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Albert, Prince Consort
Prince Albert of Saxe- Coburg
Coburg
and Gotha (Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel;[1] 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria. He was born in the Saxon duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, to a family connected to many of Europe's ruling monarchs. At the age of 20, he married his first cousin, Queen Victoria; they had nine children. Initially he felt constrained by his role of consort, which did not afford him power or responsibilities. He gradually developed a reputation for supporting public causes, such as educational reform and the abolition of slavery worldwide, and was entrusted with running the Queen's household, office and estates. He was heavily involved with the organisation of the Great Exhibition of 1851, which was a resounding success. Victoria came to depend more and more on his support and guidance
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Brussels
Brussels
Brussels
(French: Bruxelles, [bʁysɛl] ( listen); Dutch: Brussel, [ˈbrɵsəl] ( listen)), officially the Brussels-Capital Region[6][7] (French: Région de Bruxelles-Capitale, Dutch: Brussels
Brussels
Hoofdstedelijk Gewest),[8] is a region of Belgium comprising 19 municipalities, including the City of Brussels, which is the de jure capital of Belgium.[9] The Brussels-Capital Region
Brussels-Capital Region
is located in the central portion of the country and is a part of both the French Community of Belgium[10] and the Flemish Community,[11] but is separate from the region of Flanders
Flanders
(in which it forms an enclave) or Wallonia.[12][13] Compared to most regions in Europe, Brussels
Brussels
has a relatively small territory, with an area of 161 km2 (62 sq mi)
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Dynasty
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
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Avunculate Marriage
An avunculate marriage is any marriage between an uncle and a niece/nephew or between an aunt and a niece/nephew. It may refer to a marriage between biological relatives or people related by marriage. In some countries, avunculate marriages are prohibited by law, while in others marriages between biological relatives of this kind are both legal and common. If the partners in an avunculate marriage are biologically related, they normally have the same genetic relationship as half-siblings, or a grandparent and grandchild – that is they share approximately 25% of their genetic material
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Frederick IV, Duke Of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg
Frederick IV, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg
Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg
(Gotha, 28 November 1774 – Gotha, 11 February 1825), was the last duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg. He was the third but second surviving son of Ernst II, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg
Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg
and Charlotte de Saxe-Meiningen. After the death of his older brother August without sons (1822), Frederick (the only surviving male of the house) inherited the duchy of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg. Frederick fought - after military training - in the Napoleonic campaigns and was heavily wounded. As a consequence of these injuries, he was constantly ill until his death. Because of his illness, he traveled for a long time seeking a cure
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Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor
Francis II (German: Franz; 12 February 1768 – 2 March 1835) was the last Holy Roman Emperor, ruling from 1792 until 6 August 1806, when he dissolved the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
of the German Nation after the decisive defeat at the hands of the First French Empire
First French Empire
led by Napoleon
Napoleon
at the Battle of Austerlitz. In 1804, he had founded the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
and became Francis I, the first Emperor of Austria, ruling from 1804 to 1835, so later he was named the one and only Doppelkaiser (double emperor) in history.[1] For the two years between 1804 and 1806, Francis used the title and style by the Grace of God elected Roman Emperor, ever Augustus, hereditary Emperor of Austria and he was called the Emperor of both the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
and Austria
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Countess Augusta Reuss Of Ebersdorf
Ebersdorf may refer to the following places: Ebersdorf bei Coburg, in the district of Coburg, Bavaria, Germany Ebersdorf, Lower Saxony, in the district of Rotenburg, Lower Saxony, Germany Ebersdorf, Saalburg-Ebersdorf, a village in the town of Saalburg-Ebersdorf, Thuringia, Germany Ebersdorf, Austria, in the district of Hartberg, Styria, AustriaSee also[edit]Kaiserebersdorf (de), a former municipality, since 1982 a district of Vienna, AustriaKaiserebersdorf Castle (de), which has served at various times as a fortress, a Hapsburg hunting lodge, and a prisonThis disambiguation page lists articles about distinct geographical locations with the same name. If an internal link le
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Itz
The Itz is a river in Germany and a 79-kilometre (49 mi) right tributary of the Main. The Itz begins in Sachsenbrunn (Stelzen), Thuringia and flows southward through Bachfeld and Schalkau. It crosses into Bavaria and feeds the Froschgrundsee reservoir. It continues through Dörfles-Esbach, Coburg, and Großheirath, then is joined by the Rodach north of Itzgrund. It continues southward to Rattelsdorf and Baunach, where it joins the Main. The Itz flooded Coburg in early 2003.[2] References[edit]^ a b Complete table of the Bavarian Waterbody Register by the Bavarian State Office for the Environment (xls, 10.3 MB) ^ "Winds, Rains Pound Europe; 6 Killed". Los Angeles Times. January 4, 2003. p. A-7. Retrieved 2008-11-16. Authority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 248568660 GND: 4109175-9This article related to a river in Bavaria is a stub
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Evangelical Church In Germany
The Evangelical
Evangelical
Church in Germany
Germany
(German: Evangelische Kirche in Deutschland, abbreviated EKD) is a federation of twenty Lutheran, Reformed
Reformed
(Calvinist) and United (Prussian Union) Protestant regional churches and denominations in Germany, which collectively encompasses the vast majority of Protestants in that country. In 2016, the EKD had a membership of 21,922,000 members, or 26.7% of the German population.[3] It constitutes one of the largest national Protestant bodies in the world
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Ducal
A duke (male) (British English: /djuːk/[1] or American English: /duːk/[2]) or duchess (female) can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of the nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch. The title comes from French duc, itself from the Latin dux, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank (particularly one of Germanic or Celtic origin), and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province. The title dux survived in the Eastern Roman Empire
Eastern Roman Empire
where it was used in several contexts signifying a rank equivalent to a captain or general. Later on, in the 11th century, the title Megas Doux
Megas Doux
was introduced for the post of commander-in-chief of the entire navy. During the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
the title (as Herzog) signified first among the Germanic monarchies
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Secretary Of State For Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs
Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, normally referred to as the Foreign Secretary, is a senior official within the Government of the United Kingdom
Government of the United Kingdom
and head of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. The Foreign Secretary is a member of the Cabinet, and the post is considered one of the Great Offices of State
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Interventionism (politics)
Interventionism is a policy of non-defensive (proactive) activity undertaken by a nation-state, or other geo-political jurisdiction of a lesser or greater nature, to manipulate an economy and/or society
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Parliament Of The United Kingdom
HM Government     Conservative Party (245)Confidence and supply     Democratic Unionist
Democratic Unionist
Party (3)HM Most Loyal Opposition     Labour Party (191)Other opposition     Liberal Democrats (98)      Non-affiliated (29)      UKIP (3)      Ind. Labour (3)      Ulster Unionist Party
Ulster Unionist Party
(2)      Green Party (1)      Ind. Social Democrat (1)      Ind
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Constitutional Monarchy
A constitutional monarchy is a form of monarchy in which the sovereign exercise authority in accordance with a written or unwritten constitution.[1] Constitutional monarchy
Constitutional monarchy
differs from absolute monarchy (in which a monarch holds absolute power), in that constitutional monarchs are bound to exercise their powers and authorities within the limits prescribed within an established legal framework
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Abolitionism
Abolitionism
Abolitionism
is a general term which describes the movement to end slavery. This term can be used formally or informally. In Western Europe and the Americas, abolitionism is a historical movement in effort to end the African and Indian slave trade and set slaves free. King Charles I of Spain, usually known as Emperor Charles V, was following the example of Louis X of France
Louis X of France
who abolished slavery within the Kingdom of France
Kingdom of France
in 1315. He passed a law which would have abolished colonial slavery in 1542, although this law was not passed in the largest colonial states, and was not enforced. In the late 17th century, the Roman Catholic Church, taking up a plea by Lourenço da Silva de Mendouça, officially condemned the slave trade, which was affirmed vehemently by Pope Gregory XVI
Pope Gregory XVI
in 1839
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Educational Reform
Education reform
Education reform
is the name given to the goal of changing public education. Historically, reforms have taken different forms because the motivations of reformers have differed. However, since the 1980s, education reform has been focused on changing the existing system from one focused on inputs to one focused on outputs (i.e., student achievement). In the United States, education reform acknowledges and encourages public education as the primary source of K-12 education for American youth. Education reformers desire to make public education into a market (in the form of an input-output system), where accountability creates high-stakes from curriculum standards tied to standardized tests.[1][2] As a result of this input-output system, equality has been conceptualized as an end point, which is often evidenced by an achievement gap among diverse populations.[3] This conceptualization of education reform is based on the market-logic of competition
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