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Airco DH.9
Royal Naval Air Service South African Air ForceNumber built 4,091Variants Airco
Airco
DH.9A Airco
Airco
DH.9C Westland WalrusThe Airco
Airco
DH.9 (from de Havilland 9) – also known after 1920 as the de Havilland DH.9 – was a British single-engined biplane bomber developed and deployed during the First World War. The DH.9 was a development of Airco's earlier successful DH.4, with which it shared many components. These were mated to an all-new fuselage and the BHP/Galloway Adriatic engine, which promised increased performance. Anticipating its usefulness, the type was ordered in very large numbers for Britain's Royal Flying Corps
Royal Flying Corps
(RFC). Upon entering service, the DH.9's performance was found to be unsatisfactory
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Bomber
A bomber is a combat aircraft designed to attack ground and naval targets by dropping air-to-ground weaponry (such as bombs), firing torpedoes and bullets or deploying air-launched cruise missiles.Contents1 Classification1.1 Strategic 1.2 Tactical2 History2.1 The first bombers 2.2 Strategic bombing 2.3 World War II 2.4 Cold War 2.5 Modern era3 See also 4 References 5 External linksClassification[edit]A Russian Tupolev Tu-160
Tupolev Tu-160
strategic bomber.Strategic[edit] Further information: Carpet bombing
Carpet bombing
and Strategic bomber Strategic bombing
Strategic bombing
is done by heavy bombers primarily designed for long-range bombing missions against strategic targets such as supply bases, bridges, factories, shipyards, and cities themselves, in order to diminish the enemy's ability to wage war by limiting access to resources through crippling infrastructure or reducing industrial output
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Bomb
A bomb is an explosive weapon that uses the exothermic reaction of an explosive material to provide an extremely sudden and violent release of energy. Detonations inflict damage principally through ground- and atmosphere-transmitted mechanical stress, the impact and penetration of pressure-driven projectiles, pressure damage, and explosion-generated effects.[1] Bombs have been in use since the 11th century in Song Dynasty
Song Dynasty
China.[2] The term bomb is not usually applied to explosive devices used for civilian purposes such as construction or mining, although the people using the devices may sometimes refer to them as a "bomb". The military use of the term "bomb", or more specifically aerial bomb action, typically refers to airdropped, unpowered explosive weapons most commonly used by air forces and naval aviation
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Colindale
Colindale
Colindale
is an area which lies mainly within the London Borough of Barnet, although the western side of Colindale's main shopping street is within the London Borough of Brent. Colindale
Colindale
is an area of suburban character. It is situated about eight miles (12.9 km) north west of Charing Cross.Contents1 History 2 Today 3 Demography 4 Geography 5 Economy 6 Transport 7 Development7.1 Transport development8 Image gallery 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Formerly in the borough and ancient parish of Hendon, the area was essentially the dale between Mill Hill
Mill Hill
and The Burroughs. By the middle of the 20th century, it had come to include that part of the Edgware
Edgware
Road between The Hyde
The Hyde
and Burnt Oak. The area is named after a 16th-century family of the same name
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RAF Martlesham Heath
Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
Station Martlesham Heath
Martlesham Heath
or more simply RAF Martlesham Heath is a former Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
station located 1.5 miles (2.4 km) south west of Woodbridge, Suffolk, England. It was active between 1917 and 1963, and played an important role in the development of Airborne Interception radar.Contents1 History1.1 RFC/RAF prewar use 1.2 RAF Fighter Command
RAF Fighter Command
use 1.3 USAAF use1.3.1 356th Fighter Group1.4 Postwar RAF Fighter Command
RAF Fighter Command
use2 Current use 3 See also 4 References4.1 Citations 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksHistory[edit] RFC/RAF prewar use[edit] Martlesham Heath
Martlesham Heath
was first used as a Royal Flying Corps
Royal Flying Corps
airfield during World War I
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Hugh Trenchard, 1st Viscount Trenchard
Marshal of the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
Hugh Montague Trenchard, 1st Viscount Trenchard, GCB, OM, GCVO, DSO (3 February 1873 – 10 February 1956) was a British officer who was instrumental in establishing the Royal Air Force. He has been described as the Father of the Royal Air Force. During his formative years Trenchard struggled academically, failing many examinations and only just succeeding in meeting the minimum standard for commissioned service in the British Army. As a young infantry officer, Trenchard served in India
India
and with the outbreak of the Boer
Boer
War, he volunteered for service in South Africa. While fighting the Boers, Trenchard was critically wounded and as a result of his injury, he lost a lung, was partially paralysed and returned to Great Britain
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Secretary Of State For Air
The Secretary of State for Air
Secretary of State for Air
was a cabinet-level British position. The person holding this position was in charge of the Air Ministry. It was created on 10 January 1919 to manage the Royal Air Force
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William Weir, 1st Viscount Weir
William Douglas Weir, 1st Viscount Weir GCB PC (12 May 1877 – 2 July 1959) was a Scottish industrialist and politician, who served as President of the Air Council in 1918.Contents1 Early life 2 Industrialist 3 Public servant 4 Family life 5 Styles of address and honours5.1 Styles of address 5.2 Honours6 Archives 7 See also 8 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Weir was born in Glasgow
Glasgow
in 1877, the eldest child of James Weir (1842/3–1920) and his wife, Mary Richmond (1848–1931). He attended Allan Glen's School
Allan Glen's School
and the High School of Glasgow
Glasgow
before entering an apprenticeship in the business established by his father and his uncle, G. and J. Weir, manufacturers of condensers, pumps, and evaporators. His brother was J S Weir[1][2] Industrialist[edit] Weir rose to become a director of G. and J
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Flight Altitude Record
This listing of flight altitude records are the records set for the highest aeronautical flights conducted in the atmosphere, set since the age of ballooning. Some, but not all of the records were certified by the non-profit international aviation organization, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI). One reason for a lack of 'official' certification was that the flight occurred prior to the creation of the FAI.[1] For clarity, the "Fixed-wing aircraft" table is sorted by FAI-designated categories as determined by whether the record-creating aircraft left the ground by its own power (category "Altitude"), or whether it was first carried aloft by a carrier-aircraft prior to its record setting event (category "Altitude gain", or formally "Altitude Gain, Aeroplane Launched from a Carrier Aircraft")
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Plywood
Plywood
Plywood
is a sheet material manufactured from thin layers or "plies" of wood veneer that are glued together with adjacent layers having their wood grain rotated up to 90 degrees to one another. It is an engineered wood from the family of manufactured boards which includes medium-density fibreboard (MDF) and particle board (chipboard). All plywoods bind resin and wood fibre sheets (cellulose cells are long, strong and thin) to form a composite material. This alternation of the grain is called cross-graining and has several important benefits: it reduces the tendency of wood to split when nailed in at the edges; it reduces expansion and shrinkage, providing improved dimensional stability; and it makes the strength of the panel consistent across all directions. There is usually an odd number of plies, so that the sheet is balanced—this reduces warping
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Box Girder
A box or tubular girder is a girder that forms an enclosed tube with multiple walls, rather than an I or H-beam. Originally constructed of riveted wrought iron, they are now found in rolled or welded steel, aluminium extrusions or prestressed concrete. Compared to an I-beam, the advantage of a box girder is that it better resists torsion. Having multiple vertical webs, it can also carry more load than an I-beam
I-beam
of equal height (although it will use more material than a taller I-beam
I-beam
of equivalent capacity). The distinction in naming between a box girder and a tubular girder is imprecise. Generally the term box girder is used, especially if it is rectangular in section
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Bombsight
A bombsight is a device used by military aircraft to accurately drop bombs. Bombsights are a feature of combat aircraft from World War I on, first found on purpose-designed bomber aircraft, and then moving to fighter-bombers and modern tactical aircraft as these aircraft took up the brunt of the bombing role. A bombsight has to estimate the path the bomb will take after release from the aircraft. The two primary forces during its fall are gravity and air drag, which make the path of the bomb through the air roughly parabolic. There are additional factors such as changes in air density and wind that may be considered, but these are only a concern for bombs that spend a significant portion of a minute falling through the air. These effects can be minimized by reducing the fall time through low-level bombing or by increasing the speed of the bombs. These effects are combined in the dive bomber
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Piston Engine
A reciprocating engine, also often known as a piston engine, is typically a heat engine (although there are also pneumatic and hydraulic reciprocating engines) that uses one or more reciprocating pistons to convert pressure into a rotating motion. This article describes the common features of all types. The main types are: the internal combustion engine, used extensively in motor vehicles; the steam engine, the mainstay of the Industrial Revolution; and the niche application Stirling engine
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Radio
Radio
Radio
is the technology of using radio waves to carry information, such as sound, by systematically modulating properties of electromagnetic energy waves transmitted through space, such as their amplitude, frequency, phase, or pulse width.[n 1] When radio waves strike an electrical conductor, the oscillating fields induce an alternating current in the conductor. The information in the waves can be extracted and transformed back into its original form. Radio
Radio
systems need a transmitter to modulate (change) some property of the energy produced to impress a signal on it, for example using amplitude modulation or angle modulation (which can be frequency modulation or phase modulation). Radio
Radio
systems also need an antenna to convert electric currents into radio waves, and radio waves into an electric current. An antenna can be used for both transmitting and receiving
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Camera
A camera is an optical instrument for recording or capturing images, which may be stored locally, transmitted to another location, or both. The images may be individual still photographs or sequences of images constituting videos or movies. The camera is a remote sensing device as it senses subjects without any contact . The word camera comes from camera obscura, which means "dark chamber" and is the Latin
Latin
name of the original device for projecting an image of external reality onto a flat surface. The modern photographic camera evolved from the camera obscura. The functioning of the camera is very similar to the functioning of the human eye
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Aircraft Dope
Aircraft
Aircraft
dope is a plasticised lacquer that is applied to fabric-covered aircraft (both full-size and flying models[1]). It tightens and stiffens fabric stretched over airframes, which renders them airtight and weatherproof.[2] Typical doping agents include nitrocellulose, cellulose acetate and cellulose acetate butyrate. Liquid dopes are highly flammable; nitrocellulose, for instance, is also known as the explosive propellant "guncotton"
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