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Afghan Carpet
An Afghan rug (or Afghan carpet[1]) is a type of handwoven floor-covering textile traditionally made in Afghanistan.[2] Many of the Afghan rugs are also woven by Afghan refugees who reside in Pakistan.[3] In 2008, 2013, and 2014, Afghan rug won international awards, which is held every year in Hamburg, Germany.[4] The Afghan rugs are mostly assembled in northern and western Afghanistan, by various ethnic groups but mainly by Turkmen.[1] One of the most exotic and distinctive of all oriental rugs is the Shindand or Adraskan (named after local Afghan towns), woven in the Herat Province, in western Afghanistan. Strangely elongated human and animal figures are their signature look. The carpet can be sold across Afghanistan with the most based in Mazar-e Sharif
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Navajo Weaving
Navajo rugs and blankets (Navajo: diyogí) are textiles produced by Navajo people of the Four Corners area of the United States. Navajo textiles are highly regarded and have been sought after as trade items for over 150 years. Commercial production of handwoven blankets and rugs has been an important element of the Navajo economy. As one expert expresses it, "Classic Navajo serapes at their finest equal the delicacy and sophistication of any pre-mechanical loom-woven textile in the world."[1] Navajo textiles were originally utilitarian blankets for use as cloaks, dresses, saddle blankets, and similar purposes. Toward the end of the 19th century, weavers began to make rugs for tourism and export. Typical Navajo textiles have strong geometric patterns. They are a flat tapestry-woven textile produced in a fashion similar to kilims of Eastern Europe and Western Asia, but with some notable differences
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Bakshaish
Bakshaish rugs and carpets are a type of tapestry found in north-west Iran. Bakshaish, Heris County, is a town on the banks of the Aji Chay in the Heris region. Situated in the mountainous region 60 miles east of the large city of Tabriz, Bakshaish is the oldest rug weaving village in the district, noted for carpets with diverse abstract adaptations of age-old tribal and classical Persian motifs. File:Antique Bakshaish “Tree of Life” Rug 8ft 10in x 12ft 3in Circa 1875.png|thumb|Antique Bakshaish "Tree of Life" rug, 8ft 10in x 12ft 3in, circa 1875 Bakshaish rugs adapt the style and sensibility of the most valued smaller tribal carpets from Northern Iran. Bakshaish rugs are considered among the finest examples of larger rugs from the region. Taking their inspiration from Persian classical carpets, the abstract patterns of Bakshaish rugs and carpets feature bold, geometric designs
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Bessarabian Rugs And Carpets
Bessarabian rugs and carpets are the commonly given name for rugs in pile and tapestry technique originating in Russian provinces as well as Ukraine and Moldova during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.1 Some scholars will classify flat-woven carpets as Bessarabian, while referring to knotted-pile carpets as Ukrainian.2 They are predominantly from an area corresponding to modern Bulgaria and Romania.3 Produced under late Ottoman rule, they stand right on the cusp of European and Oriental carpet weaving (see Turkish carpet). While most Persian carpets can be classified to a specific region corresponding to their weave, this is not the case with Bessarabian carpets and rugs
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Catalogne (rug)
A catalogne is a type of woven French-Canadian rag rug, also sometimes used as a blanket, with origins in France, possibly of Norman influence, and later developed in Quebec. Named for one Sieur de Catalan, who lived in the 17th century, the catalogne gained popularity in the New World in the early to mid-19th century. Initially prevalent in Quebec where new cloth was limited, catalogne weaving was also a tradition found in Madawaska County, New Brunswick, and some parts of New England such as Aroostook County, Maine, and later appeared in Ontario. Catalognes are typically woven with a cotton warp and a combination of rags and fragments of clothing and tapestries, cut into strips and spun before being woven into the warp
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Lilihan Carpets And Rugs
Armenians wove Lilihans in Lilihan village in what used to be called Kamareh (now Khomeyn) district in Iran. 1 The term Lilihan is better known in the US, in Europe it is not as widely used.2 Although a wide range of carpet and mat sizes are produced, the most common sizes found are 4 x 6 to 8 x 10 feet.3 The use of a longer pile traditionally appealed to Americans.4 The Lilihan rugs are executed using the Hamadan (single-wefted) weave, typically this means that they have one heavy cotton weft and are made with thick, first quality wool. The Lilihan rugs are the only fabrics in the Sultanabad region to be single-wefted. Lilihan carpets and rugs are coarsely, but tightly flat woven, making them extremely durable. Lilihan carpets and rugs are similar to Sarouk rug carpets in colour, style and thickness.6 According to Leslie Stroh of Rug News, there are about 3000 different designs for Hamadan rugs
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Petate
A petate [peˈtate] is a bedroll used in Central America and Mexico. Its name comes from the Náhuatl word petlatl [ˈpet͡ɬat͡ɬ]. The petate is woven from the fibers of the Palm of petate (Leucothrinax morrisii). The Royal Spanish Academy defines it as a bed.[1] Generally petates are woven in quadrangular forms, though not to any exact dimensions. The main use of the petate is for sleeping. It can be extended on the ground for lying down or sleeping. During the day the petate normally rolls up and hangs from the wall, freeing up space in the room. In very warm places it is used to sleep outdoors. Also it is used for drying seeds, grains, tortillas, and other foodstuffs in the sun, to prevent their touching the ground
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