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Aircrew Brevet
An aircrew brevet (officially known as an aircrew badge) is the badge worn on the left breast, above any medal ribbons, by qualified aircrew in the Royal Air Force, British Army, Indian Air Force, Pakistan Air Force, Royal Canadian Air Force, Australian Army, Royal Australian Air Force, Royal New Zealand Air Force, South African Air Force
South African Air Force
and Sri Lanka Air Force.Contents1 United Kingdom1.1 Royal Air Force1.1.1 Previous brevets1.2 Royal Navy 1.3 British Army2 Australia 3 New Zealand 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksUnited Kingdom[edit] Royal Air Force[edit] Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
pilot brevetIn the RAF, the aircrew brevet, commonly referred to as wings, is awarded upon the completion of a significant stage of flying training. Aircrew
Aircrew
first undertake Elementary Flying Training, and are then streamed to either fast jet, helicopter or multi-engine pipelines
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Air Steward
Flight attendants or cabin crew (also known as stewards/stewardesses, air hosts/hostesses, cabin attendants) are members of an aircrew employed by airlines primarily to ensure the safety and comfort of passengers aboard commercial flights, on select business jet aircraft,[1] and on some military aircraft.[2]Contents1 History 2 Overview2.1 Responsibilities2.1.1 Cabin chimes and overhead panel lights2.2 Chief Purser 2.3 Purser3 Qualifications3.1 Training 3.2 Language 3.3 Height and weight4 Uniforms and presentation 5 In advertising 6 Unions6.1 Discrimination7 Roles in emergencies7.1 September 11, 2001 7.2 Other emergencies8 In popular culture 9 Notable flight attendants 10 Gallery 11 See also 12 References 13 Further reading 14 External linksHistory[edit]Dutch flight attendants, Istanbul, 1959The role of a flight attendant derives from that of similar positions on passenger ships or p
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750 Naval Air Squadron
RNAS St Merryn 1937-1956 RNAS CuldroseMotto(s) "Teach and Strike"Equipment Beechcraft Avenger T.1CommandersCurrent commander Lt Cdr C Newby RNCeremonial chief HRH Queen Elizabeth II"Royal Navy Observer School" redirects hereThe Royal Navy Observer School grew out of HM Naval Seaplane Training School at RNAS Lee-on-Solent as a result of a series of changes of identity and parent unit. From 1918 until 1939 the Royal Air Force was responsible for naval aviation, including training and provision of aircrew to the Royal Navy. With the return of naval aviation to the Royal Navy on 24 May 1939, the Observer School was established as 750 Naval Air Squadron of the Fleet Air Arm. During World War II the squadron moved to Trinidad to continue training aircrew. It was temporarily disbanded in October 1945
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Navigator
A navigator is the person on board a ship or aircraft responsible for its navigation.[1] The navigator's primary responsibility is to be aware of ship or aircraft position at all times. Responsibilities include planning the journey, advising the ship's captain or aircraft commander of estimated timing to destinations while en route, and ensuring hazards are avoided
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Air Gunner
An air gunner (AG) also known as aerial gunner is a member of an air force aircrew who operates flexible-mount or turret-mounted machine guns or autocannons in an aircraft. Modern aircraft weapons are usually operated automatically without the need for a dedicated air gunner, but older ( World War II
World War II
and earlier) generation bombers used to carry up to eight air gunners. Most modern air gunners are helicopter door gunners, who typically have other primary roles such as crew chief or observer in addition to their air gunner role. Others fly as members of aircrews on gunships where their duties can include loading ammunition into guns and can manually fire the guns if computer systems fail. See also[edit]Book: Aviation Aircrew
Aircrew
(Flight crew) Door gunner Tail gunner Nose gunnerThis military aviation article is a stub
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Meteorology
Atmospheric physics Atmospheric dynamics (category) Atmospheric chemistry
Atmospheric chemistry
(category)Meteorology Weather
Weather
(category) · (portal) Tropical cyclone
Tropical cyclone
(category)Climatology Climate
Climate
(category) Climate
Climate
change (category) Global warming
Global warming
(category) · (portal)v t e Meteorology
Meteorology
is a branch of the atmospheric sciences which includes atmospheric chemistry and atmospheric physics, with a major focus on weather forecasting. The study of meteorology dates back millennia, though significant progress in meteorology did not occur until the 18th century. The 19th century saw modest progress in the field after weather observation networks were formed across broad regions. Prior attempts at prediction of weather depended on historical data
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Quartermaster
Quartermaster
Quartermaster
is a military or naval term, the meaning of which depends on the country and service. In land armies, a quartermaster is generally a relatively senior soldier who supervises stores and distributes supplies and provisions. In many navies, quartermaster is a non-commissioned officer (petty officer) rank. In some navies, it is not a rank but a role related to navigation. The term appears to derive from the title of a German royal official, the Quartiermeister. This term meant "master of quarters" (where "quarters" means lodging/accommodation). Or it could have been derived from "master of the quarterdeck" where the helmsman and Captain controlled the ship. The term was then adopted by some European armies and navies. The first use in English was as a naval term, entering English via the equivalent French and Dutch naval titles quartier-maître and kwartier-meester in the fifteenth century
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Signaller
A signaller in the armed forces is a specialist soldier, seaman or airman responsible for military communications. Signallers, a.k.a. Combat Signallers or signalmen or women, are commonly employed as radio or telephone operators, relaying messages for field commanders at the front line (Army units, Ships or Aircraft), through a chain of command which includes field headquarters and ultimately governments and non government organisations. Messages are transmitted and received via a communications infrastructure comprising fixed and mobile installations.Contents1 Duties 2 Air Forces 3 Armies3.1 Australia 3.2 Canada 3.3 United Kingdom4 See also 5 ReferencesDuties[edit] In the past, signalling skills have included the use of: Heliograph, Aldis lamp, semaphore flags, "Don R" (Dispatch Riders) and even carrier pigeons. Modern signallers are responsible for the battlefield voice and data communication and information technology infrastructure, using a variety of media
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Royal Navy
The Royal Navy
Navy
(RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service. From the middle decades of the 17th century, and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century, it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
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Fleet Air Arm
1914 (As the Royal Naval Air Service) 1924 (as the naval branch of the Royal Air Force) 1937 (as part of Naval Service)CountryAllegiance Queen Elizabeth IIBranch  Royal NavySize 5,000 personnel Approx
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RNAS Culdrose
Royal Naval Air Station Culdrose (RNAS Culdrose, also known as HMS Seahawk; ICAO: EGDR) is a Royal Navy
Royal Navy
airbase near Helston
Helston
on the
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UAV
An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), commonly known as a drone, is an aircraft without a human pilot aboard. UAVs are a component of an unmanned aircraft system (UAS); which include a UAV, a ground-based controller, and a system of communications between the two. The flight of UAVs may operate with various degrees of autonomy: either under remote control by a human operator or autonomously by onboard computers.[1] Compared to manned aircraft, UAVs were originally used for missions too "dull, dirty or dangerous"[2] for humans. While they originated mostly in military applications, their use is rapidly expanding to commercial, scientific, recreational, agricultural, and other applications,[3] such as policing, peacekeeping,[4] and surveillance, product deliveries, aerial photography, agriculture, smuggling,[5] and drone racing
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AAC Middle Wallop
AAC Middle Wallop is a British Army base near the Hampshire village of Middle Wallop. The base hosts 2 Regiment Army Air Corps and 7 Regiment AAC under the umbrella of the Army Aviation Centre. The role of 2 Regiment is ground training and the role of 7 Regiment is Aircrew training, AAC Middle Wallop is the base where most Army Air Corps pilots begin their careers. The base was previously under Royal Air Force control and it was then known as RAF Middle Wallop.Contents1 History1.1 Early use 1.2 USAAF use 1.3 RAF/RNAS use 1.4 Army Air Corps use2 Operational units2.1 British Army3 In Literature 4 References4.1 Citations 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksHistory[edit] Early use[edit] The base was opened as RAF Middle Wallop, a training school for new pilots in 1940. It was originally intended for bomber use, however with the Battle of Britain being fought, No. 609 Squadron RAF, flying the Supermarine Spitfire, and No
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AgustaWestland Apache
The AgustaWestland
AgustaWestland
Apache is a licence-built version of the Boeing AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopter for the British Army's Army Air Corps. The first eight helicopters were built by Boeing; the remaining 59 were assembled by Westland Helicopters
Westland Helicopters
(now part of Leonardo) at Yeovil, Somerset
Somerset
in England from Boeing-supplied kits. Changes from the AH-64D include Rolls-Royce Turbomeca
Rolls-Royce Turbomeca
engines, a new electronic defensive aids suite and a folding blade mechanism allowing the British version to operate from ships
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AgustaWestland AW159 Wildcat
The AgustaWestland
AgustaWestland
AW159 Wildcat (previously called the Future Lynx and Lynx Wildcat) is an improved version of the Westland Super Lynx military helicopter designed to serve in the battlefield utility, search and rescue and anti-surface warfare roles. In British service, common variants are being operated by both the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and British Army to replace their Lynx Mk.7/8/9 rotorcraft
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