HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Aircraft Engine
An aircraft engine is the component of the propulsion system for an aircraft that generates mechanical power
[...More...]

"Aircraft Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gas Turbine
A gas turbine, also called a combustion turbine, is a type of continuous combustion, internal combustion engine. There are three main components:An upstream rotating gas compressor; A downstream turbine on the same shaft; A combustion chamber or area, called a combustor, in between 1. and 2. above.A fourth component is often used to increase efficiency (turboprop, turbofan), to convert power into mechanical or electric form (turboshaft, electric generator), or to achieve greater power to mass/volume ratio (afterburner). The basic operation of the gas turbine is a Brayton cycle
Brayton cycle
with air as the working fluid. Fresh atmospheric air flows through the compressor that brings it to higher pressure. Energy
Energy
is then added by spraying fuel into the air and igniting it so the combustion generates a high-temperature flow
[...More...]

"Gas Turbine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

UAV
An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), commonly known as a drone, is an aircraft without a human pilot aboard. UAVs are a component of an unmanned aircraft system (UAS); which include a UAV, a ground-based controller, and a system of communications between the two. The flight of UAVs may operate with various degrees of autonomy: either under remote control by a human operator or autonomously by onboard computers.[1] Compared to manned aircraft, UAVs were originally used for missions too "dull, dirty or dangerous"[2] for humans. While they originated mostly in military applications, their use is rapidly expanding to commercial, scientific, recreational, agricultural, and other applications,[3] such as policing, peacekeeping,[4] and surveillance, product deliveries, aerial photography, agriculture, smuggling,[5] and drone racing
[...More...]

"UAV" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Drive Shaft
A drive shaft, driveshaft, driving shaft, propeller shaft (prop shaft), or Cardan shaft is a mechanical component for transmitting torque and rotation, usually used to connect other components of a drive train that cannot be connected directly because of distance or the need to allow for relative movement between them. As torque carriers, drive shafts are subject to torsion and shear stress, equivalent to the difference between the input torque and the load
[...More...]

"Drive Shaft" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nuclear-powered Aircraft
A nuclear-powered aircraft is a concept for an aircraft intended to be powered by nuclear energy. The intention was to produce a jet engine that would heat compressed air with heat from fission, instead of heat from burning fuel
[...More...]

"Nuclear-powered Aircraft" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Helicopter Rotor
A helicopter main rotor or rotor system is the combination of several rotary wings (rotor blades) and a control system that generates the aerodynamic lift force that supports the weight of the helicopter, and the thrust that counteracts aerodynamic drag in forward flight. Each main rotor is mounted on a vertical mast over the top of the helicopter, as opposed to a helicopter tail rotor, which connects through a combination of drive shaft(s) and gearboxes along the tail boom. The blade pitch is typically controlled by a swashplate connected to the helicopter flight controls. Helicopters are one example of rotary-wing aircraft (rotorcraft)
[...More...]

"Helicopter Rotor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Multicopter
A multirotor[1] or multicopter is a rotorcraft with more than two rotors. An advantage of multirotor aircraft is the simpler rotor mechanics required for flight control
[...More...]

"Multicopter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Inline Engine (aviation)
In aviation, an inline engine is a reciprocating engine with banks of cylinders, one behind another, rather than rows of cylinders, with each bank having any number of cylinders, but rarely more than six. Inline engine configurations[edit]Straight or Inline Engines with a single bank of cylinders which can be arranged at any angle but typically upright or inverted, (e.g. upright ADC Cirrus, inverted de Havilland Gipsy Major).V Engines with two banks of cylinders with less than 180° between them driving a common crankshaft, typically arranged upright or inverted (e.g. upright Liberty L-12, inverted Argus As 410).[1][2]A W-12 Napier Lion
Napier Lion
engineO or Horizontally Opposed Engines with two banks of cylinders arranged at 180° to each other driving a common crankshaft, almost universally mounted with banks horizontal for aircraft use, or with crankshaft vertical for helicopter use, (e.g
[...More...]

"Inline Engine (aviation)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Reciprocating Engine
A reciprocating engine, also often known as a piston engine, is typically a heat engine (although there are also pneumatic and hydraulic reciprocating engines) that uses one or more reciprocating pistons to convert pressure into a rotating motion. This article describes the common features of all types. The main types are: the internal combustion engine, used extensively in motor vehicles; the steam engine, the mainstay of the Industrial Revolution; and the niche application Stirling engine
[...More...]

"Reciprocating Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charlie Taylor (mechanic)
Charles Edward Taylor (May 24, 1868 – January 30, 1956) was an American inventor, mechanic and machinist. He built the first aircraft engine used by the Wright brothers
Wright brothers
and was a vital contributor of mechanical skills in the building and maintaining of early Wright engines and airplanes.[1][2]Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksBiography[edit] Born in a log cabin on May 24, 1868, in Cerro Gordo, Illinois
Cerro Gordo, Illinois
to William Stephen Taylor and Mary Jane Germain.[1] Taylor worked as a binder at the Nebraska State Journal at age 12. He became a tool maker. At 24, he met and married Henrietta Webbert, who was from Dayton, Ohio. They had a child and moved to Dayton, where prospects were better. Stoddard Manufacturing Co. hired him to make farm machinery and bicycles
[...More...]

"Charlie Taylor (mechanic)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Reaction Engine
A reaction engine is an engine or motor that produces thrust by expelling reaction mass, in accordance with Newton's third law of motion. This law of motion is most commonly paraphrased as: "For every action force there is an equal, but opposite, reaction force." Examples include jet engines, rocket engines, and more uncommon variations such as Hall effect thrusters, ion drives, mass drivers, and nuclear pulse propulsion.Contents1 Energy use1.1 Propulsive efficiency 1.2 Cycle efficiency 1.3 Oberth effect2 Types of reaction engines 3 See also 4 Notes and references 5 External linksEnergy use[edit] Propulsive efficiency[edit] Main article: propulsive efficiency For all reaction engines that carry on-board propellant (such as rocket engines and electric propulsion drives) some energy must go into accelerating the reaction mass
[...More...]

"Reaction Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Stringfellow
John Stringfellow
John Stringfellow
(1799 – 13 December 1883) was born in Sheffield, England
England
and is known for his work on the Aerial Steam Carriage
Aerial Steam Carriage
with William Samuel Henson. Stringfellow worked in Chard, Somerset, England
England
as a maker of bobbins and carriages for the lace industry. Together with Henson, he had ambitions of creating an international company, the Aerial Transit Company, with designs showing aeroplane travel in exotic locations like Egypt and China. Despite their efforts, the designs were flawed with Stringfellow's ideas centred on monoplane and triplane models and Henson's ideas centred on an underpowered steam-powered vehicle. In 1848 Stringfellow achieved the first powered flight using an unmanned 10 ft wingspan steam-powered monoplane built in a disused lace factory in Chard, Somerset
[...More...]

"John Stringfellow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Timeline Of Jet Power
This article outlines the important developments in the history of the development of the air-breathing (duct) jet engine. Although the most common type, the gas turbine powered jet engine, was certainly a 20th-century invention, many of the needed advances in theory and technology leading to this invention were made well before this time. The jet engine was clearly an idea whose time had come. Frank Whittle submitted his first patent in 1930. By the late 1930s there were six teams chasing development, three in Germany, two in the UK and one in Hungary. By 1942 they had been joined by another half dozen British companies, three more in the United States based on British technology, and early efforts in the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and Japan based on British and German designs respectively
[...More...]

"Timeline Of Jet Power" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

External Combustion Engine
An external combustion engine (EC engine) is a heat engine where a working fluid, contained internally, is heated by combustion in an external source, through the engine wall or a heat exchanger. The fluid then, by expanding and acting on the mechanism of the engine, produces motion and usable work.[1] The fluid is then cooled, compressed and reused (closed cycle), or (less commonly) dumped, and cool fluid pulled in (open cycle air engine).Contents1 Combustion 2 Working fluid2.1 Single phase 2.2 Dual phase3 See also 4 ReferencesCombustion[edit] "Combustion" refers to burning fuel with an oxidizer, to supply the heat
[...More...]

"External Combustion Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Air Propulsion
Propulsion
Propulsion
means to push forward or drive an object forward .[1] The term is derived from two Latin words: pro, meaning before or forward; and pellere, meaning to drive.[2] A propulsion system consists of a source of mechanical power, and a propulsor (means of converting this power into propulsive force). A technological system uses an engine or motor as the power source (commonly called a powerplant), and wheels and axles, propellers, or a propulsive nozzle to generate the force
[...More...]

"Air Propulsion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.