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Administrative Divisions Of Armenia
Armenia
Armenia
is subdivided into eleven administrative divisions. Of these, ten are provinces, known as marzer (մարզեր) or in the singular form marz (մարզ) in Armenian. Yerevan
Yerevan
is treated separately and granted special administrative status as the country's capital. The chief executive in each of 10 marzer is the marzpet, appointed by the government of Armenia
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Mitanni
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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Districts Of Yerevan
The Districts of Yerevan refers to administrative divisions of Yerevan, the capital of Armenia.The twelve districts of YerevanYerevan is divided into twelve "administrative districts" (վարչական շրջաններ), each with an elected community leader.[1] Each district is divided into unofficial neighborhoods (թաղամասեր or թաղեր)
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Country Subdivision
An administrative division, unit, entity, area or region, also referred to as a subnational entity, constituent unit, or country subdivision, is a portion of a country or other region delineated for the purpose of administration. Administrative divisions are granted a certain degree of autonomy and are usually required to manage themselves through their own local governments. Countries are divided up into these smaller units to make managing their land and the affairs of their people easier. A country may be divided into provinces, which, in turn, are divided into counties, which, in turn, may be divided in whole or in part into municipalities. Administrative divisions are conceptually separate from dependent territories, with the former being an integral part of the state and the other being only under some lesser form of control
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Gyumri
Coordinates: 40°47′22″N 43°50′51″E / 40.78944°N 43.84750°E / 40.78944; 43.84750 Gyumri
Gyumri
(Armenian: Գյումրի, pronounced [ɡjumˈɾi]), is an urban municipal community and the second largest city in Armenia serving as the administrative centre of Shirak Province
Shirak Province
in the northwestern part of the country. By the end of the 19th century, when the city was known as Alexandropol,[a] it was one of the largest cities of Russian-ruled Eastern Armenia
Armenia
with a population similar to that of Yerevan. It was renamed to Leninakan[b] during the Soviet period. The city's population grew above 200,000 prior to the 1988 Spitak
Spitak
earthquake, when it was devastated
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Unitary State
A unitary state is a state governed as a single power in which the central government is ultimately supreme and any administrative divisions (sub-national units) exercise only the powers that the central government chooses to delegate. The majority of states in the world have a unitary system of government. Of the 193 UN member states, 165 are governed as unitary states. In a unitary state, sub-national units are created and abolished (an example being the 22 mainland regions of France
France
being merged into 13), and their powers may be broadened and narrowed, by the central government. Although political power may be delegated through devolution to local governments by statute, the central government remains supreme; it may abrogate the acts of devolved governments or curtail their powers. The United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is an example of a unitary state
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Yeghegnadzor
Yeghegnadzor
Yeghegnadzor
(Armenian: Եղեգնաձոր), is a town and urban municipal community at the south of Armenia, serving as the provincial capital of Vayots Dzor Province. It is located at a road distance of 123 km south of the capital Yerevan, on the shores of Srkghonk River (Armenian: Սրկղոնք), at a height of 1194 meters above sea level.[2] As per the 2016 official estimate, Yeghegnadzor
Yeghegnadzor
had a population of around 6,600. However, as of the 2011 census, the population of the town was 7,944
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Kapan
Kapan
Kapan
(Armenian: Կապան), is a town at the southeast of Armenia, serving as the administrative centre of the urban community of Kapan as well as the provincial capital of Syunik Province. It is located in the valley of the Voghji River, on the northern slopes of Mount Khustup. According to the 2011 census, the population of Kapan
Kapan
is 43,190, slightly declined from 45,711 in the 2001 census.[2] Kapan
Kapan
is the most populous town in the Syunik Province
Syunik Province
and the entire region of southern Armenia
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Timeline Of Armenian History
This is a timeline of Armenian history, comprising important legal and territorial changes and political events in Armenia
Armenia
and its predecessor states. To read about the background to these events, see History of Armenia. See also the list of Armenian kings. This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries. Millennia: 3rd BC · 2nd BC–1st BC · 1st–2nd · 3rd Centuries: 24th BC · 23rd BC · 22nd BC · 21st BC 24th century BC[edit]Year Date Event2400 BCThe Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
identifies the land of Ararat as the resting place of Noah's Ark after the "great deluge" described there. The Indo-Europeans were people who presumably spread from the Caucasus, settling on lands along the way
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Kura–Araxes Culture
The Kura–Araxes culture
Kura–Araxes culture
or the early trans-Caucasian culture was a civilization that existed from about 4000 BC until about 2000 BC,[1] which has traditionally been regarded as the date of its end; in some locations it may have disappeared as early as 2600 or 2700 BC.[2] The earliest evidence for this culture is found on the Ararat plain; it spread northward in Caucasus
Caucasus
by 3000 BC (but never reaching Colchis[3]). Altogether, the early trans-Caucasian culture enveloped a vast area approximately 1,000 km by 500 km,[4] and mostly encompassed, on modern-day territories, the Southern Caucasus
Caucasus
(except western Georgia), northwestern Iran, the northeastern Caucasus, eastern Turkey, and as far as Syria.[5][6] The name of the culture is derived from the Kura and Araxes river valleys
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Vardavar
Vardavar
Vardavar
or Vartavar (Armenian: Վարդավառ) is an Armenian festival in Armenia
Armenia
where people of social groups drench each other with water.Contents1 Origin 2 Festival 3 Gallery 4 External linksOrigin[edit] Although now a Christian
Christian
tradition, celebrating the transfiguration of Jesus Christ (the Feast of the Transfiguration), Vardavar's history dates back to pagan times. The ancient festival is traditionally associated with the goddess Astghik, who was the goddess of water, beauty, love and fertility
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Name Of Armenia
The name Armenia
Armenia
enters English via Latin, from Ancient Greek Ἀρμενία. The Armenian endonym for the Armenian people and country is hayer and hayk’, respectively. The exact etymology of the name is unknown, and there are various speculative attempts to connect it to older toponyms or ethnonyms.Contents1 Etymology 2 Further speculations2.1 From Armanî, Armânum, Ermenen, Urmenu or Minni 2.2 From Hayasa-Azzi
Hayasa-Azzi
(native Armenian name Hayastan) 2.3 Criticism(s)3 Armenian historiographic tradition 4 Modern names 5 References 6 External linksEtymology The earliest attestations of the exonym Armenia
Armenia
date around the 6th century BC. In his trilingual Behistun Inscription, Darius I the Great of Persia refers to Urashtu (in Babylonian) as Armina (in Old Persian) and Harminuya (in Elamite)
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Ijevan
Ijevan
Ijevan
(Armenian: Իջևան), is a town and urban municipal community in Armenia
Armenia
serving as the administrative centre of Tavush Province. It is located at the center of the region, at the foot of Ijevan
Ijevan
ridge of Gugark
Gugark
Mountains, on the shores of Aghstev River. As of the 2011 census, the population of the town was 21,081, making it the most populated town in the province
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Demographics Of Armenia
Contents1 Demographics trends 2 Human development 3 Languages 4 Religions 5 Vital statistics5.1 Fertility Rate (The Demographic Health Survey) [10] 5.2 Structure of the population [12] 5.3 Vital statistics summary data [13][14][15][16][17]6 Ethnic groups 7 Demographic statistics from CIA World Factbook7.1 Population 7.2 Urbanization 7.3 Sex ratio 7.4 Infant mortality rate 7.5 Life expectancy at birth 7.6 Total fertility rate 7.7 HIV/AIDS 7.8 Nationality 7.9 Ethnic groups8 See also 9 References 10 External linksDemographics trends[edit] After registering a steady increase during Soviet period, the population of Armenia
Armenia
declined from peak value of nearly 3.6 mln to 2.92 mln in 2016.[3][4][5] Armenia
Armenia
is the only republic of the former Soviet Union that has an ethnically nearly homogeneous population
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Origin Of The Armenians
Armenians
Armenians
(Armenian: հայեր, hayer [hɑˈjɛɾ]) are an ethnic group native to the Armenian Highlands. Armenians
Armenians
constitute the main population of Armenia
Armenia
and the de facto independent Artsakh. There is a wide-ranging diaspora of around 5 million people of full or partial Armenian ancestry living outside modern Armenia. The largest Armenian populations today exist in Russia, the United States, France, Georgia, Iran, Germany, Ukraine, Lebanon, Brazil and Syria. With the exceptions of Iran
Iran
and the former Soviet states, the present-day Armenian diaspora
Armenian diaspora
was formed mainly as a result of the Armenian Genocide.[25] Most Armenians
Armenians
adhere to the Armenian Apostolic Church, a non-Chalcedonian church, which is also the world's oldest national church
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Hayk
Hayk
Hayk
the Great (Armenian: Հայկ), Armenian pronunciation: [hajk], or The Great Hayk, also known as Hayk Nahapet (Հայկ Նահապետ, Armenian pronunciation: [hajk nahapɛt], Hayk
Hayk
the "head of family" or patriarch[1]), is the legendary patriarch and founder of the Armenian nation. His story is told in the History of Armenia
History of Armenia
attributed to the Armenian historian Moses of Chorene
Moses of Chorene
(410 to 490).Contents1 Etymology 2 Genealogy 3 Folklore3.1 Hayk
Hayk
and King Bel 3.2 Battle of Giants and defeat of Bel4 Comparative mythology 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The name of the patriarch, Հայկ Hayk
Hayk
is not exactly homophonous with the name for "Armenia", Հայք Hayk’
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