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Agnosticism
Related concepts and fundamentals:Agnosticism Epistemology Presupposition Probabilityv t e Agnosticism
Agnosticism
is the view that the existence of God, of the divine or the supernatural is unknown or unknowable.[1][2][3] According to the philosopher William L. Rowe, "agnosticism is the view that human reason is incapable of providing sufficient rational grounds to justify either the belief that God
God
exists or the belief that God
God
does not exist".[2] Agnosticism
Agnosticism
is the doctrine or tenet of agnostics with regard to the existence of anything beyond and behind material phenomena or to knowledge of a First Cause or God,[4] and is not a religion. English biologist Thomas Henry Huxley
Thomas Henry Huxley
coined the word "agnostic" in 1869
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Hongjun Laozu
Hongjun Laozu (simplified Chinese: 鸿钧老祖; traditional Chinese: 鴻鈞老祖; pinyin: Hóngjūn Lǎozǔ; Wade–Giles: Hung-chün Lao-tsu) lit. "Ancestor of the Great Balance" is a deity in Chinese folk religion and Taoism, patriarch of the Three Pure Ones
Three Pure Ones
in Taoist mythology. Hongjun 鴻鈞 is a graphic variant of hungjun (simplified Chinese: 洪钧; traditional Chinese: 洪鈞; pinyin: hóngjūn; Wade–Giles: hung-chün) "primordial nature", as used in the Chinese idiom Xian you hongjun hou you tian 先有鸿钧后有天 "First there was Nature and then there was Heaven". Daoists mythologize Hongjun Laozu as the ancestor of xian "trancendents; immortals" (Werner 1922:133-134) and use the honorific name Hongyuan Laozu (simplified Chinese: 鸿元老祖; traditional Chinese: 鴻元老祖; pinyin: Hóngyuán Lǎozǔ; Wade–Giles: Hung-yuan Lao-tsu) "Great Primal Ancestor"
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Shangdi
Model humanity:Xian ZhenrenWen and wuPracticesFenxiang JingxiangFeng shui MiaohuiWu shamanismJitong mediumshipPrecious scrollsInstitutions and templesAssociations of good-doingLineage associations or churchesChinese temple Ancestral shrineChinese Folk Temples' AssociationFestivalsQingming Zhongyuan Zhongqiu Jiuhuangye Qixi Duanwu NianInternal traditions Major cultural formsChinese ancestral religionChinese communal deity religionChinese mother goddess worshipNortheast China
China
folk religionMain phi
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Creator In Buddhism
Creator in Buddhism
Buddhism
is not Gautama Buddha. Buddhist
Buddhist
thought consistently rejects the notion of a creator deity.[1][2] It teaches the concept of gods, heavens and rebirths in its Saṃsāra
Saṃsāra
doctrine, but it considers none of these gods as a creator. Buddhism
Buddhism
posits that mundane deities such as Mahabrahma are misconstrued to be a creator.[3] Buddhism
Buddhism
states that the universe is created and governed by the five cosmic laws (Niyama Dhamma), namely Utu Niyama, Bija Niyama, Kamma Niyama, Citta Niyama, and Dhamma Niyama. These cosmic laws have been seen by many as the main difference between Buddhism and other religions. Creator in Pali
Pali
is Atthi Ajatang Abhutang Akatang Asamkhatang which means "a not-born, a not-brought-to-being, a not-made, a not-conditioned"
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Mother Goddess
A mother goddess is a goddess who represents, or is a personification of nature, motherhood, fertility, creation, destruction or who embodies the bounty of the Earth. When equated with the Earth
Earth
or the natural world, such goddesses are sometimes referred to as Mother Earth
Earth
or as the Earth
Earth
Mother. There is difference of opinion between the academic and the popular conception of the term. The popular view is mainly driven by the Goddess
Goddess
movement and reads that primitive societies initially were matriarchal, worshipping a sovereign, nurturing, motherly earth goddess. This was based upon the nineteenth-century ideas of unilineal evolution of Johann Jakob Bachofen
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Tian
Model humanity:Xian ZhenrenWen and wuPracticesFenxiang JingxiangFeng shui MiaohuiWu shamanismJitong mediumshipPrecious scrollsInstitutions and templesAssociations of good-doingLineage associations or churchesChinese temple Ancestral shrineChinese Folk Temples' AssociationFestivalsQingming Zhongyuan Zhongqiu Jiuhuangye Qixi Duanwu NianInternal traditions Major cultural formsChinese ancestral religionChinese communal deity religionChinese mother goddess worshipNortheast China folk religionMain philosophical traditions: Confucianism
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God In Islam
In Islam, God
God
(Arabic: الله‎, translit. Allāh, contraction of الْإِلٰه al-ilāh, lit. "the god") is indivisible, the God, the absolute one, the all-powerful and all-knowing ruler of the universe, and the creator of everything in existence within the universe. Islam
Islam
emphasizes that God
God
is strictly singular (tawḥīd ): unique (wāḥid ), inherently One (aḥad ),[1] also all-merciful and omnipotent.[2] According to Islamic teachings, beyond the Throne[3] and according to the Quran, "No vision can grasp him, but His grasp is over all vision: He is above all comprehension, yet is acquainted with all things."[4][5] The Surat 112 Al-'Ikhlās (The Sincerity) says: "He is God, [who is] One. God, the Eternal Refuge
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Chinese Theology
Model humanity:Xian ZhenrenWen and wuPracticesFenxiang JingxiangFeng shui MiaohuiWu shamanismJitong mediumshipPrecious scrollsInstitutions and templesAssociations of good-doingLineage associations or churchesChinese temple Ancestral shrineChinese Folk Temples' AssociationFestivalsQingming Zhongyuan Zhongqiu Jiuhuangye Qixi Duanwu NianInternal traditions Major cultural formsChinese ancestral religionChinese communal deity religionChinese mother goddess worshipNortheast China folk religionMain philosophical traditions: Confucianism
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Monad (philosophy)
Monad (from Greek μονάς monas, "singularity" in turn from μόνος monos, "alone"),[1] refers in cosmogony (creation theories) to the first being, divinity, or the totality of all beings. The concept was reportedly conceived by the Pythagoreans
Pythagoreans
and may refer variously to a single source acting alone, or to an indivisible origin, or to both. The concept was later adopted by other philosophers, such as Leibniz, who referred to the monad as an elementary particle
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Tawhid
Tawhid
Tawhid
(Arabic: توحيد‎ tawḥīd, meaning "oneness [of God]” also romanized as tawheed, touheed or tevhid[1]) is the indivisible oneness concept of monotheism in Islam.[2] Tawhid
Tawhid
is the religion's central and single-most important concept, upon which a Muslim's entire faith rests
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Supreme Being
Supreme Being
Supreme Being
is a term used by theologians and philosophers of many religions, including Christianity, Islam,[1] Hinduism,[2] Judaism, Sikhism, Jainism, Deism[3] and Zoroastrianism
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God The Sustainer
God
God
the Sustainer is a theological term referring to the conception of God
God
who sustains and upholds everything in existence. Al Qayyum, sometimes rendered "The Sustainer" is one of the 99 Names of God
God
in Islam. "Creater, Sustainer, Redeemer" is reportedly a "common phrase" in Protestantism in the United States, specifically in Baptist liturgy.[1]Contents1 Christian theology 2 In Islam 3 Hinduism 4 Pantheism
Pantheism
and pandeism 5 ReferencesChristian theology[edit] In the Christian theology, the described doctrine is supported by the following biblical and Deuterocanonical
Deuterocanonical
references:Wisdom 11:21-26: “For you love all things that exist, and detest none of the things that you have made; for you would not have made anything if you had hated it
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The All
The All
The All
(also called The One, The Absolute, The Great One, The Creator, The Supreme Mind, The Supreme Good, The Father, and The All Mother) is the Hermetic, pantheistic, pandeistic or panentheistic view of God, which is that everything that is, or at least that can be experienced, collectively makes up The All
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Trinity
The Christian doctrine of the Trinity
Trinity
(Latin: Trinitas, lit. 'triad', from trinus, "threefold")[2] holds that God
God
is three consubstantial persons[3] or hypostases[4]—the Father, the Son ( Jesus
Jesus
Christ), and the Holy Spirit—as "one God
God
in three Divine Persons"
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God In Abrahamic Religions
Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Islam
are sometimes called Abrahamic religions because they all accept the tradition of a god, Yahweh, that revealed himself to the prophet Abraham. The theological traditions of all Abrahamic religions
Abrahamic religions
are thus to some extent influenced by the depiction of the God
God
of Israel in the Hebrew Bible, and the historical development of monotheism in the history of Judaism. The Abrahamic God
God
in this sense is the conception of God
God
that remains a common attribute of all three traditions. God
God
is conceived of as eternal, omnipotent, omniscient and as the creator of the universe. God
God
is further held to have the properties of holiness, justice, omni-benevolence and omnipresence
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Personal God
A personal god is a deity who can be related to as a person[1] instead of as an impersonal force, such as the Absolute, "the All", or the "Ground of Being". In the scriptures of the Abrahamic religions, God
God
is described as being a personal creator, speaking in the first person and showing emotion such as anger and pride, and sometimes appearing in anthropomorphic shape.[2] In the Pentateuch, for example, God
God
talks with and instructs his prophets and is conceived as possessing volition, emotions (such as anger, grief and happiness), intention, and other attributes characteristic of a human person
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