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Al-Imran
The Family of Imran or Surat Āl ʻImrān (Arabic: سورة آل عمران‎)[1] is the third chapter of the Quran
Quran
with two hundred verses.Contents1 Context 2 Contents2.1 Verses 1–6 2.2 Verse 73 References 4 External linksContext[edit] Imran in Islam is regarded as the father of Maryam. This chapter is named after the family Imran, which includes Imran (Joachim), Saint Anne, Mary, and Isa (Jesus). The chapter is believed to have been revealed in Medina
Medina
and is either the second or third Medinan surah as it engages both the Battle of Badr
Battle of Badr
in its first section and the battle of Uhud at its end. Almost all of it also belongs to the third year of the Hijra with the possible exception of verse 61, which mentions the event of Mubahala and therefore might have been revealed during the visit of the Najrān Christian deputation which occurred in the 10th year of the Hijrah
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Sura
A Surah
Surah
(/ˈsʊərə/;[1] also spelled Sura; Arabic: سورة‎ sūrah, plural سور suwar) is the term for a chapter of the Quran. There are 114 Surahs in the Quran, each divided into verses.[2] The chapters or suras are of unequal length; the shortest chapter (Al-Kawthar) has only three ayat (verses) while the longest (Al-Baqara) contains 286 verses.[3] Of the 114 chapters in the Quran, 87 are classified as Meccan, while 27 are Medinan [4]. This classification is only approximate in regard to location of revelation; any chapter revealed after migration of Muhammad
Muhammad
to Medina (Hijrah) is termed Medinan and any revealed before that event is termed Meccan
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Naskh (tafsir)
Naskh (نسخ) is an Arabic
Arabic
word usually translated as "abrogation"; It is a term used in Islamic
Islamic
legal exegesis for seemingly contradictory material within, or between, the two primary sources of Islamic
Islamic
law: the Quran
Quran
and the Sunna. Several Qur'anic verses state that some revelations have been abrogated and superseded by later revelations,[1][2] which are understood by many Muslim scholars as pertaining to the verses of the Quran
Quran
itself.[citation needed] Neither the Quran
Quran
nor the sayings of Muhammad
Muhammad
state which verses stand abrogated
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Quran Translations
Translations of the Qur'an are interpretations of the scripture of Islam
Islam
in languages other than Arabic. Qur'an was originally written in the Arabic language
Arabic language
and has been translated into most major African, Asian and European languages.[1]Contents1 Islamic theology 2 History2.1 European languages2.1.1 Latin 2.1.2 Modern languages 2.1.3 French Language 2.1.4 Spanish 2.1.5 English2.2 Asian languages2.2.1 Urdu 2.2.2 Bengali 2.2.3 Hindi
Hindi
and Gujarati 2.2.4 Tamil 2.2.5 Turkish 2.2.6 Japanese 2.2.7 Chinese 2.2.8 Indonesian languages 2.2.9 Nuclear Malayo-Polynesian languages2.3 African languages 2.4 Esperanto3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksIslamic theology[edit] Further information: Islamic theology Translation of the Qur'an has always been a problematic and difficult issue in Islamic theology
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List Of Translations Of The Quran
Contents1 Historical (up to the 21st century)1.1 7th–10th centuries 1.2 10th century 1.3 11th century 1.4 12th century 1.5 13th century 1.6 16th century 1.7 17th century 1.8 18th century 1.9 19th century 1.10 20th century 1.11 21st century 1.12 Holy Quran
Quran
in Excel Format2 By writer and language2.1 Acehnese 2.2 Afrikaans 2.3 Albanian 2.4 Assamese 2.5 Azerbaijani 2.6 Balochi 2.7 Belarusian 2.8 Bengali 2.9 Bosnian 2.10 Brushaski 2.11 Buginese 2.12 Bulgarian 2.13 Catalan 2.14 Chinese 2.15 Czech 2.16 Danish 2.17 Dutch 2.18 English 2.19 Esperanto 2.20 Estonian 2.21 Finnish 2.22 French 2.23
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English Translations Of The Quran
The Quran
Quran
has been translated into English many times. The first few translations were made in the 17th and 19th centuries, but the majority were produced in the 20th.Contents1 Early translations 2 20th century translations 3 21st century translations 4 Translations from Urdu
Urdu
into English 5 See also 6 References 7 External links7.1 archive.org 7.2 wikisourceEarly translations[edit]The Alcoran, Translated out of Arabic into French. By the Andrew du Ryer, Lord of Malezair, and Resident for the French King, at ALEXANDRIA. And Newly Englished, for the satisfaction of all that desire to look into the Turkish Vanities London, Printed Anno Dom. 1649 The earliest known translation of the Qur'an
Qur'an
into the English Language was The Alcoran of Mahomet in 1649 by Alexander Ross, chaplain to King Charles I
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Ahmadiyya Translations Of The Quran
Translations
Translations
is a three-act play by Irish playwright Brian Friel, written in 1980. It is set in Baile Beag (Ballybeg), a Donegal village in 19th century agricultural Ireland. Friel has said that Translations is "a play about language and only about language", but it deals with a wide range of issues, stretching from language and communication to Irish history and cultural imperialism. Friel responds strongly to both political and language questions in the modern-day Republic of Ireland
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History Of The Quran
The history of the Quran
Quran
refers to the oral revelation of the Quran
Quran
to Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
and its subsequent written compilation into a manuscript. It spans several decades and forms an important part of early Islamic history. According to Muslim belief and Islamic scholarly accounts, the revelation of the Quran
Quran
began in 610 C.E. when the angel Gabriel (Arabic: جبريل, Jibrīl or جبرائيل, Jibrāʾīl) appeared to Muhammad
Muhammad
in the cave Hira
Hira
near Mecca, reciting to him the first verses of Sura
Sura
Iqra
Iqra
(al-`Alaq)
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Samarkand Kufic Quran
The Samarkand
Samarkand
Kufic
Kufic
Quran
Quran
(also known as the Uthman Quran, Samarkand codex, Samarkand
Samarkand
manuscript and Tashkent
Tashkent
Quran) is an 8th or 9th century manuscript Quran
Quran
written in the territory of modern Iraq
Iraq
in the Kufic
Kufic
script
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Sana'a Manuscript
The Sana'a
Sana'a
palimpsest, sometimes referred to as Ṣanʿā’ 1, or as DAM 01-27.1 (with reference to the catalog number for the major collection of its folios) is one of the oldest Quranic manuscripts in existence.[1] Part of a sizable cache of Quranic and non-Quranic fragments discovered in Yemen
Yemen
during a 1972 restoration of the Great Mosque of Sana'a, the manuscript was identified as a palimpsest Quran in 1981; as it is written on parchment and comprises two layers of text. The upper text largely conforms to the standard 'Uthmanic' Quran in text and in the standard order of suras; whereas the lower text contains many variations from the standard text, and the sequence of its suras corresponds to no known quranic order
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Topkapi Manuscript
The Topkapi manuscript
Topkapi manuscript
is an early manuscript of the Quran
Quran
dated to the late 1st century / early 2nd century AH (i.e. early to mid 8th century AD)[citation needed] This manuscript is kept in the Topkapi Palace
Topkapi Palace
Museum, Istanbul, Turkey. It is attributed to Uthman Ibn Affan
Uthman Ibn Affan
(d. 656) Similar illuminations can be found in the Dome of the Rock
Dome of the Rock
in Jerusalem, the Umayyad Mosque
Umayyad Mosque
in Damascus and other Umayyad monuments. The size of this manuscript is 41 cm x 46 cm. It contains more than 99% of the text of the Qur'an
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Birmingham Quran Manuscript
The Birmingham Quran
Quran
manuscript is a parchment on which two leaves of an early Quranic manuscript are written. In 2015 the manuscript, which is held by the University of Birmingham,[1] was radiocarbon dated to between 568 and 645 AD (in the Islamic calendar, between 56 BH and 25 AH).[2][3] It is part of the Mingana Collection
Mingana Collection
of Middle Eastern manuscripts, held by the university's Cadbury Research Library.[2] The manuscript is written in ink on parchment, using an Arabic Hijazi script and is still clearly legible.[3] The leaves preserve parts of Surahs 19 (Maryam)
19 (Maryam)
to 20 (Taha).[4] It was on display at the University of Birmingham
University of Birmingham
in 2015 and then at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery until 5 August 2016.[5] The Cadbury Research Library
Cadbury Research Library
has carried out multispectral analysis of the manuscript
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Tafsir
Tafsir
Tafsir
(Arabic: تفسير‎, translit. Tafsīr, lit. 'interpretation') is the Arabic word for exegesis, usually of the Qur'an. An author of tafsir is a mufassir (Arabic: مُفسّر‎; plural: Arabic: مفسّرون‎, translit. mufassirūn). A Qur'anic
Qur'anic
tafsir attempts at providing elucidation, explanation, interpretation, or commentary for clear understanding and conviction of God's will.[1] Principally, tafsir deals with the issues of linguistics, jurisprudence, and theology. In terms of perspective and approach, tafsir can be broadly divided into two categories, namely tafsir bi-al-ma'thur (lit. received tafsir) which is transmitted from the early days of Islam
Islam
through the prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
and his companions, and tafsir bi-al-ra'y (lit
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Esoteric Interpretation Of The Quran
Esoteric interpretation of the Quran, also known as Sufi interpretation and taʾwīl (تأويل), is the allegorical interpretation of the Quran
Quran
or the quest for its hidden, inner meanings. It was a synonym of conventional interpretation in its earliest use, but it came to mean a process of discerning its most fundamental understandings.[1] Esoteric interpretations do not usually contradict the conventional (in this context called exoteric) interpretations; instead, they discuss the inner levels of meaning of the Quran.[2] The words Ta'wil and Tafsir
Tafsir
have been translated to mean explanation, elucidation, interpretation, and commentary; but from the end of the 8th century onwards, 'ta'wil' was commonly regarded as the esoteric or mystical interpretation of the Quran, while the conventional exegesis of the Quran
Quran
was called "tafsir"
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Tarteel
Tarteel (Arabic: ترتيل‎) is the Arabic word for hymnody, the term is commonly translated in reference to the Qur'an
Qur'an
as "recitation, "in proper order" and "with no haste." This word is used in chapter 73 verse 4 of the Qur'an:"and recite the Qur'an
Qur'an
in slow measured rhythmic tones."The Arabic word translated as "slow, measured rhythmic tones" is tarteel. It is also the term used to define the rules explaining proper recitation of the Qur'an
Qur'an
in the manner that Gabriel
Gabriel
revealed it to Muhammad. While reciting one has to keep in mind the fasl (division) and wasl (joining) of words and sentences
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Quranic Hermeneutics
Qur'anic hermeneutics is the study of theories of the interpretation and understanding of the Qur'an, the sacred text of Islam. Since the early centuries of Islam, scholars have sought to mine the wealth of its meanings by developing a variety of different systems of hermeneutics.Contents1 Introduction 2 Specific issues in Islamic hermeneutics2.1 Human rights 2.2 The position of women3 References 4 External linksIntroduction[edit] Hermeneutics
Hermeneutics
in Islam
Islam
leans on a lengthy tradition of tafsir, the exegesis of usually the Qur'an
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