HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Adam Elliot
Academy Award
Academy Award
Five Australian Film Institute Awards from 11 nominations Young Achiever of the Year for Victoria – 1999,[1] Australian of the Year Awards Over 100 other film awards. Adam Elliot
Adam Elliot
(born 2 January 1972 in Berwick, Victoria, Australia) is an independent Australian stop-motion animation writer, director and producer based in Melbourne, Australia. His five films have collectively participated in over seven hundred film festivals and have received over one hundred awards, including an Academy Award
Academy Award
for Harvie Krumpet[2] and five Annecy
Annecy
Cristals. Elliot calls himself an auteur filmmaker and each of his films have a bittersweet nature to them. He does not engage with commercial work and works exclusively on his own film projects
[...More...]

"Adam Elliot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Avid Technology
Avid Technology
Technology
(often known and styled as Avid) is an American technology and multimedia company founded in August 1987 by Bill Warner, based in Burlington, Massachusetts.[3][4] It specializes in audio and video; specifically, digital non-linear editing (NLE) systems, management and distribution services. Avid products are now used in the television and video industry to create television shows, feature films, and commercials. Media Composer, a professional software-based non-linear editing system, is Avid's flagship product.Contents1 History1.1 Awards 1.2 Acquisitions2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Avid was founded by a marketing manager from Apollo Computer, Bill Warner, a prototype of their first digital nonlinear editing system (the Avid/1) was shown in a private suite at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) convention in April 1988
[...More...]

"Avid Technology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Film Victoria
Film Victoria
Film Victoria
is a statutory authority of the State Government of Victoria, Australia that provides strategic leadership and assistance for film, television, and digital media production in the Australian state of Victoria. The authority invests in projects and people, and promotes Victoria as a world-class production destination nationally and internationally. It works closely with industry and government to position Victoria as a leader in the Australian knowledge and ideas economy through the growth and development of the screen industry.Contents1 History 2 Functions 3 See also
[...More...]

"Film Victoria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Veterinarian
A veterinary physician, usually called a vet, which is shortened from veterinarian (American English, Australian English) or veterinary surgeon (British English), is a professional who practices veterinary medicine by treating diseases, disorders, and injuries in animals.Contents1 Description 2 Etymology and nomenclature 3 History 4 Roles and responsibilities 5 Employment5.1 Focus of practice 5.2 Veterinary specialties 5.3 Mobile vs Stationary Practice 5.4 Salary6 Education and regulation6.1 Veterinary science degrees6.1.1 List of AVMA Accredited Veterinary Colleges6.2 Registration and licensing 6.3 Postgraduate study6.3.1 ABVS Recognized Veterinary Specialties6.4 Curriculum comparison with human medicine7 Impact on human medicine 8 In popular culture 9 Veterinary malpractice 10 Criticisms 11 See also 12 References 13 Further reading 14 External linksDescription[edit]This section does not cite any sources
[...More...]

"Veterinarian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pipe Band
A pipe band is a musical ensemble consisting of pipers and drummers. The term used by military pipe bands, pipes and drums, is also common. The most common form of pipe band, the Scottish/Irish Pipe Bands, consists of a section of pipers playing the great highland bagpipe, a section of snare drummers (often referred to as 'side drummers'), several tenor drummers and usually one, though occasionally two, bass drummers. The entire drum section is known collectively as the drum corps. The tenor drummers and bass drummer are referred to collectively as the 'bass section' (or in North America as the 'midsection'). The band follows the direction of the pipe major; when on parade the band may be led by a drum major, who directs the band with a mace. Standard instrumentation for a pipe band involves 6 to 25 pipers, 3 to 10 side drummers, 1 to 6 tenor drummers and 1 bass drummer
[...More...]

"Pipe Band" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dr. Watson
John H. Watson, known as Dr. Watson, is a fictional character in the Sherlock Holmes
Sherlock Holmes
stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Watson is Sherlock Holmes' friend, assistant and sometime flatmate, and the first person narrator of all but four of these stories. He is described as the typical Victorian-era gentleman, unlike the more eccentric Holmes
[...More...]

"Dr. Watson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sherlock Holmes
Sherlock Holmes
Sherlock Holmes
(/ˈʃɜːrlɒk ˈhoʊmz/) is a fictional private detective created by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Referring to himself as a "consulting detective" in the stories, Holmes is known for his proficiency with observation, forensic science, and logical reasoning that borders on the fantastic, which he employs when investigating cases for a wide variety of clients, including Scotland Yard. First appearing in print in 1887 (in A Study in Scarlet), the character's popularity became widespread with the first series of short stories in The Strand Magazine, beginning with "A Scandal in Bohemia" in 1891; additional tales appeared from then until 1927, eventually totalling four novels and 56 short stories. All but one are set in the Victorian or Edwardian eras, between about 1880 and 1914. Most are narrated by the character of Holmes's friend and biographer Dr
[...More...]

"Sherlock Holmes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Physiological Tremor
A tremor is an involuntary,[1] somewhat rhythmic, muscle contraction and relaxation involving oscillations or twitching movements of one or more body parts. It is the most common of all involuntary movements and can affect the hands, arms, eyes, face, head, vocal folds, trunk, and legs. Most tremors occur in the hands. In some people, a tremor is a symptom of another neurological disorder. A very common tremor is the teeth chattering, usually induced by cold temperatures or by fear.Contents1 Causes1.1 Types of tremors2 Diagnosis2.1 Categories3 Treatment3.1 Medications 3.2 Lifestyle 3.3 Surgery 3.4 Biomechanical loading4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCauses[edit] Tremor can be a symptom associated with disorders in those parts of the brain that control muscles throughout the body or in particular areas, such as the hands
[...More...]

"Physiological Tremor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

St Kilda, Victoria
St Kilda is an inner suburb (neighbourhood) of the metropolitan area of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 6 km south-east of Melbourne's Central Business District. Its local government area is the City of Port Phillip. At the 2011 Census, St Kilda had a population of 17,795. St Kilda was named by Charles La Trobe, after a schooner, Lady of St Kilda, which moored at the main beach for much of 1841, and the ship's master and early settler Lieutenant James Ross Lawrence.[2] During the Victorian and Edwardian eras, St Kilda became a favoured suburb of Melbourne's elite, and many palatial mansions were constructed along its hills and waterfront. Shortly after the turn of the 20th century, St Kilda served a similar function for Melburnians as did Coney Island
Coney Island
to the residents of New York City and its history draws an interesting parallel.[3] Densely populated postwar St Kilda became Melbourne's red-light district, home to low-cost rooming houses
[...More...]

"St Kilda, Victoria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Stopmotion
Stop motion (hyphenated stop-motion when used as an adjective) is an animation technique that physically manipulates an object so that it appears to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a fast sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using plasticine is called clay animation or "clay-mation". Not all stop motion requires figures or models; many stop motion films can involve using humans, household appliances and other things for comedic effect. Stop motion can also use sequential drawing in a similar manner to traditional animation, such as a flip book
[...More...]

"Stopmotion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Australian Film Commission
The Australian Film Commission
Australian Film Commission
(AFC) was an Australian government agency with a mandate to promote the creation and distribution of films in Australia
Australia
as well as to preserve the country's film history. It also had a production arm responsible for production and commissioning of films for the Australian Government. It was established by the Whitlam Government in 1975 as the successor to the Australian Film Development Corporation set up by the Gorton Government. The AFC had offices in Brisbane, Melbourne, Canberra
Canberra
and Sydney.[1] The AFC was funded in part by the national government and in part from its return on investments in film production as well as interest on film development loans
[...More...]

"Australian Film Commission" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Screen Australia
Screen Australia
Screen Australia
is the Australian Federal Government's key funding body for the Australian screen production industry
[...More...]

"Screen Australia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special Broadcasting Service
The Special
Special
Broadcasting Service (SBS) is a hybrid-funded Australian public broadcasting radio, online, and television network. SBS operates four TV channels (SBS, SBS Viceland, Food Network and NITV) and eight radio networks ( SBS Radio
SBS Radio
1, 2, 3 and 4, Arabic24, SBS Chill, SBS PopDesi and SBS PopAsia). SBS Online (sbs.com.au) is home to SBS On Demand video streaming service
[...More...]

"Special Broadcasting Service" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Haileybury College
13  Magenta Publication The Haileyburian, Hearts & WingsFormer pupils Old HaileyburiansWebsite www.haileybury.comHaileybury CollegeHaileybury is an independent school near Hertford
Hertford
in England. Originally a boys' public school, it is now co-educational, enrolling pupils at 11+, 13+ and 16+ stages of education. Over 780 pupils attend Haileybury, of whom more than 500 board.Contents1 History 2 Present day 3 Related schools3.1 Haileybury Almaty 3.2 Haileybury Astana 3.3 Haileybury Turnford4 Model United Nations 5 Notable former pupils 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The previous institution at Haileybury was the East India College (EIC), the training establishment founded in 1806 for administrators of the Honourable East India Company
[...More...]

"Haileybury College" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Short Film
A short film is any motion picture not long enough to be considered a feature film. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
defines a short film as "an original motion picture that has a running time of 40 minutes or less, including all credits".[1] The term featurette originally applied to a film longer than a short subject, but shorter than a standard feature film. The increasingly rare term "short subject" means approximately the same thing. It is an industry term which carries more of an assumption that the film is shown as part of a presentation along with a feature film. "Short" is an abbreviation for either term. Short films are often screened at local, national, or international film festivals and made by independent filmmakers for non profit, either with a low budget or no budget at all. They are usually funded by film grants, non profit organizations, sponsor, or personal funds
[...More...]

"Short Film" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sarah Watt
Sarah Ann Watt (30 August 1958 – 4 November 2011) was an Australian film director, writer and animator. Born in Sydney,[1] Watt completed a Graduate Diploma of Film and Television (Animation) at the Swinburne Film and Television School (now Victorian College of the Arts), Melbourne in 1990. Her student film "Catch of the Day" was to reflect the style of future work. In 1995, she directed a short film, Small Treasures, which won Best Short Film at the Venice Film Festival. In 2000, she made a program for the SBS series Swim Between the Flags called "Local Dive". It was made concurrently with another project that she was directing called "The Way of the Birds" based on the 1996 book of the same name by author Meme McDonald
[...More...]

"Sarah Watt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.