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Akoko
Ondo State
Ondo State
- 815,360  · Akoko
Akoko
North East: 208,080  · Akoko
Akoko
North West: 246,150  · Akoko
Akoko
South East: 95,790  · Akoko
Akoko
South West: 265,340ReligionChristianity · Yoruba religion · IslamʻAkoko, with an initial glottal stop, is the Hawaiian term for the plant genus Euphorbia
Euphorbia
(spurges). Akoko
Akoko
are a large Yoruba cultural sub-group in the Northeastern part of Yorubaland, the area spans from Ondo state
Ondo state
to Edo state in southwest Nigeria. Akoko
Akoko
land takes a large percentage of the local governments in Ondo state
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Ketu (Benin)
Ketu is a historical region in what is now the Republic of Benin, in the area of the town of Kétou (Ketu). It is one of the oldest capitals of the Yoruba speaking people, tracing its establishment to a settlement founded by a descendant of Oduduwa, also known as Odudua, Oòdua and Eleduwa. The regents of the town were traditionally styled "Alaketu", and are related to the Egba sub-group of the Yoruba people in present-day Nigeria. Ketu is considered one of the sixteen original kingdoms established by the children of Oduduwa
Oduduwa
in Oyo mythic history, though this ancient pedigree has been somewhat neglected in contemporary Yoruba historical research, which tends to focus on communities within Nigeria. The exact status of Ketu within the Oyo empire however is contested
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Sagamu
Ogun State
Ogun State
- 512,750  · Remo North: 70,470  · Ikenne: 140,490  · Shagamu: 301,790 Lagos State
Lagos State
- 619,520  · Ikorodu: 619,520ReligionChristianity · Islam · Yoruba religionSagamu OffinLGASagamuLocation i
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Yoruba Traditional Art
The Yoruba of West Africa
West Africa
(Benin, Nigeria
Nigeria
and Togo, with migrant communities in parts of Ghana, and Sierra Leone) are responsible for one of the finest artistic traditions in Africa, a tradition that remains vital and influential today.[1] Much of the art of the Yoruba, including staffs, court dress, and beadwork for crowns, is associated with the royal courts. The courts also commissioned numerous architectural objects such as veranda posts, gates, and doors that are embellished with carvings. Other Yoruba art
Yoruba art
is related shrines and masking traditions. The Yoruba worship a large pantheon of deities, and shrines dedicated to these gods are adorned with carvings and house and array of altar figures and other ritual paraphernalia
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Offa, Kwara
Offa is a city located in Kwara
Kwara
State, central Nigeria
Nigeria
with a population of about 90,000 inhabitants. The vegetation in Offa is savanna vegetation and the town is noted for its weaving and dyeing trade, using vegetable dyes made from locally grown indigo and other plants. Offa is well known for cultivation of Sweet potatoes and maize which also formed part of the favourite staple foods of the indigenes in the town. Offa in one of her eulogy is being address as the home of sweet potatoes. Cattle, goats and sheep are also raised in the environs. The key religions practised in the town are:- Islam, Christianity and Traditional religions. The ancient tradition for which the town is known is wrestling
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Dassa-Zoumé
Dassa-Zoumé, often shortened to Dassa, is a city in Benin, on the Cotonou
Cotonou
to Parakou
Parakou
railway and the main north-south highway. The commune covers an area of 1711 square kilometres and as of 2013 had a population of 112,118.[1] Jama'at Islamique Ahmadiyya Benin
Benin
has built its central Mosque (Mosquee Moubarqiue) here in 2010. It is a beautiful mosque with a tall, 18-meter minaret just outside the city on main road towards Parakou. Jama'at Islamique Ahmadiyya Benin
Benin
has also built French English bilingual primary school 'Ecole Primaire Publique AHMADIYYA'. www.ahmadiyyabenin.org The population of Dassa town migrated from the Egba subgroup in the western Yoruba country in present-day Nigeria to settle in the present day location
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Mokole Language (Benin)
Mokole (or Mokollé, Mokwale, Monkole, Féri) is a Yoruba language spoken in the villages surrounding the town of Kandi in Benin. It's the northernmost variety of Yoruba. References[edit]^ Mokole at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Mokole". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. v t e Languages of BeninOfficial languageFrenchIndigenous languagesGbeAguna Aja Alada Fon Gen Pherá Phla Tofin Tɔli WaciGurBerba Kabye Lama Lukpa Mbelime Mossi Nateni Ngangam Tammari Tem Waama YomKwaChakosi FoodoYoruboidEde Ifè Mokole YorubaOtherBariba Dendi Fula HausaThis Niger–Congo language-related article is a stub
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Nigeria
The Federal Republic
Republic
of Nigeria, commonly referred to as Nigeria (/naɪˈdʒɪəriə/ ( listen)), is a federal republic in West Africa, bordering Benin
Benin
in the west, Chad
Chad
and Cameroon
Cameroon
in the east, and Niger
Niger
in the north. Its coast in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea
Guinea
in the Atlantic Ocean. It comprises 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where the capital, Abuja
Abuja
is located. Nigeria
Nigeria
is officially a democratic secular country.[6] Nigeria
Nigeria
has been home to a number of kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia
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Ifangni
Ifangni
Ifangni
is a town, arrondissement, and commune in the Plateau Department of south-eastern Benin
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Savé
Savé
Savé
is a city in Benin, lying on the Cotonou- Parakou
Parakou
railway and the main north-south road. It is known for its local boulders, popular with climbers. "Savé" is the corrupted rendition of the historical Yoruba name Sabe The commune covers an area of 2228 square kilometres and as of 2002 had a population of 67,753 people.[2][3] Transport[edit] Savé
Savé
is served by a station of the Benin
Benin
Railways system. See also[edit] Railway
Railway
stations in BeninReferences[edit]^ "World Gazetteer". Archived from the original on January 11, 2013.  ^ "Save". Atlas Monographique des Communes du Benin. Retrieved January 5, 2010.  ^ "Communes of Benin". Statoids
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Ohori People
The Ohori (sometimes called Ije) are a subgroup of the Yoruba people of West Africa. The local domain of the Ohori is South-eastern Benin north of Pobè
Pobè
town. Often, Ohoris, together with groups of Ifonyis, Aworis and Ketus are known collectively as 'Nagos" in Benin.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Dialect 4 ReferencesGeography[edit] Ohori areas are bound by various Yoruba subgroups to the North, East and South. Egbados (Yewas) are to be found towards the East, the Ifonyis bound them to the South, while to their Northern boundary are the Ketus. They are bounded by the Gbe speaking Fon/Mahi group towards the West.[1] History[edit] The Ohori natural environment is a naturally swampy/marshy waterlogged depression (Kumi swamp) with what could be described as adverse physical conditions, therefore the area had historically been a safe haven for people fleeing persecution from the larger entities of Ketu, Oyo and others
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Euphorbia
Chamaesyce Esula Euphorbia Rhizanthium and see belowDiversityc. 2008 speciesSynonymsChamaesyce Elaeophorbia Endadenium Monadenium Synadenium Pedilanthus Euphorbia
Euphorbia
as a small tree: Euphorbia
Euphorbia
dendroides Euphorbia
Euphorbia
is a very large and diverse genus of flowering plants, commonly called spurge, in the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae). "Euphorbia" is sometimes used in ordinary English to collectively refer to all members of Euphorbiaceae
Euphorbiaceae
(in deference to the type genus), not just to members of the genus.[1] Some euphorbias are commercially widely available, such as poinsettias at Christmas. Some are commonly cultivated as ornamentals, or collected and highly valued for the aesthetic appearance of their unique floral structures, such as the crown of thorns plant ( Euphorbia
Euphorbia
milii)
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Genus
A genus (/ˈdʒiːnəs/, pl. genera /ˈdʒɛnərə/) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.E.g. Felis catus
Felis catus
and Felis silvestris
Felis silvestris
are two species within the genus Felis. Felis
Felis
is a genus within the family Felidae.The composition of a genus is determined by a taxonomist. The standards for genus classification are not strictly codified, so different authorities often produce different classifications for genera
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Hawaiian (language)
The Hawaiian language (Hawaiian: ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi, pronounced [ʔoːˈlɛlo həˈvɐjʔi])[4] is a Polynesian language that takes its name from Hawaiʻi, the largest island in the tropical North Pacific archipelago where it developed. Hawaiian, along with English, is an official language of the State of Hawaii. King Kamehameha III established the first Hawaiian-language constitution in 1839 and 1840. For various reasons, including territorial legislation establishing English as the official language in schools, the number of native speakers of Hawaiian gradually decreased during the period from the 1830s to the 1950s. Hawaiian was essentially displaced by English on six of seven inhabited islands. In 2001, native speakers of Hawaiian amounted to under 0.1% of the statewide population
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Glottal Stop
The glottal stop is a type of consonantal sound used in many spoken languages, produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract or, more precisely, the glottis. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨ʔ⟩. Using IPA, this sound is known as a glottal plosive. As a result of the obstruction of the airflow in the glottis, the glottal vibration either stops or becomes irregular with a low rate and sudden drop in intensity.[1]Contents1 Features 2 Writing 3 Occurrence 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyFeatures[edit] Features of the glottal stop:[citation needed]Its manner of articulation is occlusive, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract
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Islam
Islam
Islam
(/ˈɪslɑːm/)[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God
God
(Allah)[1] and that Muhammad
Muhammad
is the messenger of God.[2][3] It is the world's second-largest religion[4] and the fastest-growing major religion in the world,[5][6][7] with over 1.8 billion followers or 24.1% of the global population,[8] known as Muslims.[9] Muslims make up a majority of the population in 50 countries.[4] Islam
Islam
teaches that God
God
is merciful, all-powerful, unique[10] and has guided mankind through prophets, revealed scriptures and natural signs.[3][11] The primary scriptures of Islam
Islam
are the Quran, viewed by Muslims as the verbatim word of God, and the teachings and normative example (called the sunnah, composed of accounts called hadith) of Muhammad
Muhammad
(c
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