HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Albert Sammons
Albert Edward Sammons CBE (23 February 1886 – 24 August 1957) was an English violinist, composer and later violin teacher. Almost self-taught on the violin, he had a wide repertoire as both chamber musician and soloist, although his reputation rests mainly on his association with British composers, especially Elgar. He made a number of recordings over 40 years, many of which have been re-issued on CD.Contents1 Life 2 Instruments 3 Premieres 4 Recordings 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Albert Sammons
Albert Sammons
was born in Fulham, the second eldest of four children. His father was a shoemaker and good amateur violinist. Sammons started to receive some lessons from his father around the age of seven. Apart from these lessons, he was virtually self-taught. His first professional engagement was in the band at the Earls Court Exhibition in 1898; the conductor was so impressed by the 12-year-old that he made him leader
[...More...]

"Albert Sammons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Commander Of The Order Of The British Empire
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
British Empire
is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions
Dominions
of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
[...More...]

"Commander Of The Order Of The British Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Violin Concerto No. 3 (Mozart)
The Violin
Violin
Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216, was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Salzburg in 1775. Mozart was only 19 at the time.Contents1 Instrumentation 2 Movements2.1 I. Allegro 2.2 II. Adagio 2.3 III. Rondeau3 Notable recordings 4 References 5 External linksInstrumentation[edit] Solo violin, two violins, viola, cello, double bass, two horns, two oboes (except second movement), two flutes (only at the second movement) Movements[edit] The piece is in three movements:Allegro Adagio Rondeau. AllegroI. Allegro[edit]The Allegro is in sonata form, opening with a G major
G major
theme, played by the orchestra. The main theme is a bright and happy discussion between the solo violin and the accompaniment, followed by a modulation to the dominant D major, then its parallel key D minor. It experiments in other keys but does not settle and eventually heads back to the tonic, G major, in the recapitulation. II
[...More...]

"Violin Concerto No. 3 (Mozart)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pierre Monteux
Pierre Benjamin Monteux (pronounced [pjɛʁ mɔ̃.tø]; 4 April 1875 – 1 July 1964)[n 1] was a French (later American) conductor. After violin and viola studies, and a decade as an orchestral player and occasional conductor, he began to receive regular conducting engagements in 1907. He came to prominence when, for Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes
Ballets Russes
company between 1911 and 1914, he conducted the world premieres of Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring and other prominent works including Petrushka, Ravel's Daphnis et Chloé, and Debussy's Jeux. Thereafter he directed orchestras around the world for more than half a century. From 1917 to 1919 Monteux was the principal conductor of the French repertoire at the Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
in New York
[...More...]

"Pierre Monteux" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dieppe, Seine-Maritime
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Dieppe
Dieppe
(French pronunciation: ​[djɛp]) is a coastal community in the Arrondissement of Dieppe
Arrondissement of Dieppe
in the Seine-Maritime
Seine-Maritime
department in the Normandy
Normandy
region of northern France. The population stood at 34,670 in 2006. A port on the English Channel, at the mouth of the Arques river, famous for its scallops, and with a regular ferry service to Newhaven in England, Dieppe
Dieppe
also has a popular pebbled beach, a 15th-century castle and the churches of Saint-Jacques and Saint-Remi
[...More...]

"Dieppe, Seine-Maritime" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Edward Elgar
Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet
Baronet
OM GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English composer, many of whose works have entered the British and international classical concert repertoire. Among his best-known compositions are orchestral works including the Enigma Variations, the Pomp and Circumstance Marches, concertos for violin and cello, and two symphonies. He also composed choral works, including The Dream of Gerontius, chamber music and songs. He was appointed Master of the King's Musick
Master of the King's Musick
in 1924. Although Elgar is often regarded as a typically English composer, most of his musical influences were not from England but from continental Europe. He felt himself to be an outsider, not only musically, but socially
[...More...]

"Edward Elgar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Proms
The Proms, more formally known as the Henry Wood
Henry Wood
Promenade Concerts presented by the BBC, is an eight-week summer season of daily orchestral classical music concerts and other events held annually, predominantly in the Royal Albert Hall
Royal Albert Hall
in central London, England, UK. Founded in 1895, seasons now consist of concerts in Albert Hall, chamber music concerts at Cadogan Hall, additional Proms in the Park events across the UK on the Last Night of the Proms, and associated educational and children's events. The season is a significant event in British culture. In classical music, Jiří Bělohlávek
Jiří Bělohlávek
described the Proms as "the world's largest and most democratic musical festival".[1] Prom is short for promenade concert, a term which originally referred to outdoor concerts in London's pleasure gardens, where the audience was free to stroll around while the orchestra was playing
[...More...]

"The Proms" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

George Weldon
George Anthony Thomas Weldon[1] (5 June 1908, in Chichester, England – 17 August 1963, in South Africa) was an English conductor.Contents1 Biography 2 Recordings 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Weldon was the son of Major F H Weldon of the Sherwood Foresters.[2] He was educated at Sherborne School
Sherborne School
and the Royal College of Music. He studied conducting with Malcolm Sargent[3] and Aylmer Buesst.[4] In 1943, at 36 years of age, he became the conductor of the City of Birmingham Orchestra in succession to Leslie Heward
[...More...]

"George Weldon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

BBC Symphony Orchestra
An orchestra (/ˈɔːrkɪstrə/ or US: /ˈɔːrˌkɛstrə/; Italian: [orˈkɛstra]) is a large instrumental ensemble typical of classical music, which mixes instruments from different families, including bowed string instruments such as violin, viola, cello and double bass, as well as brass, woodwinds, and percussion instruments, each grouped in sections. Other instruments such as the piano and celesta may sometimes appear in a fifth keyboard section or may stand alone, as may the concert harp and, for performances of some modern compositions, electronic instruments. The term orchestra derives from the Greek ὀρχήστρα (orchestra), the name for the area in front of a stage in ancient Greek theatre reserved for the Greek chorus.[1] A full-size orchestra may sometimes be called a symphony orchestra or philharmonic orchestra
[...More...]

"BBC Symphony Orchestra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Violin Concerto (Beethoven)
Ludwig van Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven
composed a Violin
Violin
Concerto
Concerto
in D major, Op. 61, in 1806. Its first performance by Franz Clement was unsuccessful and for some decades the work languished in obscurity, until revived in 1844 by Joseph Joachim. Since then it has become one of the best-known violin concertos.Contents1 Genesis 2 Performance history 3 Performance practice 4 Structure4.1 Cadenzas5 Alternative versions 6 Recordings 7 References 8 External linksGenesis[edit] Beethoven had previously written a number of pieces for violin and orchestra. At some point in 1790–2, before his musical maturity, he began a Violin
Violin
Concerto
Concerto
in C, of which only a fragment of the first movement survives
[...More...]

"Violin Concerto (Beethoven)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Violin Concerto (Brahms)
The Violin
Violin
Concerto
Concerto
in D major, Op. 77, was composed by Johannes Brahms in 1878 and dedicated to his friend, the violinist Joseph Joachim. It is Brahms's only violin concerto, and, according to Joachim, one of the four great German violin concerti:[1]The Germans have four violin concertos. The greatest, most uncompromising is Beethoven's. The one by Brahms vies with it in seriousness. The richest, the most seductive, was written by Max Bruch
[...More...]

"Violin Concerto (Brahms)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Frederick Delius
Frederick Theodore Albert Delius, CH (/ˈdiːliəs/ 29 January 1862 – 10 June 1934) was an English composer. Born in the north of England to a prosperous mercantile family, he resisted attempts to recruit him to commerce. He was sent to Florida
Florida
in the United States in 1884 to manage an orange plantation. There he soon neglected his managerial duties, and in 1886 returned to Europe. Having been influenced by African-American music
African-American music
during his short stay in Florida, he began composing
[...More...]

"Frederick Delius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fulham
Fulham
Fulham
(/ˈfʊləm/) is an area of the London
London
Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham
Fulham
in west London, England, 3.7 miles (6.0 km) south-west of Charing Cross
[...More...]

"Fulham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Violin Sonata (Debussy)
The Six sonatas for various instruments (French: Six sonates pour divers instruments) by Claude Debussy
Claude Debussy
(1862–1918) was a projected cycle of sonatas, that were interrupted by his death in 1918, after only having composed half of the projected sonatas
[...More...]

"Violin Sonata (Debussy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Claude Debussy
Achille- Claude Debussy
Claude Debussy
(French: [aʃil klod dəbysi];[1] 22 August 1862 – 25 March 1918)[2] was a French composer
[...More...]

"Claude Debussy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fritz Kreisler
Friedrich "Fritz" Kreisler (February 2, 1875 – January 29, 1962) was an Austrian-born violinist and composer.[1] One of the most noted violin masters of his day, and regarded as one of the greatest violin masters of all time, he was known for his sweet tone and expressive phrasing. Like many great violinists of his generation, he produced a characteristic sound which was immediately recognizable as his own
[...More...]

"Fritz Kreisler" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.