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Alexander II Of Scotland
Alexander II (Mediaeval Gaelic: Alaxandair mac Uilliam; Modern Gaelic: Alasdair mac Uilleim; 24 August 1198 – 6 July 1249) was King of Scots from 1214 until his death in 1249.Contents1 Early life 2 King of Scots 3 Death 4 Wives 5 Fictional portrayals 6 Ancestry 7 References 8 Further readingEarly life[edit] He was born at Haddington, East Lothian, the only son of the Scottish king William the Lion
William the Lion
and Ermengarde of Beaumont
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Haakon IV Of Norway
Indigenous status:Sami[3]Minority status:[4]Jewish Traveller Forest Finn Romani KvenReligion LutheranDemonym Norwegian (Nordmann)Government Unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy• MonarchHarald V• Prime MinisterErna Solberg• President of the StortingTone W. Trøen• Chief JusticeToril Marie ØieLegislature StortingHistory• State established prior unification872• Norwegian Empire (Greatest indep
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Scandinavian Scotland
Scandinavian Scotland
Scotland
refers to the period from the 8th to the 15th centuries during which Vikings
Vikings
and Norse settlers, mainly Norwegians and to a lesser extent other Scandinavians, and their descendents colonised parts of what is now the peri
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Argyll
Argyll (/ɑːrˈɡaɪl/) (archaically Argyle, Earra-Ghàidheal in modern Gaelic pronounced [ˈaːr̴əɣɛː.əɫ̪]), sometimes anglicised as Argyllshire, is a historic county and registration county of western Scotland. Argyll is of ancient origin, and corresponds to most of the part of the ancient kingdom of Dál Riata on Great Britain. Argyll was also a medieval bishopric with its cathedral at Lismore, as well as an early modern earldom and dukedom, the Dukedom of Argyll. It borders Inverness-shire to the north, Perthshire and Dunbartonshire to the east, and —separated by the Firth of Clyde— neighbours Renfrewshire and Ayrshire to the south-east, and Buteshire to the south. Between 1890 and 1975, Argyll was an administrative county with a county council
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Craignish
Craignish (Scottish Gaelic, Creiginis) is a peninsula in Argyll, on the west coast of Scotland. It lies around 25 miles (40 km) south of Oban, and 10 miles (16 km) north-west of Lochgilphead. The peninsula is around 5.5 miles (8.9 km) long, and is aligned along a north-east to south-west orientation, in common with much of the landform of coastal Argyll. To the south is Loch Craignish, which contains several small islands. To the north are the Slate Islands, with the island of Shuna closest. Jura is only 3 miles (4.8 km) west of Craignish Point, the southern tip of Craignish. There are two main settlements on Craignish, Ardfern
Ardfern
on the south coast, and the modern village of Craobh Haven, established in 1983 as a holiday resort and marina, on the north
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Ardscotnish
Ardscotnish, also known as Ardskeodnish, is a former location, in Argyll and Bute, Scotland approximating to the present parish of Kilmartin.This Argyll and Bute location article is a stub
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River Add
The River Add (Scottish Gaelic: Abhainn Àd) is a river which runs through Argyll and Bute on the West of Scotland. Historically, it was known as the Airigh, but to avoid confusion with the Aray (which gives its name to Inveraray), it was renamed the Add[when?]. The surrounding valley still retains the name Glen Airigh, and river gave rise to the name Glassary (Glas Airigh), by which the surrounding district of Glassary is known. In turn, this forms the second part of the name of Kilmichael Glassary, a village in the lower parts of the valley. Kilmichael Glassary is the home village of the founder of the Campbells of Auchinbreck, a senior cadet branch of Clan Campbell. The 1500ft high Marylyn of Beinn Dubh Airigh is situated on the northern edge Glen Airigh, separating it from Glen Awe. The river begins at Loch Sidheannach, which is fed from the nearby hills, including Loch nan Losgann, close to the peak of Beinn Dubh Airigh
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River Aray
This list of rivers in Scotland is organised geographically, taken anti-clockwise, from Berwick-upon-Tweed. Tributaries are listed down the page in an upstream direction. (L) indicates a left-bank tributary and (R) indicates a right-bank tributary whilst (Ls) and (Rs) indicate left and right forks where a named river is formed from two differently named rivers. For simplicity, they are divided here by the coastal section in which the mouth of the river can be found. Those on Scottish islands can be found in a section at the end. For Scottish estuaries, please see under firths and sea lochs. The Scots have many words for watercourses.A "Water" (Lallans: "Watter", Scots Gaelic, "Uisge") is a smaller river, e.g. Ugie Water, Water of Leith etc
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Cowal
Cowal
Cowal
(Scottish Gaelic: Còmhghall) is a peninsula in Argyll
Argyll
and Bute, in the west of Scotland, that extends into the Firth of Clyde. The northern part of the peninsula is covered by the Argyll
Argyll
Forest Park managed by Forestry Commission Scotland.[5] The Arrochar Alps[6] and Ardgoil peninsula in the north fringe the edges of the sea lochs whilst the forest park spreads out across the hillsides and mountain passes, making Cowal
Cowal
one of the remotest areas in the west of mainland Scotland
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Kintyre
Kintyre
Kintyre
(Scottish Gaelic: Cinn Tìre, Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [kʲʰiɲˈtʲʰiːɾʲə]) is a peninsula in western Scotland, in the southwest of Argyll
Argyll
and Bute. The peninsula stretches about 30 miles (48 km), from the Mull of Kintyre
Mull of Kintyre
in the south to East Loch Tarbert in the north. The area immediately north of Kintyre
Kintyre
is known as Knapdale. Kintyre
Kintyre
is long and narrow, at no point more than 11 miles (18 km) from west coast to east coast. The east side of the Kintyre
Kintyre
Peninsula
Peninsula
is bounded by Kilbrannan Sound, with a number of coastal peaks such as Torr Mor. The central spine of the peninsula is mostly hilly moorland. The coastal areas and hinterland, however, are rich and fertile
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Knapdale
Knapdale
Knapdale
(Scottish Gaelic: Cnapadal) forms a rural district of Argyll and Bute in the Scottish Highlands, adjoining Kintyre
Kintyre
to the south, and divided from the rest of Argyll
Argyll
to the north by the Crinan Canal. It includes two parishes, North Knapdale
Knapdale
and South Knapdale
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Galloway
Galloway (Scottish Gaelic: Gall-Ghàidhealaibh, Latin: Gallovidia)[1] is a region in southwestern Scotland comprising the historic counties of Wigtownshire and Kirkcudbrightshire. A native or inhabitant of Galloway is called a Gallovidian[2][3] or a Galwegian.[4] The place name Galloway is derived from the Gaelic i nGall Gaidhealaib ("amongst the Gall Gaidheil").[5] The Gall Gaidheil, literally meaning "Stranger-Gaidheil", originally referred to a population of mixed Scandinavian and Gaelic ethnicity that inhabited Galloway in the Middle Ages. Galloway is bounded by sea to the west and south, the Galloway Hills to the north, and the River Nith to the east; the border between Kirkcudbright and Wigtown shires is marked by the River Cree
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Dover
Dover
Dover
(/ˈdoʊvər/) is a town and major ferry port in the home county of Kent, in South East England. It faces France
France
across the Strait of Dover, the narrowest part of the English Channel, and lies south-east of Canterbury
Canterbury
and east of Maidstone. The town is the administrative centre of the Dover District
Dover District
and home of the Dover
Dover
Calais
Calais
ferry through the Port
Port
of Dover. The surrounding chalk cliffs are known as the White Cliffs of Dover. Archaeological
Archaeological
finds have revealed that the area has always been a focus for peoples entering and leaving Britain
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Newcastle Upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
(RP: /ˌnjuːkɑːsəl əpɒn ˈtaɪn/ ( listen);[4] locally: /njuːˌkæsəl əpən ˈtaɪn/ ( listen)),[4] commonly known as Newcastle, is a city in Tyne and Wear, North East England, 103 miles (166 km) south of Edinburgh
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Western Isles
The Outer Hebrides
Hebrides
(/ˈhɛbrɪdiːz/), also known as the Western Isles (Scottish Gaelic: Na h-Eileanan Siar [nə ˈhelanən ˈʃiəɾ] or Na h-Eileanan an Iar [nəˈhelanən əˈɲiəɾ]), Innse Gall ("islands of the strangers") or the Long Isle or the Long Island (Scottish Gaelic: An t-Eilean Fada), is an island chain off the west coast of mainland Scotland.[Note 1] The islands are geographically coextensive with Comhairle nan Eilean Siar, one of the 32 unitary council areas of Scotland. They form part of the Hebrides, separated from the Scottish mainland and from the Inner Hebrides
Hebrides
by the waters of the Minch, the Little Minch
Minch
and the Sea of the Hebrides
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Hebrides
The Hebrides
Hebrides
(/ˈhɛbrɪdiːz/; Scottish Gaelic: Innse Gall, pronounced [ĩːʃə gau̯l̪ˠ]; Old Norse: Suðreyjar) compose a widespread and diverse archipelago off the west coast of mainland Scotland. There are two main groups: the Inner and Outer Hebrides. These islands have a long history of occupation dating back to the Mesolithic, and the culture of the residents has been affected by the successive influences of Celtic, Norse, and English-speaking peoples. This diversity is reflected in the names given to the islands, which are derived from the languages that have been spoken there in historic and perhaps prehistoric times. The Hebrides
Hebrides
are the source of much of Scottish Gaelic literature
Scottish Gaelic literature
and Gaelic music
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