HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Aerial Bomb
An aerial bomb is a type of explosive weapon intended to travel through the air with predictable trajectories, usually designed to be dropped from an aircraft. Aerial bombs include a vast range and complexity of designs, from unguided gravity bombs to guided bombs, hand tossed from a vehicle, to needing a large specially built delivery vehicle; or perhaps be the vehicle itself such as a glide bomb, instant detonation or delay-action bomb. The act is termed aerial bombing
[...More...]

"Aerial Bomb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pound (mass)
The pound or pound-mass is a unit of mass used in the imperial, United States customary and other systems of measurement. Various definitions have been used; the most common today is the international avoirdupois pound, which is legally defined as exactly 6999453592370000000♠0.45359237 kilograms, and which is divided into 16 avoirdupois ounces.[1] The international standard symbol for the avoirdupois pound is lb;[2] an alternative symbol is lbm[3] (for most pound definitions), # (chiefly in the U.S.), and ℔[4] or ″̶[5] (specifically for the apothecaries' pound). The unit is descended from the Roman libra (hence the abbreviation "lb"). The English word pound is cognate with, among others, German Pfund, Dutch pond, and Swedish pund
[...More...]

"Pound (mass)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prototype
A prototype is an early sample, model, or release of a product built to test a concept or process or to act as a thing to be replicated or learned from.[1] It is a term used in a variety of contexts, including semantics, design, electronics, and software programming. A prototype is generally used to evaluate a new design to enhance precision by system analysts and users.[2] Prototyping serves to provide specifications for a real, working system rather than a theoretical one.[3] In some design workflow models, creating a prototype (a process sometimes called materialization) is the step between the formalization and the evaluation of an idea.[4] The word prototype derives from the Greek πρωτότυπον prototypon, "primitive form", neutral of πρωτότυπος prototypos, "original, primitive", from πρῶτος protos, "first" and τύπος typos, "impression".[1][5]Contents1 Basic prototype categories 2 Differences in creating a prototype vs
[...More...]

"Prototype" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tuy Hoa Air Base
Tuy Hoa Air Base is a former air force base in Vietnam, being closed in 1970. It was built by the United States between 1965–1966 and was used by the United States Air Force during the Vietnam War in the II Corps Tactical Zone of South Vietnam. It was seized by the People's Army of Vietnam in April 1975 and was abandoned for several decades. Today, the site has been redeveloped as Dong Tac Airport.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 31st Tactical Fighter Wing1.2.1 "Misty" Forward Air Controllers 1.2.2 Inactivation1.3 VNAF Use of Tuy Hoa Air Base 1.4 Capture Of Tuy Hoa Air Base 1.5 Current use2 Accidents and incidents 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] Plans for a United States Air Force Base at Tuy Hoa were developed in 1965 after the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin Resolution and the decision to deploy large numbers of United States forces to South Vietnam
[...More...]

"Tuy Hoa Air Base" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Joint Direct Attack Munition
The Joint Direct Attack Munition
Joint Direct Attack Munition
(JDAM) is a guidance kit that converts unguided bombs, or "dumb bombs", into all-weather "smart" munitions. JDAM-equipped bombs are guided by an integrated inertial guidance system coupled to a Global Positioning System
Global Positioning System
(GPS) receiver, giving them a published range of up to 15 nautical miles (28 km). JDAM-equipped bombs range from 500 pounds (227 kg) to 2,000 pounds (907 kg).[1] When installed on a bomb, the JDAM
JDAM
kit is given a GBU (Guided Bomb Unit) nomenclature, superseding the Mark 80 or BLU (Bomb, Live Unit) nomenclature of the bomb to which it is attached. The JDAM
JDAM
is not a stand-alone weapon; rather it is a "bolt-on" guidance package that converts unguided gravity bombs into precision-guided munitions (PGMs)
[...More...]

"Joint Direct Attack Munition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First Balkan War
Ottoman Empire:[6] 50,000 killed 100,000 wounded 115,000 captured 75,000 dead of disease Total: 340,000 dead, wounded or captured Bulgaria:[7] 8,840 killed 4,926 missing 36,877 wounded 10,995 dead of disease Greece:[8] 2,373 killed in action or died of wounds 9,295 wounded 1,558 dead of disease or accidents (incl. 2nd Balkan
Balkan
war) Serbia: 5,000 killed 18,000 wounded[9] 6,698 dead of disease Montenegro:[6][10] 2,430 killed 6,602 wounded 406 dead of disease Total: at least c
[...More...]

"First Balkan War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bulgarian Air Force
80 aircraft 6,500 active duty personnelAnniversaries 16 OctoberWebsite http://airforce.mod.bg/bg/CommandersCommander Major General
Major General
Tsanko StoychevVice Commander Brigadier General
Brigadier General
Anatoliy KrustevInsigniaRoundelAircraft flownAttack Su-25, Mi-24Fighter MiG-29Helicopter Mi-17, Mi-24, Eurocopter
Eurocopter
AS 532 Cougar, Bell 206Reconnaissance An-30Trainer L-39, PC-9Transport L-410, C-27J
C-27J
Spartan, Pilatus PC-12, Airbus A319, Dassault Falcon 2000The Bulgarian Air Force
Bulgarian Air Force
(Bulgarian: Военновъздушни сили) is one of the three branches of the Military of Bulgaria, the other two being the Bulgarian Navy
Bulgarian Navy
and Bulgarian land forces
[...More...]

"Bulgarian Air Force" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aviator
An aircraft pilot or aviator is a person who controls the flight of an aircraft by operating its directional flight controls. Some other aircrew members, such as navigators or flight engineers, are also considered aviators, because they are involved in operating the aircraft's navigation and engine systems. Other aircrew members such as flight attendants, mechanics and ground crew, are not classified as aviators. In recognition of the pilots' qualifications and responsibilities, most militaries and many airlines worldwide award aviator badges to their pilots, and this includes naval aviators.Contents1 History 2 Civilian2.1 Airline2.1.1 Automation2.2 Africa
Africa
and Asia 2.3 Canada 2.4 United States3 Military 4 Unmanned aerial vehicles 5 Space 6 Pilot certifications 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Hot air balloon
Hot air balloon
pilot and passenger in basketThis section needs expansion
[...More...]

"Aviator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grenade
A grenade is a small weapon typically thrown by hand. Generally, a grenade consists of an explosive charge, a detonating mechanism, and firing pin to trigger the detonating mechanism. Once the soldier throws the grenade, the safety lever releases, the striker throws the safety lever away from the grenade body as it rotates to detonate the primer. The primer explodes and ignites the fuse (sometimes called the delay element). The fuse burns down to the detonator, which explodes the main charge. There are several types of grenades such as fragmentation grenades and stick grenades. Fragmentation grenades are probably the most common in armies. They are weapons that are designed to disperse lethal fragments on detonation. The body is generally made of a hard synthetic material or steel, which will provide some fragmentation as shards and splinters, though in modern grenades a pre-formed fragmentation matrix is often used
[...More...]

"Grenade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Captain (land)
The army rank of captain (from the French capitaine) is a commissioned officer rank historically corresponding to the command of a company of soldiers. The rank is also used by some air forces and marine forces. Today, a captain is typically either the commander or second-in-command of a company or artillery battery (or United States Army cavalry troop or Commonwealth squadron). In the Chinese People's Liberation Army, a captain may also command a company, or be the second-in-command of a battalion. In NATO
NATO
countries, the rank of captain is described by the code OF-2 and is one rank above an OF-1 (lieutenant or first lieutenant) and one below an OF-3 (major or commandant)
[...More...]

"Captain (land)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edirne
Edirne
Edirne
,Greek Αδριανούπολις / Adrianoupolis , is a city in the northwestern Turkish province of Edirne
Edirne
in the region of East Thrace, close to Turkey's borders with Greece
Greece
and Bulgaria. Edirne served as the third capital city of the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
from 1363 to 1453,[2] before Constantinople
Constantinople
(present-day Istanbul) became the empire's fourth and final capital
[...More...]

"Edirne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Italo-Turkish War
Italian victoryAnnexation of Libya Start of the First Balkan
Balkan
War Start of the Libyan resistance movementTerritorial changes Italy gains Tripolitania, Cyrenaica, Fezzan, and the Dodecanese islands ( Italian Libya
Italian Libya
established)<
[...More...]

"Italo-Turkish War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Albatros Flugzeugwerke
Albatros-Flugzeugwerke GmbH was a German aircraft manufacturer best known for supplying the German airforces during World War I. The company was based in Johannisthal, Berlin, where it was founded by Walter Huth and Otto Wiener on December 20, 1909.[1] The company (and its subsidiary, Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW)) produced some of the most capable fighter aircraft of World War I, notably the Albatros D.III and Albatros D.V, both designed by Robert Thelen for the firm. The works continued to operate until 1931, when it was merged into Focke-Wulf.Contents1 History 2 Summary of aircraft built by Albatros Flugzeugwerke 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The company was founded in Berlin-Johannisthal the end of 1909, by Enno Walther Huth, as Albatros Werke AG
[...More...]

"Albatros Flugzeugwerke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Contact Fuze
A contact fuze, impact fuze, percussion fuze or direct-action (D.A.) fuze (UK) is the fuze that is placed in the nose of a bomb or shell so that it will detonate on contact with a hard surface. Many impacts are unpredictable: they may involve a soft surface, or an off-axis grazing impact. The pure contact fuze is often unreliable in such cases and so a more sensitive graze fuze or inertia fuze is used instead. The two types are often combined in the same mechanism.[1]Contents1 Artillery fuzes 2 Air-dropped bomb fuzes 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesArtillery fuzes[edit]No. 106 fuzeFurther information: Artillery fuze The British Army's first useful impact fuze for high-explosive shells was the Fuze
Fuze
No. 106 of World War I. (illus.) This used a simple protruding plunger or striker at the nose, which was pushed back to drive a firing pin into the detonator
[...More...]

"Contact Fuze" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Explosive Weapons
An explosive weapon generally uses high explosive to project blast and/or fragmentation from a point of detonation. Explosive weapons may be subdivided by their method of manufacture into explosive ordnance and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Certain types of explosive ordnance and many improvised explosive devices are sometimes referred to under the generic term bomb. When explosive weapons fail to function as designed they are often left as unexploded ordnance (UXO). In the common practice of states, explosive weapons are generally the preserve of the military, for use in situations of armed conflict, and are rarely used for purposes of domestic policing. Certain types of explosive weapons may be categorised as light weapons (e.g
[...More...]

"Explosive Weapons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cluster Bomb
A cluster munition is a form of air-dropped or ground-launched explosive weapon that releases or ejects smaller submunitions. Commonly, this is a cluster bomb that ejects explosive bomblets that are designed to kill personnel and destroy vehicles. Other cluster munitions are designed to destroy runways or electric power transmission lines, disperse chemical or biological weapons, or to scatter land mines. Some submunition-based weapons can disperse non-munitions, such as leaflets. Because cluster bombs release many small bomblets over a wide area, they pose risks to civilians both during attacks and afterwards. Unexploded bomblets can kill or maim civilians and/or unintended targets long after a conflict has ended, and are costly to locate and remove. Cluster munitions
Cluster munitions
are prohibited for those nations that ratify the Convention on Cluster Munitions, adopted in Dublin, Ireland in May 2008
[...More...]

"Cluster Bomb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.