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Adena Culture
The Adena culture
Adena culture
was a Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
Native American culture that existed from 1000 to 200 BC, in a time known as the Early Woodland period. The Adena culture
Adena culture
refers to what were probably a number of related Native American societies sharing a burial complex and ceremonial system
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Cone (geometry)
A cone is a three-dimensional geometric shape that tapers smoothly from a flat base (frequently, though not necessarily, circular) to a point called the apex or vertex. A cone is formed by a set of line segments, half-lines, or lines connecting a common point, the apex, to all of the points on a base that is in a plane that does not contain the apex. Depending on the author, the base may be restricted to be a circle, any one-dimensional quadratic form in the plane, any closed one-dimensional figure, or any of the above plus all the enclosed points. If the enclosed points are included in the base, the cone is a solid object; otherwise it is a two-dimensional object in three-dimensional space
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Conch
Conch
Conch
(/kɒŋk, kɒntʃ/)[1][2] is a common name that is applied to a number of different medium to large-sized shells. The term generally applies to large snails whose shell has a high spire and a noticeable siphonal canal (in other words, the shell comes to a noticeable point at both ends). In North America, a conch is often identified as a queen conch, found off the coast of Florida. Queen conchs are valued for fish bait, and are also known as seafood.[3] The group of conchs that are sometimes referred to as "true conchs" are marine gastropod molluscs in the family Strombidae, specifically in the genus Strombus
Strombus
and other closely related genera
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Tattoo
A tattoo is a form of body modification where a design is made by inserting ink, dyes and pigments, either indelible or temporary, into the dermis layer of the skin to change the pigment. The art of making tattoos is tattooing. Tattoos fall into three broad categories: purely decorative (with no specific meaning); symbolic (with a specific meaning pertinent to the wearer); pictorial (a depiction of a specific person or item). Tattoos have historically been regarded in the West as 'uncivilised', and over the last 100 years the fashion has been associated mainly with sailors, working men and criminals
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Pumpkin
A pumpkin is a cultivar of a squash plant, most commonly of Cucurbita pepo, that is round, with smooth, slightly ribbed skin, and deep yellow to orange coloration. The thick shell contains the seeds and pulp. Some exceptionally large cultivars of squash with similar appearance have also been derived from Cucurbita
Cucurbita
maxima. Specific cultivars of winter squash derived from other species, including C. argyrosperma, and C. moschata, are also sometimes called "pumpkin". In New Zealand
New Zealand
and Australian English, the term pumpkin generally refers to the broader category called winter squash elsewhere.[1] Native to North America,[2] pumpkins are widely grown for commercial use and are used both in food and recreation
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Squash (plant)
Cucurbita
Cucurbita
( Latin
Latin
for gourd)[3][4] is a genus of herbaceous vines in the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae, also known as cucurbits, native to the Andes
Andes
and Mesoamerica. Five species are grown worldwide for their edible fruit, variously known as squash, pumpkin, or gourd depending on species, variety, and local parlance,[a] and for their seeds. Other kinds of gourd, also called bottle-gourds, are native to Africa and belong to the genus Lagenaria, which is in the same family and subfamily as Cucurbita
Cucurbita
but in a different tribe
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Smithsonian Institution
The Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Institution
(/smɪθˈsoʊniən/ smith-SOH-nee-ən), established on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States.[1] The institution is named after its founding donor, British scientist James Smithson.[2] Originally organized as the "United States National Museum," that name ceased to exist as an administrative entity in 1967.[3] Termed "the nation's attic"[4] for its eclectic holdings of 154 million items,[2] the Institution's nineteen museums, nine research centers, and zoo include historical and architectural landmarks, mostly located in the District of Columbia.[5] Additional facilities are located in Arizona, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York City, Pittsburgh, Texas, Virginia, and Panama
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South Charleston, West Virginia
South Charleston is a city in Kanawha County, West Virginia, United States The population was 13,450 at the 2010 census. South Charleston was established in 1906, but not incorporated until 1919 by special charter enacted by the West Virginia
West Virginia
Legislature. Its name is based on the city being located primarily on the south side of the Kanawha River, although it is actually northwest, not south, of the city of Charleston. The city is serviced by Interstate 64, U.S. Route 60, U.S. Route 119, West Virginia
West Virginia
Route 601 and West Virginia
West Virginia
Route 214, and is bisected by the Kanawha River. The city is serviced by the Kanawha Valley Regional Transportation Authority bus system. A general aviation airfield, Mallory Airport, is located off Chestnut Street, approximately two miles south of U.S
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Sunflower
Harpalium (Cass.) Cass. Helianthus
Helianthus
or sunflower (/ˌhiːliˈænθəs/)[2] is a genus of plants comprising about 70 species[3] in the family Asteraceae.[4] Except for three species in South America, all Helianthus
Helianthus
species are native to North America. The common name, "sunflower", typically refers to the popular annual species Helianthus
Helianthus
annuus, or the common sunflower, whose round flower heads in combination with the ligules look like the sun.[5] This and other species, notably Jerusalem artichoke
Jerusalem artichoke
(H. tuberosus), are cultivated in temperate regions and some tropical regions as food crops for humans, cattle, and poultry, and as ornamental plants.[6] Perennial sunflower species are not as popular for gardens due to their tendency to spread rapidly and become invasive. Whorled sunflowers, H
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Ohio River
The Ohio
Ohio
River, which streams westward from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Cairo, Illinois, is the largest tributary, by volume, of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the United States. At the confluence, the Ohio
Ohio
is considerably bigger than the Mississippi
Mississippi
( Ohio
Ohio
at Cairo: 281,500 cu ft/s (7,960 m3/s);[2] Mississippi
Mississippi
at Thebes: 208,200 cu ft/s (5,897 m3/s)[3]) and, thus, is hydrologically the main stream of the whole river system. The 981-mile (1,579 km) river flows through or along the border of six states, and its drainage basin includes parts of 15 states. Through its largest tributary, the Tennessee River, the basin includes many of the states of the southeastern U.S
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Chenopodium
See textSynonyms[1]Einadia Raf. Rhagodia R.Br. Vulvaria Bubani, nom. illeg Chenopodium
Chenopodium
sect. Leprophyllum Dumort. Chenopodium
Chenopodium
sect. Chenopodiastrum
Chenopodiastrum
Moq. Chenopodium
Chenopodium
is a genus of numerous species of perennial or annual herbaceous flowering plants known as the goosefoots, which occur almost anywhere in the world.[2] It is placed in the family Amaranthaceae
Amaranthaceae
in the APG II system; older classification systems, notably the widely used Cronquist system, separate it and its relatives as Chenopodiaceae,[3] but this leaves the rest of the Amaranthaceae
Amaranthaceae
polyphyletic
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Greenup County, Kentucky
Greenup County is a county located along the Ohio River in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Kentucky
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Gorget
A gorget /ˈɡɔːrdʒɪt/, from the French gorge meaning throat, was originally a band of linen wrapped around a woman's neck and head in the medieval period,[2][3] or the lower part of a simple chaperon hood. The term subsequently described a steel or leather collar designed to protect the throat, a set of pieces of plate armour, or a single piece of plate armour hanging from the neck and covering the throat and chest
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Nicotiana Rustica
Nicotiana rustica, Aztec tobacco[2] or wild tobacco,[3] called ucuch in southern Mexico (specifically Campeche and Yucatán) due to its Mayan roots,[4] mapacho in South America, and thuoc lao (thuốc lào) in Vietnam, is a rainforest plant in the Solanaceae family. It is a very potent variety of tobacco
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Shamanism
Shamanism
Shamanism
is a practice that involves a practitioner reaching altered states of consciousness in order to perceive and interact with a spirit world and channel these transcendental energies into this world.[1] A shaman (/ˈʃɑːmən/ SHAH-men) is someone who is regarded as having access to, and influence in, the world of benevolent and malevolent spirits, who typically enters into a trance state during a ritual, and practices divination and healing.[2] The word "shaman" probably originates from the Tungusic E
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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