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Admonitions Scroll
The Admonitions Scroll
Admonitions Scroll
is a Chinese narrative painting on silk that is traditionally ascribed to Gu Kaizhi
Gu Kaizhi
(Chinese: 顧愷之; pinyin: Gù Kǎizhī, ca. 345–ca. 406), but which modern scholarship regards as a 5th to 8th century work that may or may not be a copy of an original Jin Dynasty (265–420)
Jin Dynasty (265–420)
court painting by Gu Kaizhi. The full title of the painting is Admonitions of the Court Instructress (Chinese: 女史箴圖; pinyin: Nǚshǐ zhēn tú). It was painted to illustrate a poetic text written in 292 by the poet-official Zhang Hua 張華 (232–300). The text itself was composed to reprimand Empress Jia 賈后 (257–300) and to provide advice to the women in the imperial court
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Bianqing
The bianqing is an ancient Chinese percussion instrument consisting of a set of L-shaped flat stone chimes known as qing, played melodically. The chimes were hung in a wooden frame and struck with a mallet. Along with the bronze bells called bianzhong, they were an important instrument in China's ritual and court music going back to ancient times. The instrument was imported to Vietnam
Vietnam
(where it is called biên khánh),[1] and Korea
Korea
(where it is called pyeongyeong). It is still used in Korean court and ritual music. See also[edit]Lithophone Bianzhong Traditional Chinese musical instruments Traditional Korean musical instruments Traditional Vietnamese musical instrumentsReferences[edit]^ Đại Dương (2010-12-09). "Sắp phục chế thành công 2 bộ nhạc cụ độc đáo đã thất truyền"
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Emperor Xiaozong Of Song
Emperor Xiaozong of Song
Emperor Xiaozong of Song
(27 November 1127 – 28 June 1194), personal name Zhao Shen, courtesy name Yuanyong, was the 11th emperor of the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
in China and the second emperor of the Southern Song dynasty. He started his reign in 1162 when his adoptive father and predecessor, Emperor Gaozong, abdicated and passed the throne to him. Even though Emperor Gaozong became a Taishang Huang ("Retired Emperor") after his abdication, he remained the de facto ruler, so Emperor Xiaozong only fully took over the reins of power in 1187 after Emperor Gaozong's death
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Sui Dynasty
The Sui Dynasty (/swiː/;[3] Chinese: 隋朝; pinyin: Suí cháo) was a short-lived imperial dynasty of China
China
of pivotal significance. The Sui unified the Northern and Southern dynasties
Northern and Southern dynasties
and reinstalled the rule of ethnic Han Chinese
Han Chinese
in the entirety of China
China
proper, along with sinicization of former nomadic ethnic minorities (the Five Barbarians) within its territory
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National Taiwan University
National Taiwan
Taiwan
University (NTU; Chinese: 國立臺灣大學; pinyin: Guólì Táiwān Dàxué; colloquially, 台大; Táidà) is a national university in Taipei
Taipei
City, Taiwan. Considered the most prestigious university in Taiwan
Taiwan
and one of the top ranked universities in the world, it consists of 11 colleges, 54 departments, 107 graduate institutes and four research centers.[4] The University was founded in 1928 during Japanese rule as one of the Imperial Universities, the Taihoku
Taihoku
Imperial University. As an Imperial University, it is older than Imperial Osaka University
Osaka University
and Nagoya University
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Princeton University
Princeton University
Princeton University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Princeton, New Jersey
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Nanjing
Nanjing
Nanjing
( listen), formerly romanized as Nanking and Nankin,[3] is the capital of Jiangsu
Jiangsu
province of the People's Republic of China and the second largest city in the East
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Zhang Sengyou
Zhang Sengyou (Chinese: 张僧繇, Zhāng Sēngyóu) was a famous Liang dynasty painter the ink style in the reign of Emperor Wu of Liang. His birth and death years are unknown, but he was active circa 490–540. He was a native Wu commandery (now Suzhou, Jiangsu Province). Background and reputation[edit] Sengyou was a member of Zhang clan of Wu, one of the four prominent clans in the Southeastern commandery of Wu. According to Tang dynasty art critic Zhang Yanyuan's "Notes of Past Famous Paintings", Sengyou served as an official during the reign of Emperor Wu of Liang. He was the director of the imperial library and was also in charge of any painting related affairs in the court of Emperor Wu. Later, Sengyou served the country as the general of right flank army and the governor of Wuxing Commandery.[1] His works were rated the finest quality by Zhang Yanyuan
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Peking University
Coordinates: 39°59′23″N 116°18′19″E / 39.98972°N 116.30528°E / 39.98972; 116.30528Peking University北京大学Former namesImperial University of Peking[1]Type PublicEstablished 1898President Lin Jianhua (林建华)Party Secretary Hao Ping (郝平)Academic staff4,206[2]Students 30,248Undergraduates 15,128[2]Postgraduates 15,120[2]Location Haidian District, Beijing, ChinaCampus Urban, 273 ha (670 acres)Colours Red     Affiliations IARU, AEARU, APRU, BESETOHA, C9Website www.pku.edu.cnPeking UniversitySimplified Chinese 北京大学
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Emperor Xiaowen Of Northern Wei
Emperor
Emperor
Xiaowen of Northern Wei
Northern Wei
((北)魏孝文帝) (October 13, 467 – April 26, 499), personal name né Tuoba
Tuoba
Hong (拓拔宏), later Yuan Hong (元宏), or Toba Hung II, was an emperor of the Northern Wei from September 20, 471 to April 26, 499.[1] Emperor
Emperor
Xiaowen implemented a drastic policy of sinicization, intending to centralize the government and make the multi-ethnic state more easy to govern. These policies included changing artistic styles to reflect Chinese preferences and forcing the population to speak the language and to wear Chinese clothes. He compelled his own Xianbei people and others to adopt Chinese surnames, and changed his own family surname from Tuoba
Tuoba
to Yuan
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Wang Xianzhi (calligrapher)
Wang Xianzhi (simplified Chinese: 王献之; traditional Chinese: 王獻之; pinyin: Wáng Xiànzhī; Wade–Giles: Wang Hsien-chih, 344–386), courtesy name Zijing (子敬), was a famous Chinese calligrapher of the Eastern Jin
Eastern Jin
dynasty. He was the seventh and youngest son of the famed Wang Xizhi. Wang inherited his father's talent for the art, although his siblings were all notable calligraphers. His style is more fluid than his father's, demonstrating a reaction against Wang Xizhi's calligraphy. Amongst his innovations is the one-stroke cursive script, which blends all characters in the writing in a single stroke. Until the Tang Dynasty his influence and reputation rivaled and even surpassed that of his father. When he was young, his father, Wang Xizhi
Wang Xizhi
found his talent and started calligraphy since he was seven to eight years old. He used stacks of paper just to practice one pen holding movement
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Palace Museum
The Forbidden City
The Forbidden City
is a palace complex in central Beijing, China. The former Chinese imperial palace from the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
to the end of the Qing dynasty—the years 1420 to 1912, it now houses the Palace Museum. The Forbidden City
The Forbidden City
served as the home of emperors and their households as well as the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government for almost 500 years. Constructed from 1406 to 1420, the complex consists of 980 buildings[2] and covers 72 hectares (over 180 acres).[3][4] The palace exemplifies traditional Chinese palatial architecture,[5] and has influenced cultural and architectural developments in East Asia
East Asia
and elsewhere
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Peony
and for lower taxa see textThe range of Paeonia.The peony or paeony[2][3] is a flowering plant in the genus Paeonia, the only genus in the family Paeoniaceae. They are native to Asia, Europe
Europe
and Western North America. Scientists differ on the number of species that can be distinguished ranging from 25 to 40,[4][5] although the current consensus is 33 known species.[6] The relationships between the species need to be further clarified.[7] Most are herbaceous perennial plants 0.25–1 metre (0.82–3.28 ft) tall, but some are woody shrubs 0.25–3.5 metres (0.82–11.48 ft) tall
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Song Dynasty
The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(/sɔːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279. It was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia
Western Xia
dynasties in the north and was conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
is divided into two distinct periods, Northern and Southern
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Hydrangea
See text Hydrangea
Hydrangea
(/haɪˈdreɪndʒiə/;[1] common names hydrangea or hortensia) is a genus of 70–75 species of flowering plants native to southern and eastern Asia (China, Japan, Korea, the Himalayas, and Indonesia) and the Americas. By far the greatest species diversity is in eastern Asia, notably China, Japan, and Korea. Most are shrubs 1 to 3 meters tall, but some are small trees, and others lianas reaching up to 30 m (98 ft) by climbing up trees. They can be either deciduous or evergreen, though the widely cultivated temperate species are all deciduous.[2] Having been introduced to the Azores, H
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Emperor Zhangzong Of Jin
Emperor Zhangzong of Jin (31 August 1168 – 29 December 1208), personal name Madage, sinicised name Wanyan Jing, was the sixth emperor of the Jurchen-led Jin dynasty, which ruled northern China between the 12th and 13th centuries. He reigned from 20 January 1189 to 29 December 1208.[1]Contents1 Life1.1 Song invasion of the Jin2 Family 3 ReferencesLife[edit] Emperor Zhangzong was the sixth emperor of the Jin dynasty. He inherited the throne from his grandfather, Emperor Shizong[1] and was succeeded by Wanyan Yongji. To some extent, Emperor Zhangzong continued his grandfather's policy of encouraging intensive use of the Jurchen language
Jurchen language
and promotion of Jurchen customs. He forbade wearing of Han Chinese
Han Chinese
clothes and required his subjects to perform the Jurchen kowtow ceremony
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