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ActionScript
ActionScript
ActionScript
is an object-oriented programming language originally developed by Macromedia
Macromedia
Inc. (later acquired by Adobe Systems). It is a derivation of HyperTalk, the scripting language for HyperCard.[2] It is now a dialect of ECMAScript (meaning it is a superset of the syntax and semantics of the language more widely known as JavaScript), though it originally arose as a sibling, both being influenced by HyperTalk. ActionScript
ActionScript
is used primarily for the development of websites and software targeting the Adobe Flash Player
Adobe Flash Player
platform, used on Web pages in the form of embedded SWF files. ActionScript
ActionScript
3 is also used with Adobe AIR
Adobe AIR
system for the development of desktop and mobile applications
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Programming Paradigm
Programming paradigms are a way to classify programming languages based on their features. Languages can be classified into multiple paradigms. Some paradigms are concerned mainly with implications for the execution model of the language, such as allowing side effects, or whether the sequence of operations is defined by the execution model. Other paradigms are concerned mainly with the way that code is organized, such as grouping a code into units along with the state that is modified by the code
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Object-oriented Language
Object-oriented programming
Object-oriented programming
(OOP) is a programming paradigm based on the concept of "objects", which may contain data, in the form of fields, often known as attributes; and code, in the form of procedures, often known as methods. A feature of objects is that an object's procedures can access and often modify the data fields of the object with which they are associated (objects have a notion of "this" or "self")
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Multi-paradigm
Programming paradigms are a way to classify programming languages based on their features. Languages can be classified into multiple paradigms. Some paradigms are concerned mainly with implications for the execution model of the language, such as allowing side effects, or whether the sequence of operations is defined by the execution model. Other paradigms are concerned mainly with the way that code is organized, such as grouping a code into units along with the state that is modified by the code
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HyperCard
HyperCard
HyperCard
is application software and a programming tool for Apple Macintosh
Macintosh
and Apple IIGS
Apple IIGS
computers. It is among the first successful hypermedia systems before the World Wide Web. It combines database abilities with a graphical, flexible, user-modifiable interface.[2] HyperCard
HyperCard
also features HyperTalk, a programming language for manipulating data and the user interface. This combination of features – simple form layout, database abilities, and ease of programming – led to widespread use in many different roles
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Web Page
A web page (also written as webpage) is a document that is suitable for the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and web browsers. A web browser displays a web page on a monitor or mobile device. The web page usually means what is visible, but the term may also refer to a computer file, usually written in HTML
HTML
or a comparable markup language. Web browsers coordinate various web resource elements for the written web page, such as style sheets, scripts, and images, to present the web page. Typical web pages provide hypertext that includes a navigation bar or a sidebar menu linking to other web pages via hyperlinks, often referred to as links. On a network, a web browser can retrieve a web page from a remote web server. The web server may restrict access to a private network such as a corporate intranet
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Heads Up Display
A head-up display or heads-up display,[1] also known as a HUD, is any transparent display that presents data without requiring users to look away from their usual viewpoints
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Make Controller Kit
Make: (or MAKE:) is an American bimonthly magazine published by Maker Media[1] which focuses on do it yourself (DIY) and/or DIWO (Do It With Others)[2] projects involving computers, electronics, robotics, metalworking, woodworking and other disciplines. The magazine is marketed to people who enjoy making things and features complex projects which can often be completed with cheap materials, including household items. Make magazine is considered "a central organ of the maker movement."[3]Contents1 History and profile 2 Maker Faire 3 Makers 4 Craft 5 Make: television 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory and profile[edit] Its first issue was released in January 2005; as of July 2016, 52 issues were published. It is also available as an iPad version and a Texterity digital edition on the Web, which is free of charge to existing magazine subscribers
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Just-in-time Compilation
In computing, just-in-time (JIT) compilation, (also dynamic translation or run-time compilation)[1], is a way of executing computer code that involves compilation during execution of a program – at run time – rather than prior to execution.[2] Most often, this consists of source code or more commonly bytecode translation to machine code, which is then executed directly
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Variable (programming)
In computer programming, a variable or scalar is a storage location (identified by a memory address) paired with an associated symbolic name (an identifier), which contains some known or unknown quantity of information referred to as a value. The variable name is the usual way to reference the stored value, in addition to referring to the variable itself, depending on the context. This separation of name and content allows the name to be used independently of the exact information it represents. The identifier in computer source code can be bound to a value during run time, and the value of the variable may thus change during the course of program execution.[1][2] Variables in programming may not directly correspond to the concept of variables in mathematics. The latter is abstract, having no reference to a physical object such as storage location. The value of a computing variable is not necessarily part of an equation or formula as in mathematics
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Java (programming Language)
Compilers: OpenJDK
OpenJDK
(javac, sjavac), GNU Compiler for Java (GCJ), Eclipse Compiler
Compiler
for Java (ECJ) Virtual Machines: Oracle HotSpot, Oracle JRockit, Azul Zing, IBM J9, Excelsior JET, Gluon VM, Microsoft
Microsoft
JVM, Apache Harmony JIT-Compilers: Oracle Graal, Azul Falcon (LLVM)DialectsGeneric Java, PizzaInfluenced byAda 83, C++,[2] C#,[3] Eiffel,[4] Generic Java, Mesa,[5] Modula-3,[6] Oberon,[7] Objective-C,[8] UCSD Pascal,[9][10] Object Pascal[11]InfluencedAda 2005, BeanShell, C#, Chapel,[12] Clojure, ECMAScript, Fantom, Gambas,[13] Groovy, Hack,[14] Haxe, J#, JavaScript, Kotlin, PHP, Python, Scala, Seed7, Vala Java Programming at WikibooksJava is a general-purpose computer-programming language that is concurrent, class-based, object-oriented,[15] and specifically designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible
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Expression (programming)
An expression in a programming language is a combination of one or more explicit values, constants, variables, operators, and functions that the programming language interprets (according to its particular rules of precedence and of association) and computes to produce ("to return", in a stateful environment) another value. This process, as for mathematical expressions, is called evaluation. In simple settings, the resulting value is usually one of various primitive types, such as numerical, string, and logical; in more elaborate settings, it can be an arbitrary complex data type. For example, 2+3 is an arithmetic and programming expression which evaluates to 5. A variable is an expression because it denotes a value in memory, so y+6 is an expression
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Operator (programming)
Programming languages
Programming languages
typically support a set of operators: constructs which behave generally like functions, but which differ syntactically or semantically from usual functions. Common simple examples include arithmetic (addition with +), comparison (with >), and logical operations (such as AND or &&). More involved examples include assignment (usually = or :=), field access in a record or object (usually .), and the scope resolution operator (often ::). Languages usually define a set of built-in operators, and in some cases allow user-defined operators.Contents1 Syntax 2 Semantics 3 User-defined operators 4 Examples 5 Compilation 6 Operator overloading 7 Operand coercion 8 Operator features in programming languages 9 See also 10 Notes 11 ReferencesSyntax[edit] Syntactically operators usually contrast to functions
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Program Loops
In computer science, control flow (or flow of control) is the order in which individual statements, instructions or function calls of an imperative program are executed or evaluated. The emphasis on explicit control flow distinguishes an imperative programming language from a declarative programming language. Within an imperative programming language, a control flow statement is a statement the execution of which results in a choice being made as to which of two or more paths to follow
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Procedural Programming
Procedural programming is a programming paradigm, derived from structured programming, based upon the concept of the procedure call. Procedures, also known as routines, subroutines, or functions (not to be confused with mathematical functions, but similar to those used in functional programming), simply contain a series of computational steps to be carried out. Any given procedure might be called at any point during a program's execution, including by other procedures or itself. The first major procedural programming languages first appeared circa 1960, including Fortran, ALGOL, COBOL
COBOL
and BASIC.[1] Pascal and C were published closer to the 1970s, while Ada was released in 1980.[1] Go is an example of a more modern procedural language, first published in 2009. Computer processors provide hardware support for procedural programming through a stack register and instructions for calling procedures and returning from them
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Switch Statement
In computer programming languages, a switch statement is a type of selection control mechanism used to allow the value of a variable or expression to change the control flow of program execution via a multiway branch. Switch statements function somewhat similar to the if statement used in programming languages like C/C++, C#, Visual Basic .NET, Java and exists in most high-level imperative programming languages such as Pascal, Ada, C/C++, C#, Visual Basic .NET, Java, and in many other types of language, using such keywords as switch, case, select or inspect. Switch statements come in two main variants: a structured switch, as in Pascal, which takes exactly one branch, and an unstructured switch, as in C, which functions as a type of goto
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