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Aeolian Islands
The Aeolian Islands
Aeolian Islands
(/iːˈoʊliən/) (Italian: Isole Eolie, pronounced [ˈiːzole eˈɔːlje], Sicilian: Ìsuli Eoli, Greek: Αιολίδες Νήσοι, Aiolides Nisoi) are a volcanic archipelago in the Tyrrhenian Sea
Tyrrhenian Sea
north of Sicily, named after the demigod of the winds Aeolus.[1] The islands' inhabitants are known as Aeolians (Italian: Eoliani). The Aeolian Islands
Aeolian Islands
are a popular tourist destination in the summer and attract up to 200,000 visitors annually. The largest island is Lipari
Lipari
and the islands are sometimes referred to as the Lipari
Lipari
Islands or Lipari
Lipari
group
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Knidos
Knidos
Knidos
or Cnidus[1][2] (/ˈnaɪdəs/; Greek: Κνίδος, Greek pronunciation: [knídos]) was an ancient Greek city of Caria
Caria
and part of the Dorian Hexapolis, in south-western Asia Minor, modern-day Turkey. It was situated on the Datça peninsula, which forms the southern side of the Sinus Ceramicus, now known as Gulf of Gökova. By the 4th century BC, Knidos
Knidos
was located at the site of modern Tekir, opposite Triopion Island. But earlier, it was probably at the site of modern Datça (at the half-way point of the peninsula).[3] It was built partly on the mainland and partly on the Island of Triopion or Cape Krio. The debate about it being an island or cape is caused by the fact that in ancient times it was connected to the mainland by a causeway and bridge. Today the connection is formed by a narrow sandy isthmus
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Metal
A metal (from Greek μέταλλον métallon, "mine, quarry, metal"[1][2]) is a material (an element, compound, or alloy) that is typically hard when in solid state, opaque, shiny, and has good electrical and thermal conductivity. Metals are generally malleable—that is, they can be hammered or pressed permanently out of shape without breaking or cracking—as well as fusible (able to be fused or melted) and ductile (able to be drawn out into a thin wire).[3] Around 90 of the 118 elements in the periodic table are metals; the others are nonmetals or metalloids, though elements near the boundaries of each category have been assigned variably to either (hence the lack of an exact count). Some elements appear in both metallic and non-metallic forms. Astrophysicists use the term "metal" to refer collectively to all elements in a star that are heavier than the lightest two, hydrogen and helium, and not just traditional metals
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African Plate
The African Plate
African Plate
is a major tectonic plate straddling the equator as well as the prime meridian. It includes much of the continent of Africa, as well as oceanic crust which lies between the continent and various surrounding ocean ridges
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Continental Shelf
The continental shelf is an underwater landmass which extends from a continent, resulting in an area of relatively shallow water known as a shelf sea. Much of the shelves were exposed during glacial periods and interglacial periods. The shelf surrounding an island is known as an insular shelf. The continental margin, between the continental shelf and the abyssal plain, comprises a steep continental slope followed by the flatter continental rise. Sediment
Sediment
from the continent above cascades down the slope and accumulates as a pile of sediment at the base of the slope, called the continental rise
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Lava
Lava
Lava
is molten rock generated by geothermal energy and expelled through fractures in planetary crust or in an eruption, usually at temperatures from 700 to 1,200 °C (1,292 to 2,192 °F). The resulting structures after solidification and cooling are also sometimes described as lava. The molten rock is formed in the interior of some planets, including Earth, and some of their satellites, though such material located below the crust is referred to by other terms. A lava flow is a moving outpouring of lava created during a non-explosive effusive eruption. When it has stopped moving, lava solidifies to form igneous rock. The term lava flow is commonly shortened to lava
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Calabria
Calabria (Italian pronunciation: [kaˈlaːbrja]; Calàbbria in Calabrian; Calavría in Calabrian Greek; Καλαβρία in Greek; Kalavrì in Arbëresh/Albanian), known in antiquity as Bruttium, is a region in Southern Italy. The capital city of Calabria is Catanzaro. The Regional Council of Calabria is based at the Palazzo Campanella in the city of Reggio Calabria. The region is bordered to the north by the Basilicata Region, to the west by the Tyrrhenian Sea, and to the east by the Ionian Sea. The region covers 15,080 km2 (5,822 sq mi) and has a population of just under 2 million
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Campania
Campania
Campania
(Italian pronunciation: [kamˈpaːnja]) is a region in Southern Italy. As of 2014, the region had a population of around 5,869,000 people, making it the third-most-populous region of Italy;[2] its total area of 13,590 km2 (5,247 sq mi) makes it the most densely populated region in the country.[3] Located on the Italian Peninsula, with the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the west, it includes the small Phlegraean Islands
Phlegraean Islands
and Capri
Capri
for administration as part of the region. Campania
Campania
was colonised by Ancient Greeks
Ancient Greeks
and was part of Magna Græcia. During the Roman era, the area maintained a Greco-Roman culture. The capital city of Campania
Campania
is Naples
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Aegean Islands
The Aegean Islands
Aegean Islands
(Greek: Νησιά Αιγαίου, transliterated: Nisiá Aigaíou; Turkish: Ege Adaları) are the group of islands in the Aegean Sea, with mainland Greece
Greece
to the west and north and Turkey to the east; the island of Crete
Crete
delimits the sea to the south, those of Rhodes, Karpathos
Karpathos
and Kasos
Kasos
to the southeast. The ancient Greek name of the Aegean Sea, Archipelago
Archipelago
(ἀρχιπέλαγος, archipelagos) was later applied to the islands it contains and is now used more generally, to refer to any island group. The vast majority of the Aegean Islands
Aegean Islands
belong to Greece, being split among nine administrative regions
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Urban Development
Urban planning
Urban planning
is a technical and political process concerned with the development and use of land, planning permission, protection and use of the environment, public welfare, and the design of the urban environment, including air, water, and the infrastructure passing into and out of urban areas, such as transportation, communications, and distribution networks.[1] Urban planning
Urban planning
is also referred to as urban and regional planning, regional planning, town planning, city planning, rural planning, urban development or some combination in various areas worldwide. It is considered an interdisciplinary field that includes social, engineering and design sciences
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Peloritani
The Peloritani
Peloritani
(Sicilian: Piluritani, Italian: Monti Peloritani) are a mountain range of north-eastern Sicily, in southern Italy, extending for some 65 km from Capo Peloro
Capo Peloro
to the Nebrodi
Nebrodi
Mountains. On the north and east they are bordered by the Tyrrhenian and Ionian Seas, respectively, and on the south by the Alcantara River . The highest peaks are the Montagna Grande (1,374 m), the Rocca di Novara (1,340 m), the Pizzo di Vernà
Pizzo di Vernà
(1287 m), the Monte Poverello (1279 m) and the Monte Scuderi
Monte Scuderi
(1253 m).[1] The range is made up of a long series of peaks, with an average height of 800–1,000 m, intermingled with ridges and ravines
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Obsidian
Obsidian
Obsidian
is a naturally occurring volcanic glass formed as an extrusive igneous rock.[4][5] Obsidian
Obsidian
is produced when felsic lava extruded from a volcano cools rapidly with minimal crystal growth. It is commonly found within the margins of rhyolitic lava flows known as obsidian flows, where the chemical composition (high silica content) induces a high degree of viscosity and polymerization of the lava. The inhibition of atomic diffusion through this highly viscous and polymerized lava explains the lack of crystal growth. Obsidian
Obsidian
is hard and brittle and therefore fractures with very sharp edges
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Bronze Age
The Bronze
Bronze
Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization. The Bronze
Bronze
Age is the second principal period of the three-age Stone-Bronze- Iron
Iron
system, as proposed in modern times by Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, for classifying and studying ancient societies. An ancient civilization is defined to be in the Bronze
Bronze
Age either by producing bronze by smelting its own copper and alloying with tin, arsenic, or other metals, or by trading for bronze from production areas elsewhere
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Earth's Crust
In geology, the crust is the outermost solid shell of a rocky planet, dwarf planet, or natural satellite. It is usually distinguished from the underlying mantle by its chemical makeup; however, in the case of icy satellites, it may be distinguished based on its phase (solid crust vs. liquid mantle). The crusts of Earth, Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Io, and other planetary bodies formed via igneous processes, and were later modified by erosion, impact cratering, volcanism, and sedimentation. Most terrestrial planets have fairly uniform crusts. Earth, however, has two distinct types: continental crust and oceanic crust
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Mycenae
Mycenae
Mycenae
(Greek: Μυκῆναι Mykēnai or Μυκήνη Mykēnē) is an archaeological site near Mikines
Mikines
in Greece, located about 90 kilometres (56 miles) southwest of Athens, in the north-eastern Peloponnese. Argos
Argos
is 11 kilometres (7 miles) to the south; Corinth, 48 kilometres (30 miles) to the north. From the hill on which the palace was located, one can see across the Argolid
Argolid
to the Saronic Gulf. In the second millennium BC, Mycenae
Mycenae
was one of the major centres of Greek civilization, a military stronghold which dominated much of southern Greece
Greece
and parts of southwest Anatolia. The period of Greek history from about 1600 BC to about 1100 BC is called Mycenaean in reference to Mycenae
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British Isles
The British Isles
British Isles
are a group of islands off the north-western coast of continental Europe
Europe
that consist of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland
Ireland
and over six thousand smaller isles.[7] Situated in the North Atlantic, the islands have a total area of approximately 315,159 km2,[5] and a combined population of just under 70 million. Two sovereign states are located on the islands: the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
(which covers roughly five-sixths of the island of Ireland)[8] and the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
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