HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Adam And Eve
Adam
Adam
and Eve, according to the creation myth of the Abrahamic religions,[1][2] were the first man and woman. They are central to the belief that humanity is in essence a single family, with everyone descended from a single pair of original ancestors.[3] It also provides the basis for the doctrines of the fall of man and original sin that are important beliefs in Christianity, although not held in Judaism
Judaism
or Islam.[4] In the Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
of the Hebrew Bible, chapters one through five, there are two creation narratives with two distinct perspectives. In the first, Adam
Adam
and Eve
Eve
are not mentioned (at least not mentioned by name). Instead, God created humankind in God's image and instructed them to multiply and to be stewards over everything else that God had made
[...More...]

"Adam And Eve" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tate Collection
Tate is an institution that houses the United Kingdom's national collection of British art, and international modern and contemporary art. It is a network of five art museums: Tate Britain, London (until 2000 known as the Tate Gallery, founded 1897), Tate Liverpool (founded 1988), Tate St Ives, Cornwall (founded 1993), Tate Contemporary (founded 2001) and Tate Modern, London (founded 2000), with a complementary website, Tate Online (created 1998). Tate is not a government institution, but its main sponsor is the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.[1][2] The name 'Tate' is used also as the operating name for the corporate body, which was established by the Museums and Galleries Act 1992 as 'The Board of Trustees of the Tate Gallery'. The gallery was founded in 1897, as the National Gallery of British Art
[...More...]

"Tate Collection" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Double Entendre
A double entendre (/ˌdʌbəl ɒnˈtɒndrə/; French: [dubl ɑ̃.tɑ̃dʁ(ə)]) is a figure of speech or a particular way of wording that is devised to be understood in two ways, having a double meaning. Typically one of the meanings is obvious, given the context whereas the other may require more thought. The innuendo may convey a message that would be socially awkward, sexually suggestive, or offensive to state directly (the Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
describes a double entendre as being used to "convey an indelicate meaning", whilst Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English defines it as "a word or phrase that may be understood in two different ways, one of which is often sexual").[1] A double entendre may exploit puns to convey the second meaning. Double entendres generally rely on multiple meanings of words, or different interpretations of the same primary meaning
[...More...]

"Double Entendre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Form Criticism
Form criticism is a method of biblical criticism that classifies units of scripture by literary pattern and then attempts to trace each type to its period of oral transmission.[1] Form criticism seeks to determine a unit's original form and the historical context of the literary tradition.[1] Form criticism was originally developed for Old Testament studies by Hermann Gunkel, Martin Noth, Gerhard von Rad, and other scholars, who used it to supplement the documentary hypothesis with reference to its oral foundations.[2] It later came to be applied to the Gospels by Karl Ludwig Schmidt, Martin Dibelius and Rudolf Bultmann. Over the past few decades, form criticism's emphasis on oral tradition has waned in Old Testament studies. This is largely because scholars are increasingly skeptical about our ability to distinguish the "original" oral traditions from the literary sources that preserve them
[...More...]

"Form Criticism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Israelites
The Israelites
Israelites
(/ˈɪzriəˌlaɪtsˌ/; Hebrew: בני ישראל‎ Bnei Yisra'el)[1] were a confederation of Iron Age
Iron Age
Semitic-speaking tribes of the ancient Near East, who inhabited a part of Canaan
Canaan
during the tribal and monarchic periods.[2][3][4][5][6] According to the religious narrative of the Hebrew Bible, the Israelites' origin is traced back to the Biblical patriarchs and matriarchs Abraham
Abraham
and his wife Sarah, through their son Isaac
Isaac
and his wife Rebecca, and their son Jacob
Jacob
who was later called Israel, from whence they derive their name, with his wives Leah
Leah
and Rachel. Modern archaeology has largely discarded the historicity of the religious narrative,[7] with it being reframed as constituting an inspiring national myth narrative
[...More...]

"Israelites" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chronology Of The Bible
The chronology of the Bible is an elaborate system of lifespans, "generations," and other means by which the passage of events is measured, beginning with Creation and extending through other significant events. A widespread scholarly understanding is that the Bible marks out a world cycle (Great Year) of 4,000 years, beginning with Creation and ending, presumably, around 164 BCE, with the year AM 2666 for the exodus representing 26 2/3 of 100 years or two-thirds of the total.[1][2][3][4][5] It was theological in intent, not historical in the modern sense,[6] and functions as an implied prophecy whose key lies in the identification of the final event.[7] The count begins with creation and Year 1
[...More...]

"Chronology Of The Bible" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Myth
Myth
Myth
is a folklore genre consisting of narratives that are ostensibly historical, though often supernatural, explaining the origins of a cultural practice or natural phenomenon.[3] The word "myth" is derived from the Greek word mythos (μῦθος), which simply means "story". Mythology
Mythology
can refer either to the study of myths, or to a body or collection of myths.[4] Myth
Myth
can mean 'sacred story', 'traditional narrative' or 'tale of the gods'. A myth can also be a story to explain why something exists.[5] Human cultures' mythologies usually include a cosmogonical or creation myth, concerning the origins of the world, or how the world came to exist. The active beings in myths are generally gods and goddesses, heroes and heroines, or animals and plants. Most myths are set in a timeless past before recorded time or beginning of the critical history
[...More...]

"Myth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paradox
A paradox is a statement that, despite apparently sound reasoning from true premises, leads to an apparently self-contradictory or logically unacceptable conclusion.[1][2] A paradox involves contradictory yet interrelated elements that exist simultaneously and persist over time.[3][4][5] Some logical paradoxes are known to be invalid arguments but are still valuable in promoting critical thinking.[6] Some paradoxes have revealed errors in definitions assumed to be rigorous, and have caused axioms of mathematics and logic to be re-examined
[...More...]

"Paradox" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Setting (narrative)
The setting is both the time and geographic location within a narrative or within a work of fiction. A literary element, the setting helps initiate the main backdrop and mood for a story. Setting has been referred to as story world [1] or milieu to include a context (especially society) beyond the immediate surroundings of the story. Elements of setting may include culture, historical period, geography, and hour. Along with the plot, character, theme, and style, setting is considered one of the fundamental components of fiction.[2]Contents1 Role 2 Types 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesRole[edit] Setting is an important element in a narrative and in some works the setting becomes a character itself
[...More...]

"Setting (narrative)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Human Evolutionary Genetics
Human evolutionary genetics studies how one human genome differs from another human genome, the evolutionary past that gave rise to it, and its current effects. Differences between genomes have anthropological, medical and forensic implications and applications
[...More...]

"Human Evolutionary Genetics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hubris
Hubris
Hubris
(/ˈhjuːbrɪs/ from ancient Greek ὕβρις) describes a personality quality of extreme or foolish pride or dangerous overconfidence,[1] often in combination with (or synonymous with) arrogance.[2] In its ancient Greek context, it typically describes behavior that defies the norms of behavior or challenges the gods, and which in turn brings about the downfall, or nemesis, of the perpetrator of hubris. The adjectival form of the noun hubris is "hubristic". Hubris
Hubris
is usually perceived as a characteristic of an individual rather than a group, although the group the offender belongs to may suffer collateral consequences from the wrongful act. Hubris
Hubris
often indicates a loss of contact with reality and an overestimation of one's own competence, accomplishments or capabilities. C. S. Lewis
C. S

[...More...]

"Hubris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shame
Shame
Shame
is a painful, social emotion[further explanation needed] that can be seen as resulting "...from comparison of the self's action with the self's standards...".[1] but which may equally stem from comparison of the self's state of being with the ideal social context's standard. Thus, shame may stem from volitional action or simply self-regard; no action by the shamed being is required: simply existing is enough. Both the comparison and standards are enabled by socialization
[...More...]

"Shame" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Plot (narrative)
Plot refers to the sequence of events inside a story which affect other events through the principle of cause and effect. The causal events of a plot can be thought of as a series of sentences linked by "and so". Plots can vary from simple structures such as in a traditional ballad to complex interwoven structures sometimes referred to as an imbroglio. The term plot can serve as a verb and refer to a character planning future actions in the story. In the narrative sense, the term highlights the important points which have important consequences within the story, according to Ansen Dibell.[1] The term is similar in meaning to the term storyline.[2][3]Contents1 Definition1.1 Fabula and syuzhet2 Structure 3 Aristotle 4 Freytag4.1 Exposition 4.2 Rising action 4.3 Climax 4.4 Falling action 4.5 Denouement5 Plot devices 6 Plot outline 7 A-Plot 8 Plot Summary 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksDefinition[edit] English novelist E. M
[...More...]

"Plot (narrative)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Wisdom Tradition
Wisdom Tradition is a synonym for Perennialism, the idea that there is a perennial or mystic inner core to all religious or spiritual traditions, without the trappings, doctrinal literalism, sectarianism, and power structures that are associated with institutionalized religion. The Wisdom Tradition provides a conceptual framework for the development of the inner self, living a spiritual life, and the realization of enlightenment or of union with God. Ken Wilber frequently uses the term in the plural in his own books, shadowing the theologian Huston Smith who popularized the usage. In this context it can be considered synonymous with esotericism, but does not have the faintly Western/Middle Eastern/theosophical nuances that are sometimes associated with the latter term. In Christianity and in the Old Testament, the term is used to describe female images of the divine[1] in the Book of Wisdom
[...More...]

"Wisdom Tradition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pun
The pun, also called paronomasia, is a form of word play that exploits multiple meanings of a term, or of similar-sounding words, for an intended humorous or rhetorical effect.[1][2] These ambiguities can arise from the intentional use of homophonic, homographic, metonymic, or figurative language. A pun differs from a malapropism in that a malapropism is an incorrect variation on a correct expression, while a pun involves expressions with multiple correct interpretations. Puns may be regarded as in-jokes or idiomatic constructions, as their usage and meaning are specific to a particular language and its culture. Puns have a long history in human writing
[...More...]

"Pun" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.