HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Album
An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a single item on CD, record, audio tape or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century, first as books of individual 78rpm records, then from 1948 as vinyl LP records played at ​33 1⁄3 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though in the 21st-century album sales have mostly focused on compact disc (CD) and MP3
MP3
formats. However, vinyl sales have been on the rise in recent years.[1] The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s. An album may be recorded in a recording studio (fixed or mobile), in a concert venue, at home, in the field, or a mix of places. The time frame for completely recording an album varies between a few hours and several years. This process usually requires several takes with different parts recorded separately, and then brought or "mixed" together
[...More...]

"Album" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gilbert & Sullivan
Gilbert and Sullivan
Gilbert and Sullivan
refers to the Victorian-era theatrical partnership of the dramatist W. S. Gilbert
W. S. Gilbert
(1836–1911) and the composer Arthur Sullivan
Arthur Sullivan
(1842–1900) and to the works they jointly created. The two men collaborated on fourteen comic operas between 1871 and 1896, of which H.M.S
[...More...]

"Gilbert & Sullivan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

History Of Sound Recording
Experiments in capturing sound on a recording medium for preservation and reproduction began in earnest during the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
of the 1800s. Many pioneering attempts to record and reproduce sound were made during the latter half of the 19th century – notably Scott's Phonautograph
Phonautograph
of 1857 – and these efforts culminated in the invention of the phonograph by Thomas Edison
Thomas Edison
in 1877
[...More...]

"History Of Sound Recording" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Mikado
The Mikado; or, The Town of Titipu is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan
Arthur Sullivan
and libretto by W. S. Gilbert, their ninth of fourteen operatic collaborations. It opened on 14 March 1885, in London, where it ran at the Savoy Theatre
Savoy Theatre
for 672 performances, which was the second longest run for any work of musical theatre and one of the longest runs of any theatre piece up to that time.[1][n 1] Before the end of 1885, it was estimated that, in Europe and America, at least 150 companies were producing the opera.[2] The Mikado
The Mikado
remains the most frequently performed Savoy Opera, and it is especially popular with amateur and school productions
[...More...]

"The Mikado" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tchaikovsky
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
(/ˈɪljɪtʃ tʃaɪˈkɒfski/ IL-yitch chy-KOF-skee;[1] Russian: Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский;[a 1] 25 April/7 May 1840 – 25 October/6 November 1893),[a 2] often anglicized as Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky, was a Russian composer of the romantic period, some of whose works are among the most popular music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, bolstered by his appearances as a guest conductor in Europe and the United States. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension. Although musically precocious, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant. There was scant opportunity for a musical career in Russia at that time and no system of public music education
[...More...]

"Tchaikovsky" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carmen
Carmen
Carmen
(French pronunciation: ​[kaʁmɛn]; Spanish: [ˈkarmen]) is an opera in four acts by French composer Georges Bizet. The libretto was written by Henri Meilhac
Henri Meilhac
and Ludovic Halévy, based on a novella of the same title by Prosper Mérimée. The opera was first performed at the Opéra-Comique
Opéra-Comique
in Paris on 3 March 1875, where its breaking of conventions shocked and scandalized its first audiences. Bizet died suddenly after the 33rd performance, unaware that the work would achieve international acclaim within the following ten years. Carmen
Carmen
has since become one of the most popular and frequently performed operas in the classical canon; the "Habanera" from act 1 and the "Toreador Song" from act 2 are among the best known of all operatic arias. The opera is written in the genre of opéra comique with musical numbers separated by dialogue
[...More...]

"Carmen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Deutsche Grammophon
Deutsche Grammophon
Deutsche Grammophon
is a German classical music record label that was the precursor of corporation called PolyGram. It is now part of Universal Music Group
Universal Music Group
(UMG) since its merger with the UMG family of labels in 1999. It is the oldest surviving established record company.[2] History[edit]Record of Emile Berliner's Deutsche Grammophon
Deutsche Grammophon
Gesellschaft. Deutsche Grammophon
Deutsche Grammophon
Gesellschaft was founded in 1898 by German-born United States
United States
citizen Emile Berliner
Emile Berliner
as the German branch of his Berliner Gramophone
Berliner Gramophone
Company. Berliner sent his nephew Joseph Sanders from America to set up operations.[3] Based in the city of Hanover (the founder's birthplace), the company was the German affiliate of the U.S
[...More...]

"Deutsche Grammophon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paul Whiteman
Paul Samuel Whiteman (March 28, 1890 – December 29, 1967) was an American bandleader, composer, orchestral director, and violinist.[1][2] As the leader of one of the most popular dance bands in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s, Whiteman produced recordings that were immensely successful, and press notices often referred to him as the "King of Jazz". Using a large ensemble and exploring many styles of music, Whiteman blended symphonic music and jazz, as in his debut of Rhapsody in Blue
Rhapsody in Blue
by George Gershwin
[...More...]

"Paul Whiteman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stereophonic
Stereophonic sound
Stereophonic sound
or, more commonly, stereo, is a method of sound reproduction that creates an illusion of multi-directional audible perspective. This is usually achieved by using two or more independent audio channels through a configuration of two or more loudspeakers (or stereo headphones) in such a way as to create the impression of sound heard from various directions, as in natural hearing.[1] Thus the term "stereophonic" applies to so-called "quadraphonic" and "surround-sound" systems as well as the more common two-channel, two-speaker systems. It is often contrasted with monophonic, or "mono" sound, where audio is heard as coming from one position, often ahead in the sound field (analogous to a visual field). In the 2000s, stereo sound is common in entertainment systems such as broadcast radio, TV, recorded music, and cinema.How stereophonic & duophonic sound systems work
[...More...]

"Stereophonic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polyvinyl Chloride
Polyvinyl chloride
Polyvinyl chloride
(/ˌpɒlivaɪnəl ˈklɔːraɪd/),[5] also known as polyvinyl or vinyl,[6] commonly abbreviated PVC, is the world's third-most widely produced synthetic plastic polymer, after polyethylene and polypropylene.[7] PVC comes in two basic forms: rigid (sometimes abbreviated as RPVC) and flexible. The rigid form of PVC is used in construction for pipe and in profile applications such as doors and windows. It is also used in making bottles, non-food packaging, and cards (such as bank or membership cards). It can be made softer and more flexible by the addition of plasticizers, the most widely used being phthalates. In this form, it is also used in plumbing, electrical cable insulation, imitation leather, signage, phonograph records,[8] inflatable products, and many applications where it replaces rubber.[9] Pure polyvinyl chloride is a white, brittle solid
[...More...]

"Polyvinyl Chloride" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Minidisc
MiniDisc
MiniDisc
(MD) is a magneto-optical disc-based data storage format offering a capacity of 74 minutes and, later, 80 minutes, of digitized audio or 1 gigabyte of Hi-MD
Hi-MD
data. Sony
Sony
brand audio players were on the market from September 1992 until March 2013.[1] MiniDisc
MiniDisc
was announced by Sony
Sony
in September 1992 and released in November of that year for sale in Japan and in December in Europe, Canada, the USA and other countries.[2] The music format was originally based on ATRAC
ATRAC
audio data compression, but the option of linear PCM digital recording was later introduced to attain audio quality comparable to that of a compact disc
[...More...]

"Minidisc" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

CD
Compact disc
Compact disc
(CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format that was co-developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
and released in 1982. The format was originally developed to store and play only sound recordings but was later adapted for storage of data (CD-ROM). Several other formats were further derived from these, including write-once audio and data storage (CD-R), rewritable media (CD-RW), Video Compact Disc (VCD), Super Video Compact Disc (SVCD), Photo CD, PictureCD, CD-i, and Enhanced Music CD. The first commercially available Audio CD player, the Sony
Sony
CDP-101, was released October 1982 in Japan. Standard CDs have a diameter of 120 millimetres (4.7 in) and can hold up to about 80 minutes of uncompressed audio or about 700  MiB of data
[...More...]

"CD" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Printed Music
Sheet music
Sheet music
is a handwritten or printed form of music notation that uses modern musical symbols to indicate the pitches (melodies), rhythms or chords of a song or instrumental musical piece
[...More...]

"Printed Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paperboard
Paperboard
Paperboard
is a thick paper-based material. While there is no rigid differentiation between paper and paperboard, paperboard is generally thicker (usually over 0.30 mm, 0.012 in, or 12 points) than paper and has certain superior attributes such as foldability and rigidity. According to ISO standards, paperboard is a paper with a grammage above 250 g/m2, but there are exceptions.[1] Paperboard
Paperboard
can be single- or multi-ply. Paperboard
Paperboard
can be easily cut and formed, is lightweight, and because it is strong, is used in packaging
[...More...]

"Paperboard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Headphones
Headphones
Headphones
(or head-phones in the early days of telephony and radio) are a pair of small loudspeaker drivers worn on or around the head over a user's ears. They are electroacoustic transducers, which convert an electrical signal to a corresponding sound. Headphones
Headphones
let a single user listen to an audio source privately, in contrast to a loudspeaker, which emits sound into the open air for anyone nearby to hear. Headphones
Headphones
are also known as earspeakers, earphones[1] or, colloquially, cans.[2] Circumaural and supra-aural headphones use a band over the top of the head to hold the speakers in place. The other type, known as earbuds or earpieces[1] consist of individual units that plug into the user's ear canal. In the context of telecommunication, a headset is a combination of headphone and microphone
[...More...]

"Headphones" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Libretto
A libretto is the text used in, or intended for, an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, oratorio, cantata or musical. The term libretto is also sometimes used to refer to the text of major liturgical works, such as the Mass, requiem and sacred cantata, or the story line of a ballet. Libretto
Libretto
(pronounced [liˈbretto]; plural libretti [liˈbretti]), from Italian, is the diminutive of the word libro ("book"). Sometimes other language equivalents are used for libretti in that language, livret for French works and Textbuch for German. A libretto is distinct from a synopsis or scenario of the plot, in that the libretto contains all the words and stage directions, while a synopsis summarizes the plot
[...More...]

"Libretto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.