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Album
An ALBUM is a collection of audio recordings issued as a single item on CD , record , audio tape or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century, first as books of individual 78rpm records , then from 1948 as vinyl LP records played at  33 1⁄3 rpm . Vinyl LPs are still issued, though in the 21st-century album sales have mostly focused on compact disc (CD) and MP3 formats. The audio cassette was a format used from the late 1970s through to the 1990s alongside vinyl. An album may be recorded in a recording studio (fixed or mobile), in a concert venue, at home, in the field, or a mix of places. The time frame for completely recording an album varies between a few hours to several years. This process usually requires several takes with different parts recorded separately, and then brought or "mixed " together. Recordings that are done in one take without overdubbing are termed "live", even when done in a studio
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Album (other)
An ALBUM is a collection of recordings. ALBUM may also refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Album
Album
(Dave Pike Set album) * Album
Album
(Girls album) * Album
Album
(Joan Jett album) * Album
Album
(Public Image Ltd
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Revolutions Per Minute
REVOLUTIONS PER MINUTE (abbreviated RPM, RPM, REV/MIN, R/MIN) is a measure of the frequency of rotation , specifically the number of rotations around a fixed axis in one minute . It is used as a measure of rotational speed of a mechanical component. In the French language , TR/MIN (tours par minute) is the common abbreviation. The German language uses the abbreviation U/MIN or U/MIN (Umdrehungen pro Minute). CONTENTS * 1 International System of Units * 2 Examples * 3 See also * 4 References INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM OF UNITSAccording to the International System of Units (SI), rpm is not a unit. This is because the word revolution is a semantic annotation rather than a unit. The annotation is instead done as a subscript of the formula sign if needed. Because of the measured physical quantity , the formula sign has to be f for (rotational) frequency and ω or Ω for angular velocity . The corresponding basic SI derived unit is s−1 or Hz
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Cd
COMPACT DISC (CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format released in 1982 and co-developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
. The format was originally developed to store and play only sound recordings but was later adapted for storage of data ( CD-ROM
CD-ROM
). Several other formats were further derived from these, including write-once audio and data storage ( CD-R
CD-R
), rewritable media ( CD-RW
CD-RW
), Video Compact Disc
Compact Disc
( VCD
VCD
), Super Video Compact Disc
Compact Disc
(S VCD
VCD
), Photo CD
Photo CD
, PictureCD, CD-i , and Enhanced Music CD
Enhanced Music CD

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Gramophone Record
A GRAMOPHONE RECORD (PHONOGRAPH RECORD in the US), commonly known as a VINYL RECORD or simply VINYL or RECORD, is an analog sound storage medium in the form of a flat polyvinyl chloride (previously shellac ) disc with an inscribed, modulated spiral groove. The groove usually starts near the periphery and ends near the center of the disc. The phonograph disc record was the primary medium used for music reproduction until late in the 20th century. It had co-existed with the phonograph cylinder from the late 1880s and replaced it by the late 1920s. Records retained the largest market share even when new formats such as compact cassette were mass-marketed
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Audio Tape
An audio TAPE RECORDER, TAPE DECK or TAPE MACHINE is an analog audio storage device that records and plays back sounds, including articulated voices, usually using magnetic tape , either wound on a reel or in a cassette , for storage. In its present-day form, it records a fluctuating signal by moving the tape across a tape head that polarizes the magnetic domains in the tape in proportion to the audio signal. Tape-recording devices include reel-to-reel tape deck and the cassette deck . The use of magnetic tape for sound recording originated around 1930. Magnetizable tape revolutionized both the radio broadcast and music recording industries. It gave artists and producers the power to record and re-record audio with minimal loss in quality as well as edit and rearrange recordings with ease. The alternative recording technologies of the era, transcription discs and wire recorders , could not provide anywhere near this level of quality and functionality
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78rpm Record
A GRAMOPHONE RECORD (PHONOGRAPH RECORD in the US), commonly known as a VINYL RECORD or simply VINYL or RECORD, is an analog sound storage medium in the form of a flat polyvinyl chloride (previously shellac ) disc with an inscribed, modulated spiral groove. The groove usually starts near the periphery and ends near the center of the disc. The phonograph disc record was the primary medium used for music reproduction until late in the 20th century. It had co-existed with the phonograph cylinder from the late 1880s and replaced it by the late 1920s. Records retained the largest market share even when new formats such as compact cassette were mass-marketed
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LP Record
The LP (from "long playing" or "long play") is an analog sound storage medium, a vinyl record format characterized by a speed of  33 1⁄3 rpm , a 12 or 10 inch (30 or 25 cm) diameter, and use of the "microgroove" groove specification. Introduced by Columbia in 1948, it was soon adopted as a new standard by the entire record industry. Apart from a few relatively minor refinements and the important later addition of stereophonic sound , it has remained the standard format for vinyl albums
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Compact Disc
COMPACT DISC (CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format released in 1982 and co-developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
. The format was originally developed to store and play only sound recordings but was later adapted for storage of data ( CD-ROM ). Several other formats were further derived from these, including write-once audio and data storage ( CD-R ), rewritable media ( CD-RW ), Video Compact Disc
Compact Disc
( VCD ), Super Video Compact Disc
Compact Disc
(S VCD ), Photo CD , PictureCD, CD-i , and Enhanced Music CD . The first commercially available Audio CD player , the Sony
Sony
CDP-101 , was released October 1982 in Japan
Japan

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Mp3
MPEG-1
MPEG-1
OR MPEG-2
MPEG-2
AUDIO LAYER III, more commonly referred to as MP3 (or MP3), is an audio coding format for digital audio . It uses a form of lossy data compression to encode data using inexact approximations and partial data discarding to reduce file sizes, typically by a factor of 10, in comparison with a CD while retaining a sound quality comparable to uncompressed audio. Compared to CD quality digital audio, MP3 compression commonly achieves 75 to 95% reduction in size. MP3 files are thus 1/4 to 1/20 the size of the original digital audio stream. This is important for both transmission and storage concerns. The basis for such comparison is the CD digital audio format which requires 1411200 bit/s. A commonly used MP3 encoding setting is CBR 128 kbit/s resulting in file of 1/11 (=9%) of the size of the original CD -quality file, that is with 91% compression
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Audio Cassette
The COMPACT CASSETTE or MUSICASSETTE (MC), also commonly called CASSETTE TAPE, AUDIO CASSETTE, or simply TAPE or CASSETTE, is an analog magnetic tape recording format for audio recording and playback . It was released by Philips
Philips
in 1962, having been developed in Hasselt , Belgium
Belgium
. Compact cassettes come in two forms, either already containing content as a pre-recorded cassette, or as a fully recordable "blank" cassette. Both forms are reversible by the user. The compact cassette technology was originally designed for dictation machines , but improvements in fidelity led the Compact Cassette to supplant the Stereo 8-track cartridge and reel-to-reel tape recording in most non-professional applications. Its uses ranged from portable audio to home recording to data storage for early microcomputers . The first cassette player (although mono) designed for use in car dashes was introduced in 1968
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Recording Studio
A RECORDING STUDIO is a specialized facility for sound recording , mixing and audio production of instrumental or vocal musical performances, spoken words and other sounds. They range in size from a small in-home "project studio" large enough to record a single singer-guitarist, to a large building with space for a full orchestra of 100 or more musicians. Ideally both the recording and monitoring (listening and mixing) spaces are specially designed by an acoustician or audio engineer to achieve optimum acoustic properties (acoustic isolation or diffusion or absorption of reflected sound "echoes" that could otherwise interfere with the sound heard by the listener). Recording studios may be used to record singers , instrumental musicians (e.g., electric guitar, piano, saxophone, or ensembles such as orchestras ), voice-over artists for advertisements or dialogue replacement in film, television or animation, foley , or to record their accompanying musical soundtracks
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Take
A TAKE is a single continuous recorded performance. The term is used in film and music to denote and track the stages of production. CONTENTS* 1 Film * 1.1 Single-takes * 1.2 Long takes * 1.3 Multiple takes * 2 Music recording * 3 See also * 4 References FILMIn cinematography , a take refers to each filmed "version" of a particular shot or "setup". Takes of each shot are generally numbered starting with "take one" and the number of each successive take is increased (with the director calling for "take two" or "take eighteen") until the filming of the shot is completed. Film takes are often designated with the aid of a clapperboard . It is also referred to as the slate. The number of each take is written or attached to the clapboard, which is filmed briefly prior to or at the beginning of the actual take. Only those takes which are vetted by the continuity person and/or script supervisor are printed and are sent to the film editor
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Audio Mixing (recorded Music)
In sound recording and reproduction , AUDIO MIXING is the process of combining multitrack recordings into a single track. These tracks that are blended together are done so by using various processes such as EQ, Compression and Reverb. The track may be mixed in mono , stereo , or surround sound . There are numerous approaches, methods and techniques involved in Audio mixing; some of these practices include levels setting, equalization, stereo panning, and effects. Audio mixing techniques and approaches can vary widely, and these can greatly affect the qualities of the sound recording. Audio mixing techniques largely depend on music genres and the quality of sound recordings involved. The process is generally carried out by a mixing engineer , though sometimes the musical producer or music artist may assist. After mixing, a mastering engineer prepares the final product for production. Audio mixing may be transferred onto a mixing console or digital audio workstation
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Overdubbing
OVERDUBBING (the process of making an OVERDUB, or OVERDUBS) is a technique used in audio recording, whereby a performer listens to an existing recorded performance (usually through headphones in a recording studio ) and simultaneously plays a new performance along with it, which is also recorded. The intention is that the final mix will contain a combination of these "dubs ". Tracking (or "laying the basic tracks") of the rhythm section (usually including drums) to a song, then following with overdubs (solo instruments, such as keyboards or guitar , then finally vocals), has been the standard technique for recording popular music since the early 1960s. Today, overdubbing can be accomplished even on basic recording equipment, or a typical PC equipped with a sound card , using digital audio workstation software
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Reverberation
REVERBERATION, in psychoacoustics and acoustics , is the persistence of sound after a sound is produced. A reverberation, or REVERB, is created when a sound or signal is reflected causing a large number of reflections to build up and then decay as the sound is absorbed by the surfaces of objects in the space – which could include furniture, people, and air. This is most noticeable when the sound source stops but the reflections continue, decreasing in amplitude , until they reach zero amplitude. Reverberation
Reverberation
is frequency dependent: the length of the decay, or reverberation time, receives special consideration in the architectural design of spaces which need to have specific reverberation times to achieve optimum performance for their intended activity. In comparison to a distinct echo that is a minimum of 50 to 100 ms after the initial sound, reverberation is the occurrence of reflections that arrive in less than approximately 50 ms
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