed. The river flows through central Russia
Russia
and into the Caspian Sea, and is widely regarded as the national river of Russia. Eleven of the twenty largest cities of Russia, including the capital, Moscow, are located in the Volga's watershed. Some of the largest reservoirs in the world can be found along the Volga
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Moscow State University
Lomonosov Moscow
Moscow
State University
University
(MSU; Russian: Московский государственный университет имени М. В. Ломоносова, often abbreviated МГУ) is a coeducational and public research university located in Moscow, Russia. It was founded on January 25, 1755 by Mikhail Lomonosov. MSU was renamed after Lomonosov in 1940 and was then known as Lomonosov University. It also houses the tallest educational building in the world.[2] Its current rector is Viktor Sadovnichiy
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Atmospheric Physics
Atmospheric physics Atmospheric dynamics (category) Atmospheric chemistry
Atmospheric chemistry
(category)Meteorology Weather
Weather
(category) · (portal) Tropical cyclone
Tropical cyclone
(category)Climatology Climate
Climate
(category) Climate
Climate
change (category) Global warming
Global warming
(category) · (portal)v t e Atmospheric physics
Atmospheric physics
is the application of physics to the study of the atmosphere. Atmospheric physicists attempt to model Earth's atmosphere and the atmospheres of the other planets using fluid flow equations, chemical models, radiation budget, and energy transfer processes in the atmosphere (as well as how these tie into other systems such as the oceans)
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