HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Addition
Addition
Addition
(often signified by the plus symbol "+") is one of the four basic operations of arithmetic; the others are subtraction, multiplication and division. The addition of two whole numbers is the total amount of those quantities combined. For example, in the adjacent picture, there is a combination of three apples and two apples together, making a total of five apples. This observation is equivalent to the mathematical expression "3 + 2 = 5" i.e., "3 add 2 is equal to 5". Besides counting items, addition can also be defined on other types of numbers, such as integers, real numbers and complex numbers. This is part of arithmetic, a branch of mathematics. In algebra, another area of mathematics, addition can be performed on abstract objects such as vectors and matrices. Addition
Addition
has several important properties
[...More...]

"Addition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sextus Julius Frontinus
Sextus Julius Frontinus
Frontinus
(c. 40 – 103 AD) was a prominent Roman civil engineer, author, and politician of the late 1st century AD. He was a successful general under Domitian, commanding forces in Roman Britain, and on the Rhine
Rhine
and Danube
Danube
frontiers. A novus homo, he was consul three times. Frontinus
Frontinus
ably discharged several important administrative duties for Nerva
Nerva
and Trajan
[...More...]

"Sextus Julius Frontinus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Verb
A verb, from the Latin
Latin
verbum meaning word, is a word (part of speech) that in syntax conveys an action (bring, read, walk, run, learn), an occurrence (happen, become), or a state of being (be, exist, stand). In the usual description of English, the basic form, with or without the particle to, is the infinitive. In many languages, verbs are inflected (modified in form) to encode tense, aspect, mood, and voice. A verb may also agree with the person, gender or number of some of its arguments, such as its subject, or object
[...More...]

"Verb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Computer
A computer is a device that can be instructed to carry out sequences of arithmetic or logical operations automatically. Modern computers have the ability to follow generalized sets of operations, called programs. These programs enable computers to perform an extremely wide range of tasks. Computers are used as control systems for a wide variety of industrial and consumer devices. This includes simple special purpose devices like microwave ovens and remote controls, factory devices such as industrial robots and computer assisted design, and also general purpose devices like personal computers and mobile devices such as smartphones. Early computers were only conceived as calculating devices. Since ancient times, simple manual devices like the abacus aided people in doing calculations. Early in the Industrial Revolution, some mechanical devices were built to automate long tedious tasks, such as guiding patterns for looms
[...More...]

"Computer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Infix Notation
Infix
Infix
notation Prefix notation ("Polish")v t e Infix
Infix
notation is the notation commonly used in arithmetical and logical formulae and statements. It is characterized by the placement of operators between operands—"infixed operators"—such as the plus sign in 2 + 2.Contents1 Usage 2 Order of operations 3 Further notations 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksUsage[edit] Infix
Infix
notation is more difficult to parse by computers than prefix notation (e.g. + 2 2) or postfix notation (e.g. 2 2 +). However many programming languages use it due to its familiarity. It is more used in arithmetic, e.g. 5 × 6.[1] Order of operations[edit] In infix notation, unlike in prefix or postfix notations, parentheses surrounding groups of operands and operators are necessary to indicate the intended order in which operations are to be performed
[...More...]

"Infix Notation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Underline
An underline, also called an underscore,[1] is a more or less horizontal line immediately below a portion of writing. Single and occasionally double ("double-underscore") underlining is used in hand-written or typewritten documents as a way to emphasise key text.[2] In printed documents underlining is generally avoided, with italics or small caps often used instead, or (especially in headings) using capitalization or bold type
[...More...]

"Underline" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Iteration
Iteration is the act of repeating a process, to generate a (possibly unbounded) sequence of outcomes, with the aim of approaching a desired goal, target or result. Each repetition of the process is also called an "iteration", and the results of one iteration are used as the starting point for the next iteration. In the context of mathematics or computer science, iteration (along with the related technique of recursion) is a standard building block of algorithms.Contents1 Mathematics 2 Computing 3 Education 4 Relationship with recursion 5 Other terminology 6 See also 7 ReferencesMathematics[edit] Iteration in mathematics may refer to the process of iterating a function i.e. applying a function repeatedly, using the output from one iteration as the input to the next
[...More...]

"Iteration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
[...More...]

"Renaissance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
[...More...]

"English Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Compound (linguistics)
In linguistics, a compound is a lexeme (less precisely, a word) that consists of more than one stem. Compounding, composition or nominal composition is the process of word formation that creates compound lexemes. That is, in familiar terms, compounding occurs when two or more words are joined to make one longer word. The meaning of the compound may be similar to or different from the meanings of its components in isolation. The component stems of a compound may be of the same part of speech—as in the case of the English word footpath, composed of the two nouns foot and path—or they may belong to different parts of speech, as in the case of the English word blackbird, composed of the adjective black and the noun bird. With very few exceptions, English compound words are stressed on their first component stem. The process occurs readily in other Germanic languages
Germanic languages
for different reasons
[...More...]

"Compound (linguistics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1 (number)
1 (one, also called unit, unity, and (multiplicative) identity) is a number, numeral, and glyph. It represents a single entity, the unit of counting or measurement. For example, a line segment of unit length is a line segment of length 1
[...More...]

"1 (number)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Proto-Indo-European Root
The roots of the reconstructed Proto-Indo-European language
Proto-Indo-European language
(PIE) are basic parts of words that carry a lexical meaning, so-called morphemes. PIE roots usually have verbal meaning like "eat" or "run". Roots never occur alone in the language
[...More...]

"Proto-Indo-European Root" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gerundive
In Latin grammar, a gerundive (/dʒəˈrʌndɪv/) is a verb form that functions as a verbal adjective. In Classical Latin, the gerundive is distinct in form and function from the gerund and the present active participle. In Late Latin, the differences were largely lost, resulting in a form derived from the gerund or gerundive but functioning more like a participle. The adjectival gerundive form survives in the formation of progressive aspect forms in Italian, Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese. In French the adjectival gerundive and participle forms merged completely, and the term gérondif is used for adverbial use of -ant forms.[1] There is no true equivalent to the gerundive in English; the closest translation is a passive to-infinitive non-finite clause such as books to be read. That reflects the most common use of the Latin gerundive, to combine a transitive verb (such as read) and its object (such as books), usually with a sense of obligation
[...More...]

"Gerundive" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Affix
In linguistics, an affix is a morpheme that is attached to a word stem to form a new word or word form. Affixes may be derivational, like English -ness and pre-, or inflectional, like English plural -s and past tense -ed. They are bound morphemes by definition; prefixes and suffixes may be separable affixes. Affixations, the linguistic process speakers use form different words by adding morphemes (affixes) at the beginning (prefixation), the middle (infixation) or the end (suffixation) of words.Contents1 Positional categories of affixes 2 Lexical affixes 3 Orthographic affixes 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksPositional categories of affixes[edit] Affixes are divided into many categories, depending on their position with reference to the stem. Prefix
Prefix
and suffix are extremely common terms. Infix
Infix
and circumfix are less so, as they are not important in European languages
[...More...]

"Affix" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
[...More...]

"Ancient Greece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.