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Acorn Electron
The Acorn Electron
Acorn Electron
is a budget version of the BBC Micro educational/home computer made by Acorn Computers
Acorn Computers
Ltd. It has 32 kilobytes of RAM, and its ROM includes BBC BASIC
BBC BASIC
v2 along with its operating system. The Electron was able to save and load programs onto audio cassette via a supplied converter cable that connected it to any standard tape recorder that had the correct sockets. It was capable of basic graphics, and could display onto either a television set, a colour (RGB) monitor or a "green screen" monitor. For a short period, the Electron was reportedly the best selling micro in the United Kingdom.[1]Contents1 History 2 Popular upgrades2.1 Acorn Plus 12.1.1 Compatibility2.2 Acorn Plus 2 2.3 Acorn Plus 32.3.1 ADFS quirks2.4 First Byte Joystick Interface 2.5 P.R.E.S. Advanced Plus 3 2.6 P.R.E.S
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Teletext
Teletext
Teletext
(or broadcast teletext) is a television information retrieval service created in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the early 1970s by the Philips
Philips
Lead Designer for VDUs, John Adams. Teletext
Teletext
is a means of sending pages of text and simple geometric shapes from mosaic blocks to a VBI decoder equipped television screen by use of a number of reserved vertical blanking interval lines that together form the dark band dividing pictures horizontally on the television screen.[1] It offers a range of text-based information, typically including news, weather and TV schedules. Paged subtitle (or closed captioning) information is also transmitted within the television signal. It is closely linked to the PAL
PAL
broadcast system used in Europe
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Popular Computing Weekly
Popular Computing Weekly was a computer magazine in the UK published from 1982 to 1990. It was sometimes referred to as PCW (although that abbreviation is more commonly associated with Personal Computer World magazine). Overview[edit] The magazine was first published on 23 April 1982.[1] Its subject range was general, covering gaming, business, and productivity software. The founding company was Sunshine Publications[2] based in London
London
and the launch editor was Duncan Scot.[1] During 1989 it incorporated Computer Gamesweek. It was noteworthy for being the UK's only national weekly computer magazine of the time, and for its back page being dominated by an advertisement in the form of a comic strip, Piman, by the firm Automata UK between the years 1983 and 1986. A further noteworthy feature of the early editions was the high-quality artwork on the magazine covers
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Tape Recorder
An audio tape recorder, tape deck or tape machine is an analog audio storage device that records and plays back sounds, including articulated voices, usually using magnetic tape, either wound on a reel or in a cassette, for storage. In its present-day form, it records a fluctuating signal by moving the tape across a tape head that polarizes the magnetic domains in the tape in proportion to the audio signal. Tape-recording devices include reel-to-reel tape deck and the cassette deck. The use of magnetic tape for sound recording originated around 1930. Magnetizable tape revolutionized both the radio broadcast and music recording industries. It gave artists and producers the power to record and re-record audio with minimal loss in quality as well as edit and rearrange recordings with ease
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8-bit
In computer architecture, 8-bit integers, memory addresses, or other data units are those that are 8 bits (1 octet) wide. Also, 8-bit CPU and ALU architectures are those that are based on registers, address buses, or data buses of that size. 8-bit is also a generation of microcomputers in which 8-bit microprocessors were the norm. The IBM System/360
IBM System/360
introduced byte-addressable memory with 8-bit bytes, as opposed to bit-addressable or decimal digit-addressable or word-addressable memory, although its general purpose registers were 32 bits wide, and addresses were contained in the lower 24 bits of those addresses
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Hermann Hauser
Hermann Maria Hauser, KBE,[9] FRS,[5][6] FREng,[7] FInstP, CPhys (born 1948[1]) is an Austrian-born entrepreneur who is primarily associated with Silicon Fen
Silicon Fen
in England.[10][11][12][13][14]Contents1 Education and early life 2 Career 3 Awards and honours 4 See also 5 ReferencesEducation and early life[edit] When he was 16 he came to the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
to learn English at a language school in Cambridge.[15] After a master's degree in Physics from Vienna
Vienna
University,[1] he returned to the University of Cambridge to do a PhD in Physics at the Cavendish Laboratory.[1][3] Career[edit] Hauser is probably best known for his part in setting up Acorn Computers with Chris Curry
Chris Curry
in 1978
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Sinclair ZX Spectrum
The ZX Spectrum
ZX Spectrum
(UK: /zɛd ɛks ˈspɛktrəm/) is an 8-bit personal home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research. Referred to during development as the ZX81
ZX81
Colour and ZX82,[2][3] it was launched as the ZX Spectrum
ZX Spectrum
by Sinclair to highlight the machine's colour display, compared with the black and white of its predecessor, the ZX81.[4] The Spectrum was released as eight different models, ranging from the entry level with 16 KB RAM released in 1982 to the ZX Spectrum +3
ZX Spectrum +3
with 128 KB RAM and built in floppy disk drive in 1987; together they sold over 5 million units worldwide (not counting clones).[5] The Spectrum was among the first mainstream-audience home computers in the UK, similar in significance to the Commodore 64
Commodore 64
in the USA
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Chris Curry
Christopher Curry
Christopher Curry
(born 28 January 1946 in Cambridge) is the co-founder of Acorn Computers, with Hermann Hauser
Hermann Hauser
and Andy Hopper. He became a millionaire as a result of Acorn’s success. In his early career days, he worked at Pye, Royal Radar Establishment and W.R Grace Laboratories. Then, in April 1966 he joined Sinclair Radionics where he worked for 13 years. He was involved with their hifi products and their electric vehicle. In 1972, he helped Sinclair Radionics to launch its first electronic calculator, the Executive. He set up Cambridge
Cambridge
Processor Unit Ltd. (CPU) in December 1978. Their first product was the Acorn Microcomputer (later called the System 1). In 1983, he co-founded Redwood Publishing with Michael Potter and Christopher Ward and they bought the Acorn User
Acorn User
title
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Commodore 64
The Commodore 64, also known as the C64 or the CBM 64, is an 8-bit home computer introduced in January 1982 by Commodore International (first shown at the Consumer Electronics Show, in Las Vegas, January 7–10, 1982).[5] It has been listed in the Guinness World Records
Guinness World Records
as the highest-selling single computer model of all time,[6] with independent estimates placing the number sold between 10 and 17 million units.[3] Volume production started in early 1982, marketing in August for US$595 (equivalent to $1,509 in 2017).[7][8] Preceded by the Commodore VIC-20
Commodore VIC-20
and Commodore PET, the C64 took its name from its 64 kilobytes (65,536 bytes) of RAM
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WH Smith
WHSmith
WHSmith
plc (also known as WHS or colloquially as Smith's, and formerly W. H. Smith & Son) is a British retailer, headquartered in Swindon, Wiltshire, which operates a chain of high street, railway station, airport, port, hospital and motorway service station shops selling books, stationery, magazines, newspapers and entertainment products. The company was formed by Henry Walton Smith and his wife Anna in 1792 as a news vendor in London. It remained under the ownership of the Smith family for many years, and saw large-scale expansion during the 1970s as the company began to diversify into other markets. Following a rejected private equity takeover in 2004, the company began to focus on its core retail business
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BBC Basic
BASIC
BASIC
(an acronym for Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code)[2] is a family of general-purpose, high-level programming languages whose design philosophy emphasizes ease of use. In 1964, John G. Kemeny, Thomas E. Kurtz
Thomas E. Kurtz
and Mary Kenneth Keller designed the original BASIC
BASIC
language at Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College
in New Hampshire, United States. They wanted to enable students in fields other than science and mathematics to use computers. At the time, nearly all use of computers required writing custom software, which was something only scientists and mathematicians tended to learn. Versions of BASIC
BASIC
became widespread on microcomputers in the mid-1970s and 1980s. Microcomputers usually shipped with BASIC, often in the machine's firmware
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Market Capitalization
Market capitalization
Market capitalization
(market cap) is the market value at a point in time of the shares outstanding of a publicly traded company, being equal to the share price at that point of time multiplied by the number of shares outstanding.[2][3] As outstanding stock is bought and sold in public markets, capitalization could be used as an indicator of public opinion of a company's net worth and is a determining factor in some forms of stock valuation. Market capitalization
Market capitalization
is used by the investment community in ranking the size of companies, as opposed to sales or total asset figures. It is also used in ranking the relative size of stock exchanges, being a measure of the sum of the market capitalizations of all companies listed on each stock exchange
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Olivetti
Olivetti
Olivetti
S.p.A. is an Italian manufacturer of typewriters, computers, tablets, smartphones, printers and other such business products as calculators and fax machines
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Dixons Retail
Dixons Retail
Dixons Retail
plc was one of the largest consumer electronics retailers in Europe
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Amstrad CPC
The Amstrad
Amstrad
CPC (short for Colour Personal Computer) is a series of 8-bit home computers produced by Amstrad
Amstrad
between 1984 and 1990. It was designed to compete in the mid-1980s home computer market dominated by the Commodore 64
Commodore 64
and the Sinclair ZX Spectrum, where it successfully established itself primarily in the United Kingdom, France, Spain, and the German-speaking parts of Europe. The series spawned a total of six distinct models: The CPC464, CPC664, and CPC6128 were highly successful competitors in the European home computer market
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