HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Africa (Roman Province)
French Algeria
Algeria
(19th - 20th centuries)French conquest French governorsResistance PacificationEmir Abdelkader Fatma N'SoumerMokrani Revolt Cheikh BouamamaNationalism RCUA FLN GPRAAlgerian War 1958 putsch 1961 putschÉvian Accords Independence referendumPied-Noir Harkis Oujda GroupContemporary era 1960s–80sArab nationalism 1965 putschBerber Spring 1988 Riots1990s Algerian Civil War
[...More...]

"Africa (Roman Province)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rock Art Of The Djelfa Region
The rock art of the Djelfa
Djelfa
region in the Ouled Naïl Range
Ouled Naïl Range
(Algeria) consists of prehistoric cave paintings and petroglyphs dating from the Neolithic
Neolithic
age which have been recognized since 1914. Following the Saharan Atlas Mountains
Atlas Mountains
they follow on from those, to the west, of south Oran
Oran
(the regions of Figuig, Ain Sefra, El Bayadh, Afalou and Tiaret), to which they are related. Comparable engravings have also been described further to the east, in the Constantine (Algeria) region.Contents1 Localities and descriptions 2 The "Hunters" Stage 3 Early stages of domestication 4 The probable ancient regional ecology 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 BibliographyLocalities and descriptions[edit] Some of the engravings of the Djelfa
Djelfa
region seem to have been known since the 1850s (El Idrissia)
[...More...]

"Rock Art Of The Djelfa Region" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fatimid Caliphate
The Fatimid
Fatimid
Caliphate
Caliphate
(Arabic: الفاطميون‎, al-Fāṭimīyūn) was an Ismaili
Ismaili
Shia
Shia
Islamic caliphate that spanned a large area of North Africa, from the Red Sea
Red Sea
in the east to the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
in the west. The dynasty of Arab origin[4][5] ruled across the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
coast of Africa and ultimately made Egypt
Egypt
the centre of the caliphate. At its height the caliphate included in addition to Egypt
Egypt
varying areas of the Maghreb, Sudan, Sicily, the Levant, and Hijaz. The Fatimids
Fatimids
claimed descent from Fatimah, the daughter of Islamic prophet Muhammad
[...More...]

"Fatimid Caliphate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Abbasid Caliphate
The Abbasid Caliphate
Caliphate
(/əˈbæsɪd/ or /ˈæbəsɪd/ Arabic: ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلْعَبَّاسِيَّة‎ al-Khilāfatu al-‘Abbāsīyah) was the third of the Islamic caliphates to succeed the Islamic prophet Muhammad. The Abbasid dynasty
Abbasid dynasty
descended from Muhammad's uncle, Al-Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib
Al-Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib
(566–653 CE), from whom the dynasty takes its name.[2] They ruled as caliphs for most of their period from their capital in Baghdad
Baghdad
in modern-day Iraq, after assuming authority over the Muslim empire from the Umayyads in 750 CE (132 AH). The Abbasid caliphate first centred its government in Kufa, but in 762 the caliph Al-Mansur
Al-Mansur
founded the city of Baghdad, near the Sasanian capital city of Ctesiphon
[...More...]

"Abbasid Caliphate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Umayyad Caliphate
The Umayyad Caliphate
Caliphate
(Arabic: ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلأُمَوِيَّة‎, trans. Al-Khilāfatu al-ʾUmawiyyah), also spelt Omayyad,[2] was the second of the four major caliphates established after the death of Muhammad. The caliphate was ruled by the Umayyad dynasty
Umayyad dynasty
(Arabic: ٱلأُمَوِيُّون‎, al-ʾUmawiyyūn, or بَنُو أُمَيَّة, Banū ʾUmayya, "Sons of Umayya"), hailing from Mecca. An Umayyad clan member had previously come to power as the third Rashidun
Rashidun
Caliph, Uthman ibn Affan
Uthman ibn Affan
(r. 644–656), but official Umayyad rule was established by Muawiya ibn Abi Sufyan, long-time governor of Syria, after the end of the First Muslim Civil War in AD 661
[...More...]

"Umayyad Caliphate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aterian
The Aterian
Aterian
is a Middle Stone Age
Stone Age
(or Middle Palaeolithic) stone tool industry centered in North Africa, but also possibly found in Oman
Oman
and the Thar Desert.[1] The earliest Aterian
Aterian
dates to c. 145,000 years ago, at the site of Ifri n'Ammar in Morocco.[2] However, most of the early dates cluster around the beginning of the Last Interglacial, around 130,000 years ago, when the environment of North Africa
North Africa
began to ameliorate
[...More...]

"Aterian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Iberomaurusian
The Iberomaurusian
Iberomaurusian
("of Iberia and Mauritania"; it was once believed that it extended into Spain) or Oranian is a backed bladelet lithic industry found throughout North Africa.[1] Its name, meaning "of Iberia and Mauritania", is based on Pallary (1909)'s belief[2] that it extended over the strait of Gibraltar into Spain and Portugal, a theory now generally discounted (Garrod 1938).[3] Pallary (1909) originally described the industry based on material found at the site of Abri Mouillah.[2] Because the name of the
[...More...]

"Iberomaurusian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Capsian Culture
The Capsian culture
Capsian culture
was a Mesolithic
Mesolithic
culture centered in the Maghreb, which lasted from about 10,000 to 6,000 BCE. It was named after the town of Gafsa
Gafsa
in Tunisia, which was Capsa in Roman times. The Capsian industry was concentrated mainly in modern Tunisia
Tunisia
and Algeria, with some lithic sites attested in southern Spain
Spain
to Sicily. It is traditionally divided into two horizons, the Capsien typique (Typical Capsian) and the Capsien supérieur (Upper Capsian), which are sometimes found in chronostratigraphic sequence
[...More...]

"Capsian Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rock Art Of South Oran (Algeria)
The rock art of south Oran, are prehistoric engravings dating from the Neolithic
Neolithic
period, which are found in the south of Oran Province, Algeria, in the Saharan Atlas Mountains, in the regions (from west to east) of Figuig, Ain Sefra, El-Bayadh, Aflou
Aflou
and Tiaret. Comparable engravings have been described, even further east, around Djelfa
Djelfa
and in the region of Constantine
[...More...]

"Rock Art Of South Oran (Algeria)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tassili N'Ajjer
Tassili n'Ajjer
Tassili n'Ajjer
(Berber languages: Tasili n Ajjer, Arabic: طاسيلي ناجر‎; "Plateau of the Rivers") is a national park in the Sahara
Sahara
desert, located on a vast plateau in
[...More...]

"Tassili N'Ajjer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ahaggar Mountains
The Hoggar Mountains
Hoggar Mountains
(Arabic: جبال هقار‎, Berber: idurar n Ahaggar, Tuareg: Idurar Uhaggar), also known as the Ahaggar Mountains, are a highland region in the central Sahara, southern Algeria, along the Tropic of Cancer. The mountains cover an area of approximately 550,000 square km (212,000 square miles).[1]Contents1 Geography 2 Environment2.1 Fauna and flora3 Cultural significance 4 Panoramic view 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksGeography[edit]An oasis in the Hoggar MountainsThis mountainous region is located about 1,500 km (930 mi) south of the capital, Algiers. The area is largely rocky desert with an average elevation of more than 900 m (3,000 ft) above sea level
[...More...]

"Ahaggar Mountains" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Libya
Libya
Libya
(/ˈlɪbiə/ ( listen); Arabic: ليبيا‎),[6][7] officially the State of Libya
Libya
(Arabic: دولة ليبيا‎ Dawlat Lībyā),[citation needed][dubious – discuss] is a sovereign state in the Maghreb
Maghreb
region of North Africa, bordered by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, Egypt
Egypt
to the east, Sudan
Sudan
to the southeast, Chad
Chad
and Niger
Niger
to the south, and Algeria
Algeria
and Tunisia
Tunisia
to the west. The country is made of three historical regions, Tripolitania, Fezzan, and Cyrenaica
[...More...]

"Libya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Zirid Dynasty
The Zirid dynasty
Zirid dynasty
(Berber languages: ⵉⵣⵉⵔⵉⴻⵏ Tagelda en Ayt Ziri, Arabic: زيريون‎ /ALA-LC: Zīryūn; Banu Ziri), was a Sanhaja
Sanhaja
Berber dynasty from current Algeria, which ruled the central Maghreb
Maghreb
from 972 to 1014 and Ifriqiya
Ifriqiya
(eastern Maghreb) from 972 to 1148.[3][6] Descendants of Ziri ibn Menad, a military leader who rallied to the Cairo-based Fatimid Caliphate
Fatimid Caliphate
and gave his name to the dynasty, the Zirids were Emirs who ruled in the name of the Fatimids. They gradually established their autonomy until officially breaking with the Fatimids
Fatimids
in the mid-11th century
[...More...]

"Zirid Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roknia
Roknia
Roknia
is a necropolis in the Guelma
Guelma
region of north-east Algeria consisting of more than 7000 dolmens spread over an area of 2 km.[1] Notes[edit]^ "Algérie - Roknia
Roknia
— GeneaWiki"
[...More...]

"Roknia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Third Punic War
The Third Punic
Punic
War (Latin: Tertium Bellum Punicum) (149–146 BC) was the third and last of the Punic Wars
Punic Wars
fought between the former Phoenician colony of Carthage
Carthage
and the Roman Republic. The Punic
Punic
Wars were named because of the Roman name for Carthaginians: Punici, or Poenici.[5] This war was a much smaller engagement than the two previous Punic Wars and focused on Tunisia, mainly on the Siege of Carthage, which resulted in the complete destruction of the city, the annexation of all remaining Carthaginian territory by Rome, and the death or enslavement of the entire Carthaginian population
[...More...]

"Third Punic War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient History
Ancient history
Ancient history
is the aggregate of past events[1] from the beginning of recorded human history and extending as far as the Early Middle Ages or the Post-classical Era. The span of recorded history is roughly 5,000 years, beginning with Sumerian Cuneiform
Cuneiform
script, the oldest discovered form of coherent writing from the protoliterate period around the 30th century BC.[2] The term classical antiquity is often used to refer to history in the Old World
Old World
from the beginning of recorded Greek history
Greek history
in 776 BC (First Olympiad). This roughly coincides with the traditional date of the founding of Rome in 753 BC, the beginning of the history of ancient Rome, and the beginning of the Archaic period in Ancient Greece
[...More...]

"Ancient History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.