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Agios Eleftherios Church, Athens
The Agios Eleftherios church, also known as Mikri Mitropoli ("little metropolitan church") or Panagia Gorgoepikoos is a Byzantine-era church located at the Mitropolis square, next to the Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens
Athens
(Megali Mitropoli). It is often said[by whom?] Michael Choniates, the bishop of Athens, ordered the construction at the start of the 13th century, but is known nowadays it dates to the second half of the 15th century, already in the Ottoman period. Coordinates: 37°58′30.02″N 23°43′48.06″E / 37.9750056°N 23.7300167°E / 37.9750056; 23.7300167 Gallery[edit]Photo of 1887InteriorThe church on a Russian stamp of 1994References[edit] Bente Kiilerich, 'Making Sense of the Spolia in the Little Metropolis in Athens', Arte Medievale n.s. 4, no
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Byzantine
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
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National Gallery (Athens)
The National Art Gallery– Alexandros Soutzos
Alexandros Soutzos
Museum (Greek: Εθνική Πινακοθήκη-Μουσείο Αλεξάνδρου Σούτζου, Ethniki Pinakothiki-Mouseio Alexandrou Soutzou) is an art museum in Athens
Athens
devoted to Greek and European art from the 14th century to the 20th century. It is directed by Marina Lambraki-Plaka.National GlyptothequeClosed and renovating now. 15.08.2016.Contents1 History 2 Collections2.1 Renaissance 2.2 17th-20th century 2.3 Greek artists3 Facts 4 Visitor information 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] It was established in 1878 as a small collection of 117 works exhibited at the Athens
Athens
University. In 1896, Alexandros Soutzos, a jurist and art lover, bequeathed his collection and estate to the Greek Government
Greek Government
aspiring to the creation of an art museum
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Ottoman Greece
Most of the areas which today are within modern Greece's borders were at some point in the past a part of the Ottoman Empire
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Tzistarakis Mosque
A mosque (/mɒsk/; from Arabic: مَـسْـجِـد‎, translit. masjid) is a place of worship for Muslims. There are strict and detailed requirements in Sunni jurisprudence (Arabic: فِـقْـه‎, fiqh) for a place of worship to be considered a mosque, with places that do not meet these requirements regarded as musallas.[1] There are stringent restrictions on the uses of the area formally demarcated as the mosque (which is often a small portion of the larger complex), and in the Islamic Sharī‘ah (Arabic: شَـرِيْـعَـة‎, Law), after an area is formally designated as a mosque, it remains so until the Last Day.[1] Many mosques have elaborate domes, minarets, and prayer halls, in varying styles of architecture. Mosques originated on the Arabian Peninsula, but are now found in all inhabited continents
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History Of Modern Greece
The history of modern Greece
Greece
covers the history of Greece
Greece
from the recognition of its autonomy from the
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Theophil Hansen
Baron
Baron
Theophil Edvard von Hansen (German: [ˈteːofiːl fɔn ˈhanzn̩]; original Danish name: Theophilus Hansen pronounced [teoˈfiːlus ˈhanˀsn̩]; 13 July 1813, in Copenhagen
Copenhagen
– 17 February 1891, in Vienna) was a Danish architect who later became an Austrian citizen
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Benaki Museum
The Benaki Museum, established and endowed in 1930 by Antonis Benakis in memory of his father Emmanuel Benakis, is housed in the Benakis family mansion in downtown Athens, Greece. The museum houses Greek works of art from the prehistorical to the modern times, an extensive collection of Asian art, hosts periodic exhibitions and maintains a state-of-the-art restoration and conservation workshop
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Goulandris Museum Of Cycladic Art
The Nicholas P. Goulandris Foundation - Museum of Cycladic Art is a museum of Athens. It houses a notable collection of artifacts of Cycladic art. The museum was founded in 1986 in order to house the collection of Cycladic and Ancient Greek art belonging to Nicholas and Dolly Goulandris. Starting in the early 1960s, the couple collected Greek antiquities, with special interest in the prehistoric art from the Cyclades
Cyclades
islands of the Aegean Sea. The Museum's main building, erected in the centre of Athens
Athens
in 1985, was designed by the Greek architect Ioannis Vikelas
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Arch Of Hadrian (Athens)
Hadrian
Hadrian
(/ˈheɪdriən/; Latin: Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus; 24 January 76 – 10 July 138 AD) was Roman emperor
Roman emperor
from 117 to 138.[note 1] He was born Publius Aelius Hadrianus, probably at Italica, near Santiponce
Santiponce
(in modern-day Spain), into a Hispano-Roman family with centuries-old roots in Hispania. His father was a maternal first cousin of the emperor Trajan. Some years before Hadrian's accession, he married Trajan's grand-niece, Vibia Sabina. Trajan's wife and Empress, Pompeia Plotina, and his close friend and adviser Licinius Sura, were well disposed towards Hadrian
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National Historical Museum, Athens
The National Historical Museum (Greek: Εθνικό Ιστορικό Μουσείο,[1] Ethnikó Istorikó Mouseío) is a historical museum in Athens. Founded in 1882, is the oldest of its kind in Greece
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Michael Choniates
Michael Choniates
Michael Choniates
(or Acominatus) (Greek: Μιχαήλ Χωνιάτης or Ἀκομινάτος) (c. 1140 – 1220), Byzantine writer and ecclesiastic, was born at Chonae (the ancient Colossae). At an early age he studied at Constantinople
Constantinople
and was the pupil of Eustathius of Thessalonica. Around 1175 he was appointed archbishop of Athens, a position which he retained until 1204.[1] In 1204, he defended the Acropolis of Athens
Acropolis of Athens
from attack by Leo Sgouros, holding out until the arrival of the Crusaders in 1205, to whom he surrendered the city.[2] After the establishment of Latin control, he retired to the island of Ceos
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
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Church Of The Pantanassa, Athens
Church
Church
most commonly refers to:Christian Church, body of Christians, taken as a whole Church
Church
(congregation), a local congregation of a Christian denomination
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Numismatic Museum Of Athens
The Numismatic Museum in Athens
Athens
(Greek: Νομισματικό Μουσείο) is one of the most important museums of Greece
Greece
and houses one of the greatest collections of coins, ancient and modern, in the world. The museum itself is housed in the mansion of the archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann, formally known as Iliou Melathron (Greek: Ιλίου Μέλαθρον, "Palace of Ilion").Contents1 History 2 The Iliou Melathron 3 Collections 4 Location and visitors information 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]Façade close-up.The first tries of coin collecting by the state began shortly after the independence of Greece
Greece
in Aegina. The collection was enriched after excavations, purchases and donations
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