HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ahaggar National Park
The Hoggar Mountains
Hoggar Mountains
(Arabic: جبال هقار‎, Berber: idurar n Ahaggar, Tuareg: Idurar Uhaggar), also known as the Ahaggar Mountains, are a highland region in the central Sahara, southern Algeria, along the Tropic of Cancer. The mountains cover an area of approximately 550,000 square km (212,000 square miles).[1]Contents1 Geography 2 Environment2.1 Fauna and flora3 Cultural significance 4 Panoramic view 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksGeography[edit]An oasis in the Hoggar MountainsThis mountainous region is located about 1,500 km (930 mi) south of the capital, Algiers. The area is largely rocky desert with an average elevation of more than 900 m (3,000 ft) above sea level
[...More...]

"Ahaggar National Park" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ecoregion
An ecoregion (ecological region) is an ecologically and geographically defined area that is smaller than a bioregion, which in turn is smaller than an ecozone. All three of these are either less or greater than an ecosystem.[citation needed][clarification needed] Ecoregions cover relatively large areas of land or water, and contain characteristic, geographically distinct assemblages of natural communities and species. The biodiversity of flora, fauna and ecosystems that characterise an ecoregion tends to be distinct from that of other ecoregions. In theory, biodiversity or conservation ecoregions are relatively large areas of land or water where the probability of encountering different species and communities at any given point remains relatively constant, within an acceptable range of variation (largely undefined at this point). Three caveats are appropriate for all bio-geographic mapping approaches. Firstly, no single bio-geographic framework is optimal for all taxa
[...More...]

"Ecoregion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dorcas Gazelle
The dorcas gazelle ( Gazella
Gazella
dorcas), also known as the ariel gazelle, is a small and common gazelle. The dorcas gazelle stands about 55–65 cm (1.8-2.1 ft) at the shoulder, with a head and body length of 90–110 cm (3-3.6 ft) and a weight of 15–20 kg (33-44 lb). The numerous subspecies survive on vegetation in grassland, steppe, wadis, mountain desert and in semidesert climates of Africa
Africa
and Arabia. About 35,000 - 40,000 exist in the wild. The extinct Saudi gazelle
Saudi gazelle
from the Arabian Peninsula
Arabian Peninsula
has been previously considered as a subspecies of the dorcas gazelle.Contents1 Taxonomy and evolution 2 Description 3 Behaviour 4 Breeding 5 Threats 6 Trade 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksTaxonomy and evolution[edit] The scientific name of the dorcas gazelle is Gazella
Gazella
dorcas
[...More...]

"Dorcas Gazelle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mount Tahat
Mount Tahat
Mount Tahat
(Arabic: جبل تاهات‎) is the highest mountain peak in Algeria. It sits at an elevation of 2,908 metres (9,541 ft).[1][2] Tahat is also the highest peak in the Hoggar Mountains. Its nearest city is Tamanrasset
Tamanrasset
which is located 56 km to the south. Mount Tahat
Mount Tahat
is of volcanic origin. It is located in an arid, rocky high plateau area of the central Sahara Desert. The Tuareg inhabit this region. To the north lie the Tassili n'Ajjer
Tassili n'Ajjer
mountains, which contain cave paintings dating from a period between 8000 and 2000 BC. The rock art is pastoral, showing cattle breeding and hunting of animals that are today exclusively found in the southern Sahara's climate.Mount Tahat, AlgeriaSee also[edit]List of Ultras of AfricaReferences[edit]^ a b c "Africa Ultra-Prominences" Peaklist.org
[...More...]

"Mount Tahat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Morocco
Coordinates: 32°N 6°W / 32°N 6°W / 32; -6Kingdom of Moroccoالمملكة المغربية (Arabic) ⵜⴰⴳⵍⴷⵉⵜ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ (Berber)FlagCoat of armsMotto:  لله، الوطن، الملك  (Arabic) Allah, Al Watan, Al Malik ⴰⴽⵓⵛ, ⴰⵎⵓⵔ, ⴰⴳⵍⵍⵉⴷ (Berber)"God, Homeland, King"Anthem:  النشيد الوطني المغربي  (Arabic) ⵉⵣⵍⵉ ⴰⵏⴰⵎⵓⵔ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ  (Berber) Cherifian AnthemDark green: Internationally recognized territory of Morocco. Lighter green: Western Sahara, a territory claimed and mostly controlled by Morocco
[...More...]

"Morocco" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Painted Hunting Dog
The African wild dog
African wild dog
(Lycaon pictus), also known as African hunting dog, African painted dog, painted hunting dog or painted wolf, is a canid native to Sub-Saharan Africa. It is the largest of its family in Africa, and the only extant member of the genus Lycaon, which is distinguished from Canis
Canis
by its fewer toes and its dentition, which is highly specialised for a hypercarnivorous diet. It is classified as endangered by the IUCN, as it has disappeared from much of its original range. The current population has been estimated at roughly 39 subpopulations containing 6,600 adults, only 1,400 of which are fully grown.[2] The decline of these populations is ongoing, due to habitat fragmentation, human persecution, and disease outbreaks. The African wild dog
African wild dog
is a highly social animal, living in packs with separate dominance hierarchies for males and females
[...More...]

"Painted Hunting Dog" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Local Extinction
Local extinction
Local extinction
or extirpation is the condition of a species (or other taxon) that ceases to exist in the chosen geographic area of study, though it still exists elsewhere.[1] Local extinctions are contrasted with global extinctions. Local extinctions may be followed by a replacement of the species taken from other locations; wolf reintroduction is an example of this.Contents1 Conservation 2 IUCN subpopulation and stock assessments 3 Local extinction
Local extinction
events 4 See also 5 ReferencesConservation[edit] Local extinctions mark a change in the ecology of an area. The area of study chosen may reflect a natural subpopulation, political boundaries, or both. The Cetacean Specialist Group of the IUCN has assessed the threat of a local extinction of the Black Sea stock of Harbour Porpoise
Harbour Porpoise
(Phocoena phocoena) that touches six different countries
[...More...]

"Local Extinction" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tafilalt
Tafilalt
Tafilalt
or Tafilet (Berber: Tafilalt, ⵜⴰⴼⵉⵍⴰⵍⵜ; Arabic: تافيلالت‎), historically Sijilmasa, is a region and the largest oasis in Morocco.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Geography 4 Notable residents 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The word "Tafilalt" is an Amazigh word and it means "Jug", which is specifically a pottery jar used to store water.[2] History[edit] In the area, the town of Siji
[...More...]

"Tafilalt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

West African Crocodile
The West African crocodile[1] or desert crocodile ( Crocodylus
Crocodylus
suchus) is a species of crocodile related to – and often confused with – the larger and more aggressive Nile crocodile
Nile crocodile
(C. niloticus).[2][3]Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Relationship with humans3.1 In Ancient Egypt 3.2 In captivity4 ReferencesTaxonomy[edit]Skull of a mummified specimen of C. suchus, 1870sThe species was named by Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire
Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire
in 1807, who discovered differences between the skulls of a mummified crocodile and those of Nile crocodile
Nile crocodile
(C. niloticus). This new species was, however, for a long time afterwards regarded as a synonym of the Nile crocodile. In 2003, a study indicated that C
[...More...]

"West African Crocodile" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Herbivores
A herbivore is an animal anatomically and physiologically adapted to eating plant material, for example foliage, for the main component of its diet. As a result of their plant diet, herbivorous animals typically have mouthparts adapted to rasping or grinding
[...More...]

"Herbivores" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Barbary Sheep
A. l. angusi Rothschild, 1921 A. l. blainei Rothschiild, 1913 A. l. lervia Pallas, 1777 A. l. fassini Lepri, 1930 A. l. ornatus † I. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1827 A. l. sahariensis Rothschild, 1913SynonymsAntilope lervia[2] Capra lervia[3]The Barbary
Barbary
sheep (Ammotragus lervia) is a species of caprid (goat-antelope) native to rocky mountains in North Africa. Six subspecies have been described. Although it is rare in its native North Africa, it has been introduced to North America, southern Europe, and elsewhere. It is also known as aoudad, waddan, arui, and arruis.Contents1 Description 2 Range2.1 Natural range 2.2 Introduced populations3 Taxonomy 4 Habitats 5 Names 6 Gallery 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksDescription[edit] Barbary
Barbary
sheep stand 80 to 100 cm (2.6 to 3.3 ft) tall at the shoulder and weigh 40 to 140 kg (88 to 309 lb)
[...More...]

"Barbary Sheep" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vachellia Tortilis
Vachellia
Vachellia
tortilis, widely known as Acacia tortilis but attributed by APG III to the Vachellia
Vachellia
genus,[3] is the umbrella thorn acacia, also known as umbrella thorn and Israeli babool,[4] a medium to large canopied tree native primarily to the savanna and Sahel
Sahel
of Africa (especially Sudan), but also occurring in the Middle East.Contents1 Distribution and growing conditions 2 Characteristics 3 Importance 4 Common names 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDistribution and growing conditions[edit] Vachellia
Vachellia
tortilis tends to grow in areas where temperatures vary from 0 to 50 degree Celsius
Celsius
and rainfall is anywhere from about 100–1,000 mm (3.9–39.4 in) per year.[5] Characteristics[edit] In extremely arid conditions, it may occur as a small, wiry bush
[...More...]

"Vachellia Tortilis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Relict (biology)
In biogeography and paleontology a relict is a population or taxon of organisms that was more widespread or more diverse in the past. A relictual population is a population that presently occurs in a restricted area, but whose original range was far wider during a previous geologic epoch. Similarly, a relictual taxon is a taxon (e.g. species or other lineage) that is the sole surviving representative of a formerly diverse group.[1]Contents1 Definition 2 Examples 3 Relevance 4 See also 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit] A relict (or relic) plant or animal is a taxon that persists as a remnant of what was once a diverse and widespread population. Relictualism occurs when a widespread habitat or range changes and a small area becomes cut off from the whole
[...More...]

"Relict (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vachellia Seyal
Vachellia
Vachellia
seyal, the red acacia, known also as the shittah tree (the source of shittim wood), is a thorny, 6–10 m (20–33 ft) high tree with a pale greenish or reddish bark. At the base of the 3–10 cm (1.2–3.9 in) feathery leaves there are two straight, light grey thorns, growing to 7–20 cm (2.8–7.9 in) long. The blossoms are displayed in round, bright yellow clusters approximately in 1.5 cm (0.59 in) diameter. In Vachellia
Vachellia
seyal var. fistula, which is more common on heavy clay soils, some of the thorns are swollen and house symbiotic ants.[2] It is distributed from Egypt
Egypt
to Kenya
Kenya
and west Senegal. In the Sahara, it often grows in damp valleys
[...More...]

"Vachellia Seyal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Myrtus
Myrthus Scop. Myrtus communis
Myrtus communis
- MHNTMyrtus, with the common name myrtle, is a genus of flowering plants in the family Myrtaceae, described by Linnaeus in 1753.[3] Over 600 names have been proposed in the genus, but nearly all have either been moved to other genera or been regarded as synonyms
[...More...]

"Myrtus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tamarix Aphylla
Tamarix
Tamarix
articulata Tamarix
Tamarix
aphylla is the largest known species of Tamarix
Tamarix
(height: to 18 metres–60 ft). The species has a variety of common names, including Athel tamarisk,[1] Athel tree, Athel pine, and saltcedar. It is an evergreen tree, native across North, East and Central Africa, through the Middle East, and into parts of Western and Southern Asia.Contents1 Distribution 2 Description 3 Uses 4 History 5 Chemistry 6 ReferencesDistribution[edit] Tamarix
Tamarix
aphylla is found along watercourses in arid areas. It is very resistant to saline and alkaline soils.[2] The latitudinal range ranges from 35 N to 0 N, and it ranges from Morocco and Algeria
Algeria
in North Africa eastwards to Egypt and south to the Horn of Africa and into Kenya
[...More...]

"Tamarix Aphylla" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.