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Adolphe Guillaumat
Marie Louis Adolphe Guillaumat
Adolphe Guillaumat
(January 4, 1863 – Nantes, May 18, 1940) was a French Army
French Army
general during World War I.Contents1 Early years 2 Career2.1 World War I 2.2 Occupation of the Rhine 2.3 Political career3 Personal life 4 Notes 5 Bibliography 6 External linksEarly years[edit] Adolphe Guillaumat
Adolphe Guillaumat
was born in Bourgneuf, Charente-Maritime.[1] He graduated first from his class of 1884 at the Saint-Cyr military academy. Career[edit] His early career was partly spent in the French Colonies (Algeria, Tunisia, Tonkin, China). He was appointed a sub-lieutenant of infantry in October 1884. Four years later he was promoted lieutenant. In November 1893 he became a captain and was transferred to the 147th infantry regiment. In 1903 he was appointed professor of military history at St. Cyr, and later became lecturer on infantry tactics at the École de Guerre
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Base Léonore
Base Léonore, or the Léonore database, is a French database that lists the records of the members of the National Order of the Legion of Honor. The database lists the records of those inducted into the Legion of Honor since its 1802 inception and died before 1977.[1] As of January 2014[update], the database contained 390,000 records.[2] References[edit]^ "Présentation de la base de données Léonore" (in French). Paris: Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication. 13 November 2014. Archived from the original on 16 March 2016.  ^ "Léonore" (in French). Paris: Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication. 1 January 2014. Archived from the original on 7 November 2014. External links[edit]Official website Wikidata
Wikidata
has the property: Léonore (P640) (see talk; uses)This database-related article is a stub
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Frédéric Bastiat
Claude- Frédéric Bastiat
Frédéric Bastiat
(French: [klod fʁedeʁik bastja]; 29 June 1801 – 24 December 1850) was a French economist and author who was a prominent member of the French Liberal School.[1] Bastiat developed the economic concept of opportunity cost and introduced the parable of the broken window. He was also a Freemason and member of the French National Assembly.[2] As an advocate of classical economics and the economics of Adam Smith, his views favored a free market and influenced the Austrian School.[3]Contents1 Biography 2 Works2.1 Economic Sophisms and the candlemakers' petition 2.2 The Law (1850) 2.3 "What is Seen and What is Unseen" 2.4 Debate with Pierre-Joseph Proudhon3 Views3.1 Negative railroad4 Bastiat's tomb 5 Books 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksBiography[edit] Bastiat was born on 29 June 1801 in Bayonne, Aquitaine, a port town in the south of France on the Bay of Biscay
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Second Battle Of The Marne
Associated articlesOrder of BattleThe Second Battle of the Marne
Marne
(French: Seconde Bataille de la Marne), or Battle of Reims
Reims
(15 July – 6 August 1918) was the last major German offensive on the Western Front during the First World War. The attack failed when an Allied counterattack by French and American forces, including several hundred tanks, overwhelmed the Germans on their right flank, inflicting severe casualties
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Ardennes
The Ardennes
Ardennes
(/ɑːrˈdɛn/; French: L'Ardenne; Dutch: Ardennen; Walloon: L'Årdene; Luxembourgish: Ardennen; also known as the Ardennes
Ardennes
Forest
Forest
or Forest
Forest
of Ardennes) is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges formed by the geological features of the Ardennes
Ardennes
mountain range and the Moselle and Meuse River
Meuse River
basins
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Armistice
An armistice is a formal agreement of warring parties to stop fighting. It is not necessarily the end of a war, since it may constitute only a cessation of hostilities while an attempt is made to negotiate a lasting peace. It is derived from the Latin
Latin
arma, meaning "arms" (as in weapons) and -stitium, meaning "a stopping".[1] The United Nations Security Council
United Nations Security Council
often imposes, or tries to impose, cease-fire resolutions on parties in modern conflicts. Armistices are always negotiated between the parties themselves and are thus generally seen as more binding than non-mandatory UN cease-fire resolutions in modern international law. An armistice is a modus vivendi and is not the same as a peace treaty, which may take months or even years to agree on. The 1953 Korean War Armistice
Armistice
Agreement is a major example of an armistice which has not been followed by a peace treaty
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Occupation Of The Rhineland
The Allied occupation of the Rhineland
Rhineland
took place following the armistice that brought the fighting of World War I
World War I
to a close on 11 November 1918. The occupying armies consisted of American, Belgian, British and French forces
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Lycée
In France, secondary education is in two stages:collèges (French pronunciation: ​[kɔlɛʒ]) cater for the first four years of secondary education from the ages of 11 to 15. lycées ([lise]) provide a three-year course of further secondary education for children between the ages of 15 and 18
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Toulouse
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Toulouse
Toulouse
(/tuːˈluːz/;[4] French: [tuluz] ( listen), locally [tuˈluzə] ( listen); Occitan: Tolosa [tuˈluzɔ], Latin: Tolosa) is the capital of the French department of Haute-Garonne
Haute-Garonne
and of the region of Occitanie. The city is on the banks of the River Garonne, 150 kilometres (93 miles) from the Mediterranean Sea, 230 km (143 mi) from the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and 680 km (420 mi) from Paris. It is the fourth-largest city in France, with 466,297 inhabitants as of January 2014
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Ophthalmologist
Ophthalmology
Ophthalmology
(/ˌɒfθælˈmɒlədʒi/ or /ˌɒpθælˈmɒlədʒi/)[1] is the branch of medicine that deals with the anatomy, physiology and diseases of the eyeball and orbit.[2] An ophthalmologist is a specialist in medical and surgical eye disease. Their credentials include a doctorate degree in medicine, followed by an additional four years of Ophthalmology
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Charles De Gaulle
Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle (French: [ʃaʁl də ɡol] ( listen); 22 November 1890 – 9 November 1970) was a French general and statesman who led the French Resistance
French Resistance
against Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
in World War II
World War II
and chaired the Provisional Government of the French Republic from 1944 to 1946 in order to reestablish democracy in France. In 1958, he came out of retirement when appointed Prime Minister of France
Prime Minister of France
by President René Coty. He was asked to rewrite the Constitution of France
France
and founded the Fifth Republic after approval by referendum. He was elected President of France
President of France
later that year, a position he was reelected to in 1965 and held until his resignation in 1969. He twice served as ex officio Co-Prince of Andorra
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Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Encyclopædia Britannica
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
( Latin
Latin
for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia. It is written by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,000 contributors, who have included 110 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winners and five American presidents. The 2010 version of the 15th edition, which spans 32 volumes[1] and 32,640 pages, was the last printed edition; digital content and distribution has continued since then. The Britannica is the oldest English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia still in production. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, as three volumes
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Nantes
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Nantes
Nantes
([nɑ̃t] ( listen)) (Gallo: Naunnt or Nantt (pronounced [nɑ̃t] or [nɑ̃ːt]);[1] Breton: Naoned (pronounced [ˈnɑ̃wnət])[2]) is a city in western France
France
on the Loire
Loire
River, 50 km (31 mi) from the Atlantic coast. The city is the sixth-largest in France, with a population of nearly 300,000 in Nantes
Nantes
and an urban area of 600,000 inhabitants
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Charles De Gaulle
Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle (French: [ʃaʁl də ɡol] ( listen); 22 November 1890 – 9 November 1970) was a French general and statesman who led the French Resistance
French Resistance
against Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
in World War II
World War II
and chaired the Provisional Government of the French Republic from 1944 to 1946 in order to reestablish democracy in France. In 1958, he came out of retirement when appointed Prime Minister of France
Prime Minister of France
by President René Coty. He was asked to rewrite the Constitution of France
France
and founded the Fifth Republic after approval by referendum. He was elected President of France
President of France
later that year, a position he was reelected to in 1965 and held until his resignation in 1969. He twice served as ex officio Co-Prince of Andorra
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James Edward Edmonds
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
Sir James Edward Edmonds CB, CMG (25 December 1861 – 2 August 1956) was a British First World War
First World War
officer of the Royal Engineers. Edmonds became the Director of the Historical Section of the Committee of Imperial Defence
Committee of Imperial Defence
on 1 April 1919 and was responsible for the post-war compilation of the 28-volume History of the Great War. Edmonds wrote nearly half the volumes, including eleven of the 14 volumes dealing with the Western Front (Military Operations, France and Belgium). His task was not completed until the final volume was published in 1949.Contents1 Early army life 2 Military Intelligence and MI5 3 First World War 4 Later career 5 References 6 External linksEarly army life[edit] Edmonds was educated at King's College School, London and the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich
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